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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 19, Iss. 20 — Sep. 26, 2011
  • pp: 19775–19780
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Low noise GHz passive harmonic mode-locking of soliton fiber laser using evanescent wave interaction with carbon nanotubes

Chang Su Jun, Ju Hee Im, Sang Hwa Yoo, Sun Young Choi, Fabian Rotermund, Dong-Il Yeom, and Byoung Yoon Kim  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 19, Issue 20, pp. 19775-19780 (2011)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.19.019775


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Abstract

Passive harmonic mode-locking in soliton fiber laser is presented with excellent noise characteristics by employing a single-walled carbon nanotubes saturable absorber designed to interact with evanescent wave of the laser field. The 34th harmonic mode-locking pulses at 943.16 MHz repetition rate were stably generated with 18 mW output power, >50 dB side-mode suppression and −140 dB/Hz relative intensity noise. Soliton energy control with polarization controller further increased the harmonic order to 61st, 1.692 GHz, but with compromised performance. Scaling to higher-order harmonic mode-locking is discussed for practical application in optical communication system.

© 2011 OSA

1. Introduction

After its introduction 6 decades ago [1

1. L. V. Radushkevich and V. M. Lukyanovich, “O strukture ugleroda, obrazujucegosja pri termiceskom razlozenii okisi ugleroda na zeleznom kontakte,” Z. Fis. Chim. 26, 88–95 (1952) (“About the structure of carbon formed by thermal decomposition of carbon monoxide on iron substrate,” Journal of Physical Chemistry of Russia).

], research activities on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have increased significantly since early 90’s [2

2. S. Iijima, “Helical microtubules of graphite carbon,” Nature 354(6348), 56–58 (1991). [CrossRef]

] to exploit their unique mechanical, chemical and electronic characteristics [3

3. R. H. Baughman, A. A. Zakhidov, and W. A. de Heer, “Carbon nanotubes--the route toward applications,” Science 297(5582), 787–792 (2002). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5

5. P. Avouris, M. Freitag, and V. Perebeinos, “Carbon-nanotube photonics and optoelectronics,” Nat. Photonics 2(6), 341–350 (2008). [CrossRef]

]. More recently, single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) possessing semiconducting properties [6

6. M. S. Dresselhaus, G. Dresselhaus, and P. Avouris, eds., “Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis, Structure, Properties, and Applications,” Series: Topics in Applied Physics Vol. 80, Springer (2001).

] have attracted great interests in nonlinear optics applications including optical limiting [7

7. P. Chen, X. Wu, X. Sun, J. Lin, W. Ji, and K. L. Tan, “Electronic structure and optical limiting behavior of carbon nanotubes,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 82(12), 2548–2551 (1999). [CrossRef]

], ultrafast optical switching [8

8. Y.-C. Chen, N. R. Raravikar, L. S. Schadler, P. M. Ajayan, Y.-P. Zhao, T.-M. Lu, G.-C. Wang, and X.-C. Zhang, “Ultrafast optical switching properties of single-wall carbon nanotube polymer composites at 1.55 μm,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 81(6), 975–977 (2002). [CrossRef]

] and saturable absorber (SA) [9

9. S. Y. Set, H. Yaguchi, M. Jablonski, Y. Tanaka, Y. Sakakibara, A. Rozhin, M. Tokumoto, H. Kataura, Y. chiba, and K. Kikuchi, in Proc. Optical Fiber Communication Conf. ’03, Atlanta, GA, p. FL2 (2003).

]. Particularly, there have been a number of reports on mode-locking in fiber lasers and solid-state lasers using SWCNTs as a SA [9

9. S. Y. Set, H. Yaguchi, M. Jablonski, Y. Tanaka, Y. Sakakibara, A. Rozhin, M. Tokumoto, H. Kataura, Y. chiba, and K. Kikuchi, in Proc. Optical Fiber Communication Conf. ’03, Atlanta, GA, p. FL2 (2003).

13

13. I. H. Baek, S. Y. Choi, H. W. Lee, W. B. Cho, V. Petrov, A. Agnesi, V. Pasiskevicius, D.-I. Yeom, K. Kim, and F. Rotermund, “Single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber assisted high-power mode-locking of a Ti:sapphire laser,” Opt. Express 19(8), 7833–7838 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] with the advantages of fast recovery time (around 1 ps), wide operation wavelengths (780 nm ~1.9 μm) and easy fabrication compared to the commonly used semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM). Moreover, evanescent wave interaction of laser light with CNT SA provides higher damage threshold and millimeter-length of nonlinear interaction, scaling up the output power in ultrafast fiber lasers [14

14. K. Kieu and M. Mansuripur, “Femtosecond laser pulse generation with a fiber taper embedded in carbon nanotube/polymer composite,” Opt. Lett. 32(15), 2242–2244 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

17

17. J. H. Im, S. Y. Choi, F. Rotermund, and D.-I. Yeom, “All-fiber Er-doped dissipative soliton laser based on evanescent field interaction with carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” Opt. Express 18(21), 22141–22146 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. For the evanescent wave interaction, CNT coated onto the half of a tunable directional coupler [18

18. R. A. Bergh, G. Kotler, and H. J. Shaw, “Single-mode fiber optic directional coupler,” Electron. Lett. 16(7), 260–261 (1980). [CrossRef]

] is easy to fabricate with readily available conventional components and has a robust structure as a stand-alone device.

Passive mode-locking in anomalous dispersion regime of laser cavity has a sech2 solitonic solution [19

19. H. A. Haus, “Theory of modelocking with a fast saturable absorber,” J. Appl. Phys. 46(7), 3049–3058 (1975). [CrossRef]

]. As the pump power increases, the soliton lasers are known to have a multi-pulsing instability due to the soliton energy quantization and saturable gain [20

20. A. B. Grudinin, D. J. Richardson, and D. N. Payne, “Passive harmonic mode locking of a fiber soliton ring laser,” Electron. Lett. 29(21), 1860–1861 (1993). [CrossRef]

25

25. A. Komarov, H. Leblond, and F. Sanchez, “Multistability and hysteresis phenomena in passively mode-locked fiber lasers,” Phys. Rev. A 71(5), 053809 (2005). [CrossRef]

], producing multiple fundamental soliton pulses in one round-trip. The soliton pulses may be bunched, but can also be spaced evenly through the time-dependent gain relaxation process [24

24. J. N. Kutz, “Mode-locked soliton lasers,” SIAM Rev. 48(4), 629–678 (2006). [CrossRef]

] resulting in passive harmonic mode-locking. While typical fiber lasers have tens of MHz repetition rate, its passive harmonic mode-locking can exhibit GHz repetition without extra active modulator. The harmonically mode-locked soliton source can be a potential light source for optical communication and frequency metrology provided that noise performance is satisfactory. Since the first demonstration of this kind of frequency multiplication [20

20. A. B. Grudinin, D. J. Richardson, and D. N. Payne, “Passive harmonic mode locking of a fiber soliton ring laser,” Electron. Lett. 29(21), 1860–1861 (1993). [CrossRef]

], 1.1 W over 2 GHz from the 95.5 MHz fundamental repetition rate was reported through the nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE) method [22

22. D. Panasenko, P. Polynkin, A. Polynkin, J. V. Moloney, M. Mansuripur, and N. Peyghambarian, “Er-Yb femtosecond ring fiber oscillator with 1.1W average power and GHz repetition rates,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 18(7), 853–855 (2006). [CrossRef]

]. More recently, passive harmonic mode-locking of fiber laser using CNT SA was also reported for environmentally stable and self-starting operation compared to the NPE method [23

23. K. Jiang, S. Fu, P. Shum, and C. Lin, “A Wavelength-Switchable Passively Harmonically Mode-Locked Fiber Laser With Low Pumping Threshold Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 22, 11 (2010).

]. However the limited nonlinear interaction of the ferrule-type CNT SA restricts its key performances such as repetition rate (328 MHz), output power (1.16 mW) and noise characteristics including super-mode suppression ratio (SMSR).

In this paper, we report GHz passive harmonic mode-locking of a fiber laser with low noise feature using the evanescent wave interaction with CNT SA. Our scheme enabled the fiber laser to deliver the pulses with 943.16 MHz repetition rate (34th harmonics of 27.74 MHz fundamental repetition rate) with the output power of 18 mW. In particular, it shows superior noise feature, for example, the relative intensity noise (RIN) in-between harmonics was the level of −140 dB/Hz with > 50 dB SMSR. When the 8.3 nm-wide (3dB) optical spectrum of the laser output is spectrum-sliced with an arrayed waveguide grating filter (AWG; 80 GHz 3-dB bandwidth for each channel), the output from single channel maintained a similar noise level with the original one due to the nature of phase locking between longitudinal modes in our laser. This opens up the possibility of using the laser for some wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) communication systems such as passive optical networks (PON). We also found the repetition rate could be increased up to 1.692 GHz by fine adjustment of the polarization state of the laser cavity for the same pump power of 195 mW although the stability, noise and spectral performance was compromised.

2. Experimental setup

Fiber ring laser for passive harmonic mode-locking was built as schematically shown in Fig. 1(a)
Fig. 1 Schematic of (a) mode-locked fiber laser with CNT SA and (b) CNT SA coated onto the half of a tunable directional coupler for evanescent wave interaction.
. A 977-nm laser diode pumped 3-m erbium-doped fiber (EDF) having normal dispersