OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 18, Iss. 9 — Apr. 26, 2010
  • pp: 8847–8852
« Show journal navigation

Compact all-fiber high-energy fiber laser with sub-300-fs duration

X. M. Liu and D. Mao  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 18, Issue 9, pp. 8847-8852 (2010)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.18.008847


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (673 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

We report a compact all-fiber high-energy fiber laser that consists of a laser oscillator and a compression section. The laser oscillator generates the pulses with high energy and large chirp. The compression section is made of a piece of standard single-mode fiber that dechirps the chirped pulses. The compact all-fiber fiber laser produces pulses with 8 nJ of the pulse energy and 290 fs of the pulse duration.

© 2010 OSA

1. Introduction

Fiber lasers have attracted extensive attention because of their simple design, low cost, high stability, and low alignment sensitivity [1

1. N. N. Akhmediev, J. M. Soto-Crespo, and Ph. Grelu, “Roadmap to ultra-short record high-energy pulses out of laser oscillators,” Phys. Lett. A 372(17), 3124–3128 (2008). [CrossRef]

5

5. K. Kieu, W. H. Renninger, A. Chong, and F. W. Wise, “Sub-100 fs pulses at watt-level powers from a dissipative-soliton fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 34(5), 593–595 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Mode locking technique is the standard method of achieving short pulses from a fiber laser. The first all-fiber ring cavity to produce stable subpicosecond pulses was achieved by using the passive mode-locking technique of polarization additive pulse mode-locking (P-APM) [6

6. K. Tamura, H. A. Haus, and E. P. Ippen, “Self-starting additive pulse mode-locked erbium fibre ring laser,” Electron. Lett. 28(24), 2226–2228 (1992). [CrossRef]

,7

7. L. E. Nelson, D. Jones, K. Tamura, H. Haus, and E. Ippen, “Ultrashort-pulse fiber ring lasers,” Appl. Phys. B 65(2), 277–294 (1997). [CrossRef]

]. Based on this kind of cavity design, fiber lasers emit chirp-free pulses with the secant-hyperbolic shape due to the balance between the fiber nonlinearity (i.e., self-phase modulation) and the fiber linear dispersion (i.e., GVD). This type of fiber lasers based on the balance of (positive) nonlinear and (negative) dispersive phase shifts typically generates relatively low-energy pulses (~10 pJ to 100 pJ) of picosecond duration (~0.5 ps to 1 ps). Usually, the pulse energy is limited to 0.1 nJ in standard single-mode fiber (SMF) by the soliton area theorem [7

7. L. E. Nelson, D. Jones, K. Tamura, H. Haus, and E. Ippen, “Ultrashort-pulse fiber ring lasers,” Appl. Phys. B 65(2), 277–294 (1997). [CrossRef]

,8

8. F. W. Wise, A. Chong, and W. Renninger, “High-energy femtosecond fiber lasers based on pulse propagation at normal dispersion,” Laser Photon. Rev. 2(1–2), 58–73 (2008). [CrossRef]

]. Although Yoshida et al. achieved a erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser with pulse duration of 52 fs by using soliton narrowing and high order soliton compression, the pulse energy of their laser was very low (<0.01 nJ) [9

9. E. Yoshida, Y. Kimura, and M. Nakazawa, “Femtosecond erbium-doped fiber laser with nonlinear polarization rotation and its soliton compression,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 33(Part 1, No. 10), 5779–5783 (1994). [CrossRef]

].

To achieve higher energy pulses, EDF amplifier was employed to amplify the 250-fs seed pulses by using four 1480-nm pumps [10

10. J. W. Nicholson, A. D. Yablon, P. S. Westbrook, K. S. Feder, and M. F. Yan, “High power, single mode, all-fiber source of femtosecond pulses at 1550 nm and its use in supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Express 12(13), 3025–3034 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Although the pulse energy was increased to 8.7 nJ, it is obvious that the high-energy pulse was obtained by the combination of EDF laser and EDF amplifier (i.e., the system consists of a laser and a amplifier). Then this laser system becomes much expensive and less convenient for practical applications. Moreover, passively mode-locked fiber lasers based on large-mode-area fibers (e.g., photonic-crystal fiber (PCF) [11

11. B. Liu, M. Hu, X. Fang, Y. Wu, Y. Song, L. Chai, C. Wang, and A. Zheltikov, “High-power wavelength-tunable photonic-crystal-fiber-based oscillator-amplifier-frequency-shifter femtosecond laser system and its applications for material microprocessing,” Laser Phys. Lett. 6(1), 44–48 (2009). [CrossRef]

13

13. C. Lecaplain, B. Ortaç, and A. Hideur, “High-energy femtosecond pulses from a dissipative soliton fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 34(23), 3731–3733 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]), double-clad gain fibers [5

5. K. Kieu, W. H. Renninger, A. Chong, and F. W. Wise, “Sub-100 fs pulses at watt-level powers from a dissipative-soliton fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 34(5), 593–595 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,14

14. B. Ortaç, J. Limpert, S. Jetschke, S. Unger, V. Reichel, J. Kirchhof, and A. Tünnermann, “High-energy soliton pulse generation with a passively mode-locked Er/Yb-doped multifilament-core fiber laser,” Appl. Phys. B 98(1), 27–31 (2010). [CrossRef]

], and other components [15

15. H. Zhang, Q. L. Bao, D. Y. Tang, L. M. Zhao, and K. P. Loh, “Large energy soliton erbium-doped fiber laser with a graphene-polymer composite mode locker,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 95(14), 141103 (2009). [CrossRef]

,16

16. H. Zhang, D. Y. Tang, L. M. Zhao, Q. L. Bao, and K. P. Loh, “Large energy mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser with atomic layer graphene,” Opt. Express 17(20), 17630–17635 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] were proposed. Unfortunately, these kinds of lasers are not the all-fiber structure because some separate elements (e.g., dichroic mirrors and/or gratings) have to be added into the laser cavity. As a result, the cost of lasers is increased, and the stability is deteriorated because the laser cavity is susceptible to misalignment.

Recently, the parabolic-pulse laser [17

17. F. Ilday, J. Buckley, W. Clark, and F. W. Wise, “Self-Similar Evolution of Parabolic Pulses in a Laser,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 92(21), 213902 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], all-normal-dispersion laser [18

18. A. Chong, W. H. Renninger, and F. W. Wise, “Properties of normal-dispersion femtosecond fiber lasers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25(2), 140–148 (2008). [CrossRef]

,19

19. L. M. Zhao, D. Y. Tang, H. Zhang, T. H. Cheng, H. Y. Tam, and C. Lu, “Dynamics of gain-guided solitons in an all-normal-dispersion fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 32(13), 1806–1808 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], and dissipative laser [5

5. K. Kieu, W. H. Renninger, A. Chong, and F. W. Wise, “Sub-100 fs pulses at watt-level powers from a dissipative-soliton fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 34(5), 593–595 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] were proposed to generate high-energy pulses. Even, Pulses with energy of >20 nJ and duration of <200 fs had been achieved in an all-normal-dispersion fiber laser [20

20. A. Chong, W. H. Renninger, and F. W. Wise, “All-normal-dispersion femtosecond fiber laser with pulse energy above 20 nJ,” Opt. Lett. 32(16), 2408–2410 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. However, most of them were based on the Yb-doped fibers. These lasers emit large chirped pulses. The chirped pulses have to be dechirped with an additional external system [5

5. K. Kieu, W. H. Renninger, A. Chong, and F. W. Wise, “Sub-100 fs pulses at watt-level powers from a dissipative-soliton fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 34(5), 593–595 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,17

17. F. Ilday, J. Buckley, W. Clark, and F. W. Wise, “Self-Similar Evolution of Parabolic Pulses in a Laser,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 92(21), 213902 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,18

18. A. Chong, W. H. Renninger, and F. W. Wise, “Properties of normal-dispersion femtosecond fiber lasers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25(2), 140–148 (2008). [CrossRef]

,20

20. A. Chong, W. H. Renninger, and F. W. Wise, “All-normal-dispersion femtosecond fiber laser with pulse energy above 20 nJ,” Opt. Lett. 32(16), 2408–2410 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], because the standard SMF does not compress these pulses with ~1 μm. In addition, although a laser oscillator delivering pulses with energies up to 10 nJ at 1.64 μm was achieved by using the pump source of Raman fiber laser, the pulse formation is subject to intrapulse Raman-scattering [21

21. A. Ruehl, V. Kuhn, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Normal dispersion erbium-doped fiber laser with pulse energies above 10 nJ,” Opt. Express 16(5), 3130–3135 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. The pump efficiency is very low, and the laser cavity is not an all-fiber structure so that the stability is deteriorated.

The theoretical and experimental results show that the mode-locked fiber lasers are expected to generate high-energy pulses when they have longer cavity length [3

3. X. Wu, D. Y. Tang, H. Zhang, and L. M. Zhao, “Dissipative soliton resonance in an all-normal-dispersion erbium-doped fiber laser,” Opt. Express 17(7), 5580–5584 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,22

22. E. J. R. Kelleher, J. Travers, Z. Sun, A. Rozhin, A. Ferrari, S. Popov, and J. Taylor, “Nanosecond-pulse fiber lasers mode-locked with nanotubes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 95(11), 111108 (2009). [CrossRef]

] and larger net cavity GVD [18

18. A. Chong, W. H. Renninger, and F. W. Wise, “Properties of normal-dispersion femtosecond fiber lasers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25(2), 140–148 (2008). [CrossRef]

]. Taking into account the fact that the standard SMF has the capacity of compressing the pulses with ~1.55 μm, we have proposed a compact all-fiber mode-locking EDF laser with 25.5 m of cavity length and 0.8 ps2 of net cavity GVD. The proposed laser generates the pulses with 8 nJ of the pulse energy and 290 fs of the pulse duration. We believe that the proposed laser with the simple design, high stability, ultrashort pulse, and high pulse-energy will have important applications.

2. Experimental setup and operation principle

The proposed all-fiber laser system is shown schematically in Fig. 1
Fig. 1 Schematic diagram of the experimental setup for compact all-fiber high-energy fiber laser. PC: polarization controller; PS-ISO: polarization-sensitive isolator; WDM: wavelength-division-multiplexed; SMF: single-mode fiber; EDF: erbium-doped fiber.
. It consists of a laser oscillator and a compression section. The laser oscillator is made of a polarization-sensitive isolator, two sets of polarization controllers, a wavelength-division-multiplexed coupler, a 18-m-long EDF with absorption 6 dB/m at 980 nm, and a fused coupler with 70% output. The polarization-sensitive isolator, which provides unidirectional operation and polarization selectivity in a ring-cavity configuration, together with two polarization controllers form a P-APM system. The EDF has a dispersion parameter of about 54 × 10−3 ps2/m at 1550 nm. A 977-nm laser diode provides the pump power for laser system. The polarization state of waves in the laser cavity can be controlled by adjusting two polarization controllers. The compression section is the standard SMF with the anomalous dispersion of about −22 × 10−3 ps2/m and a length of about 80 m.

Because the total length of laser oscillator is 25.5 m with the net cavity GVD of about 0.8 ps2, pulses that can exist at large positive net-cavity-dispersion rely on the dissipative processes. Then the proposed laser oscillator would presumably have to exploit dissipative processes in the mode-locked pulse shaping, and it emits pulses that can be considered as dissipative solitons [8

8. F. W. Wise, A. Chong, and W. Renninger, “High-energy femtosecond fiber lasers based on pulse propagation at normal dispersion,” Laser Photon. Rev. 2(1–2), 58–73 (2008). [CrossRef]

]. Since the laser oscillator has the strong normal GVD, it generates the pulses with high energy and large chirp. Pulses are output via a fused coupler, and launched into a compression section that is made of a piece of standard SMF. Then the chirped pulses are dechirped to chirp-free pulses with sub-300-fs duration.

3. Experimental results and discussions

The P-APM mode-locking technique is used to generate stable, self-starting, high-energy, sub-300-fs pulses at the fundamental repetition rate from a unidirectional fiber ring laser. By appropriately adjusting two polarization controllers of the laser oscillator, self-started mode locking of the laser can be achieved when the pump power is beyond a threshold value ~70 mW. After mode locking, the laser generates stable pulses with the fundamental cavity repetition rate ~8.2 MHz. The oscilloscope trace and the radio-frequency (RF) spectrum are shown in Figs. 2(a)
Fig. 2 (a) Oscilloscope trace and (b) RF spectrum at the fundamental cavity repetition rate.
and 2(b), respectively.

When the pump power is a range of ~70 mw to ~150 mW, the proposed laser operates on the single-pulse state. Figures 3
Fig. 3 Optical spectra of pulses.
and 4
Fig. 4 Autocorrelation trace of pulses before the compression. The experimental results are measured at port A in Fig. 1. The solid and dashed curves denote the experimental results and the Gauss-fit curve, respectively.
show the optical spectrum and the autocorrelation trace of pulse emitted from the laser oscillator (i.e., before the compression) at pump power of ~125 mW, respectively. We can observe from Fig. 3 that the optical spectrum of pulses has steep spectral edges with about 18 nm of the edge-to-edge width. Figure 4 shows that the autocorrelation trace has a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of about 32.6 ps. If a Gaussian pulse profile is assumed, the pulse width is about 23.1 ps. Therefore the pulse is strongly chirped.

After the compression section (Fig. 1), the chirped pulses are dechirped to the chirp-free pulses. In experiments, the length of SMF in compression section is gradually shortened from 300 m to 20 m in order to achieve the best compression for pulses. Experiment results show that the best length of SMF in our laser is about 80 m in this state. The autocorrelation trace of pulses after the best compression is shown in Fig. 5
Fig. 5 Autocorrelation trace of pulses after the compression. The experimental results are measured at port B in Fig. 1. The solid and dashed curves denote the experimental results and the Gauss-fit curve, respectively.
. One can see from Fig. 5 that the autocorrelation trace has a FWHM of about 0.4 ps. On the assumption of a Gaussian pulse profile, the chirp-free pulses have about 290 fs of the pulse duration. We can observe from Fig. 5 that the small satellites exist on the dechirped pulse and they contain about 7% of pulse energy. The satellites result from the nonlinear chirp of the pulse edges. Note that both the chirp and the spectral width of pulse determine the length of SMF in compression section, and the larger net cavity dispersion and the narrower spectral width, the longer SMF for the best compression.

Figure 6
Fig. 6 Relationship of the pulse energy versus the pump power.
shows the pulse energy as a function of the pump power. The experimental results show that the average power of pulse for our fiber laser can be up to ~65 mW, corresponding to about 8 nJ of the pulse energy, under the pump power of ~125 mW. The proposed laser will operate on the multi-pulse state when the pump power is more than ~150 mW. Usually, the spectral filtering and/or the overdrive of nonlinear polarization (NP) effect may play essential roles in the multiple pulse formation in the large-normal-dispersion fiber lasers [2

2. X. Liu, L. Wang, X. Li, H. Sun, A. Lin, K. Lu, Y. Wang, and W. Zhao, “Multistability evolution and hysteresis phenomena of dissipative solitons in a passively mode-locked fiber laser with large normal cavity dispersion,” Opt. Express 17(10), 8506–8512 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,8

8. F. W. Wise, A. Chong, and W. Renninger, “High-energy femtosecond fiber lasers based on pulse propagation at normal dispersion,” Laser Photon. Rev. 2(1–2), 58–73 (2008). [CrossRef]

]. The spectral and temporal widths of pulses become narrower once an additional pulse is generated, and then they are increased with the increase of pump power. The experimental observations show that, with the appropriate setting of two polarization controllers, the soliton breakup effect can be sufficiently eliminated. As it happens, however, the pulses are difficult to be compressed to be less than 1 ps.

Apparently, the pulse energy of our laser is over 80 times higher than that of the conventional fiber soliton lasers, which is limited to 0.1 nJ [8

8. F. W. Wise, A. Chong, and W. Renninger, “High-energy femtosecond fiber lasers based on pulse propagation at normal dispersion,” Laser Photon. Rev. 2(1–2), 58–73 (2008). [CrossRef]

]. As a result, our fiber laser has the capacity of generating ulstrashort high-energy pulses without the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique that is extensively used in conventional high-energy laser system [22

22. E. J. R. Kelleher, J. Travers, Z. Sun, A. Rozhin, A. Ferrari, S. Popov, and J. Taylor, “Nanosecond-pulse fiber lasers mode-locked with nanotubes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 95(11), 111108 (2009). [CrossRef]

,23

23. P. K. Mukhopadhyay, K. Ozgoren, I. Budunoglu, and F. Ilday, “All-Fiber Low-Noise High-Power Femtosecond Yb-Fiber Amplifier System Seeded by an All-Normal Dispersion Fiber Oscillator,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 15(1), 145–152 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. Because the proposed fiber laser has the compact all-fiber configuration, both long-term stability and short-term stability are excellent and hence the 8-nJ, sub-300-fs pulsed laser can find important applications on commercially available components. Experimental results show that our laser can stably operate with little fluctuations for several days, and it can effectively withstand the environmental effects such as mechanical perturbation and moderate temperature variations.

4. Conclusion

In this paper, we have proposed a compact all-fiber mode-locking fiber laser that consists of a laser oscillator and a compression section. The laser oscillator generates the highly chirped pulses that are dechirped to chirp-free pulses by a compression section. Our compact all-fiber fiber laser generates pulses with more than 8 nJ of the pulse energy and about 290 fs of the pulse duration. Comparing with the conventional fiber soliton lasers, the pulse energy of our laser is increased more than 80 times [7

7. L. E. Nelson, D. Jones, K. Tamura, H. Haus, and E. Ippen, “Ultrashort-pulse fiber ring lasers,” Appl. Phys. B 65(2), 277–294 (1997). [CrossRef]

,8

8. F. W. Wise, A. Chong, and W. Renninger, “High-energy femtosecond fiber lasers based on pulse propagation at normal dispersion,” Laser Photon. Rev. 2(1–2), 58–73 (2008). [CrossRef]

]. The compact all-fiber fiber laser with the high energy and ultrashort pulses has the simple design and excellent stability so that it can find important applications on commercially available components, ultrafast process analysis, multiphoton microscopy, control of the fast response of optoelectronic devices, etc.

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the “Hundreds of Talents Programs” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grants 10874239 and 10604066. The author would especially like to thank Leiran Wang for help with the experiments.

References and links

1.

N. N. Akhmediev, J. M. Soto-Crespo, and Ph. Grelu, “Roadmap to ultra-short record high-energy pulses out of laser oscillators,” Phys. Lett. A 372(17), 3124–3128 (2008). [CrossRef]

2.

X. Liu, L. Wang, X. Li, H. Sun, A. Lin, K. Lu, Y. Wang, and W. Zhao, “Multistability evolution and hysteresis phenomena of dissipative solitons in a passively mode-locked fiber laser with large normal cavity dispersion,” Opt. Express 17(10), 8506–8512 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

X. Wu, D. Y. Tang, H. Zhang, and L. M. Zhao, “Dissipative soliton resonance in an all-normal-dispersion erbium-doped fiber laser,” Opt. Express 17(7), 5580–5584 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

A. Cabasse, G. Martel, and J. L. Oudar, “High power dissipative soliton in an Erbium-doped fiber laser mode-locked with a high modulation depth saturable absorber mirror,” Opt. Express 17(12), 9537–9542 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

K. Kieu, W. H. Renninger, A. Chong, and F. W. Wise, “Sub-100 fs pulses at watt-level powers from a dissipative-soliton fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 34(5), 593–595 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

K. Tamura, H. A. Haus, and E. P. Ippen, “Self-starting additive pulse mode-locked erbium fibre ring laser,” Electron. Lett. 28(24), 2226–2228 (1992). [CrossRef]

7.

L. E. Nelson, D. Jones, K. Tamura, H. Haus, and E. Ippen, “Ultrashort-pulse fiber ring lasers,” Appl. Phys. B 65(2), 277–294 (1997). [CrossRef]

8.

F. W. Wise, A. Chong, and W. Renninger, “High-energy femtosecond fiber lasers based on pulse propagation at normal dispersion,” Laser Photon. Rev. 2(1–2), 58–73 (2008). [CrossRef]

9.

E. Yoshida, Y. Kimura, and M. Nakazawa, “Femtosecond erbium-doped fiber laser with nonlinear polarization rotation and its soliton compression,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 33(Part 1, No. 10), 5779–5783 (1994). [CrossRef]

10.

J. W. Nicholson, A. D. Yablon, P. S. Westbrook, K. S. Feder, and M. F. Yan, “High power, single mode, all-fiber source of femtosecond pulses at 1550 nm and its use in supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Express 12(13), 3025–3034 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

B. Liu, M. Hu, X. Fang, Y. Wu, Y. Song, L. Chai, C. Wang, and A. Zheltikov, “High-power wavelength-tunable photonic-crystal-fiber-based oscillator-amplifier-frequency-shifter femtosecond laser system and its applications for material microprocessing,” Laser Phys. Lett. 6(1), 44–48 (2009). [CrossRef]

12.

B. Ortaç, O. Schmidt, T. Schreiber, J. Limpert, A. Tünnermann, and A. Hideur, “High-energy femtosecond Yb-doped dispersion compensation free fiber laser,” Opt. Express 15(17), 10725–10732 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

C. Lecaplain, B. Ortaç, and A. Hideur, “High-energy femtosecond pulses from a dissipative soliton fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 34(23), 3731–3733 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

B. Ortaç, J. Limpert, S. Jetschke, S. Unger, V. Reichel, J. Kirchhof, and A. Tünnermann, “High-energy soliton pulse generation with a passively mode-locked Er/Yb-doped multifilament-core fiber laser,” Appl. Phys. B 98(1), 27–31 (2010). [CrossRef]

15.

H. Zhang, Q. L. Bao, D. Y. Tang, L. M. Zhao, and K. P. Loh, “Large energy soliton erbium-doped fiber laser with a graphene-polymer composite mode locker,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 95(14), 141103 (2009). [CrossRef]

16.

H. Zhang, D. Y. Tang, L. M. Zhao, Q. L. Bao, and K. P. Loh, “Large energy mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser with atomic layer graphene,” Opt. Express 17(20), 17630–17635 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

17.

F. Ilday, J. Buckley, W. Clark, and F. W. Wise, “Self-Similar Evolution of Parabolic Pulses in a Laser,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 92(21), 213902 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

18.

A. Chong, W. H. Renninger, and F. W. Wise, “Properties of normal-dispersion femtosecond fiber lasers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25(2), 140–148 (2008). [CrossRef]

19.

L. M. Zhao, D. Y. Tang, H. Zhang, T. H. Cheng, H. Y. Tam, and C. Lu, “Dynamics of gain-guided solitons in an all-normal-dispersion fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 32(13), 1806–1808 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

20.

A. Chong, W. H. Renninger, and F. W. Wise, “All-normal-dispersion femtosecond fiber laser with pulse energy above 20 nJ,” Opt. Lett. 32(16), 2408–2410 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

21.

A. Ruehl, V. Kuhn, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Normal dispersion erbium-doped fiber laser with pulse energies above 10 nJ,” Opt. Express 16(5), 3130–3135 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

22.

E. J. R. Kelleher, J. Travers, Z. Sun, A. Rozhin, A. Ferrari, S. Popov, and J. Taylor, “Nanosecond-pulse fiber lasers mode-locked with nanotubes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 95(11), 111108 (2009). [CrossRef]

23.

P. K. Mukhopadhyay, K. Ozgoren, I. Budunoglu, and F. Ilday, “All-Fiber Low-Noise High-Power Femtosecond Yb-Fiber Amplifier System Seeded by an All-Normal Dispersion Fiber Oscillator,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 15(1), 145–152 (2009). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(060.5530) Fiber optics and optical communications : Pulse propagation and temporal solitons
(140.3500) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, erbium
(140.4050) Lasers and laser optics : Mode-locked lasers

ToC Category:
Lasers and Laser Optics

History
Original Manuscript: January 19, 2010
Revised Manuscript: March 31, 2010
Manuscript Accepted: April 12, 2010
Published: April 13, 2010

Citation
X. M. Liu and D. Mao, "Compact all-fiber high-energy fiber laser with sub-300-fs duration," Opt. Express 18, 8847-8852 (2010)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-18-9-8847


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. N. N. Akhmediev, J. M. Soto-Crespo, and Ph. Grelu, “Roadmap to ultra-short record high-energy pulses out of laser oscillators,” Phys. Lett. A 372(17), 3124–3128 (2008). [CrossRef]
  2. X. Liu, L. Wang, X. Li, H. Sun, A. Lin, K. Lu, Y. Wang, and W. Zhao, “Multistability evolution and hysteresis phenomena of dissipative solitons in a passively mode-locked fiber laser with large normal cavity dispersion,” Opt. Express 17(10), 8506–8512 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. X. Wu, D. Y. Tang, H. Zhang, and L. M. Zhao, “Dissipative soliton resonance in an all-normal-dispersion erbium-doped fiber laser,” Opt. Express 17(7), 5580–5584 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. A. Cabasse, G. Martel, and J. L. Oudar, “High power dissipative soliton in an Erbium-doped fiber laser mode-locked with a high modulation depth saturable absorber mirror,” Opt. Express 17(12), 9537–9542 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. K. Kieu, W. H. Renninger, A. Chong, and F. W. Wise, “Sub-100 fs pulses at watt-level powers from a dissipative-soliton fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 34(5), 593–595 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. K. Tamura, H. A. Haus, and E. P. Ippen, “Self-starting additive pulse mode-locked erbium fibre ring laser,” Electron. Lett. 28(24), 2226–2228 (1992). [CrossRef]
  7. L. E. Nelson, D. Jones, K. Tamura, H. Haus, and E. Ippen, “Ultrashort-pulse fiber ring lasers,” Appl. Phys. B 65(2), 277–294 (1997). [CrossRef]
  8. F. W. Wise, A. Chong, and W. Renninger, “High-energy femtosecond fiber lasers based on pulse propagation at normal dispersion,” Laser Photon. Rev. 2(1–2), 58–73 (2008). [CrossRef]
  9. E. Yoshida, Y. Kimura, and M. Nakazawa, “Femtosecond erbium-doped fiber laser with nonlinear polarization rotation and its soliton compression,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 33(Part 1, No. 10), 5779–5783 (1994). [CrossRef]
  10. J. W. Nicholson, A. D. Yablon, P. S. Westbrook, K. S. Feder, and M. F. Yan, “High power, single mode, all-fiber source of femtosecond pulses at 1550 nm and its use in supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Express 12(13), 3025–3034 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. B. Liu, M. Hu, X. Fang, Y. Wu, Y. Song, L. Chai, C. Wang, and A. Zheltikov, “High-power wavelength-tunable photonic-crystal-fiber-based oscillator-amplifier-frequency-shifter femtosecond laser system and its applications for material microprocessing,” Laser Phys. Lett. 6(1), 44–48 (2009). [CrossRef]
  12. B. Ortaç, O. Schmidt, T. Schreiber, J. Limpert, A. Tünnermann, and A. Hideur, “High-energy femtosecond Yb-doped dispersion compensation free fiber laser,” Opt. Express 15(17), 10725–10732 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. C. Lecaplain, B. Ortaç, and A. Hideur, “High-energy femtosecond pulses from a dissipative soliton fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 34(23), 3731–3733 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  14. B. Ortaç, J. Limpert, S. Jetschke, S. Unger, V. Reichel, J. Kirchhof, and A. Tünnermann, “High-energy soliton pulse generation with a passively mode-locked Er/Yb-doped multifilament-core fiber laser,” Appl. Phys. B 98(1), 27–31 (2010). [CrossRef]
  15. H. Zhang, Q. L. Bao, D. Y. Tang, L. M. Zhao, and K. P. Loh, “Large energy soliton erbium-doped fiber laser with a graphene-polymer composite mode locker,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 95(14), 141103 (2009). [CrossRef]
  16. H. Zhang, D. Y. Tang, L. M. Zhao, Q. L. Bao, and K. P. Loh, “Large energy mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser with atomic layer graphene,” Opt. Express 17(20), 17630–17635 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  17. F. Ilday, J. Buckley, W. Clark, and F. W. Wise, “Self-Similar Evolution of Parabolic Pulses in a Laser,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 92(21), 213902 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  18. A. Chong, W. H. Renninger, and F. W. Wise, “Properties of normal-dispersion femtosecond fiber lasers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25(2), 140–148 (2008). [CrossRef]
  19. L. M. Zhao, D. Y. Tang, H. Zhang, T. H. Cheng, H. Y. Tam, and C. Lu, “Dynamics of gain-guided solitons in an all-normal-dispersion fiber laser,” Opt. Lett. 32(13), 1806–1808 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  20. A. Chong, W. H. Renninger, and F. W. Wise, “All-normal-dispersion femtosecond fiber laser with pulse energy above 20 nJ,” Opt. Lett. 32(16), 2408–2410 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  21. A. Ruehl, V. Kuhn, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Normal dispersion erbium-doped fiber laser with pulse energies above 10 nJ,” Opt. Express 16(5), 3130–3135 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  22. E. J. R. Kelleher, J. Travers, Z. Sun, A. Rozhin, A. Ferrari, S. Popov, and J. Taylor, “Nanosecond-pulse fiber lasers mode-locked with nanotubes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 95(11), 111108 (2009). [CrossRef]
  23. P. K. Mukhopadhyay, K. Ozgoren, I. Budunoglu, and F. Ilday, “All-Fiber Low-Noise High-Power Femtosecond Yb-Fiber Amplifier System Seeded by an All-Normal Dispersion Fiber Oscillator,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 15(1), 145–152 (2009). [CrossRef]

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.


« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited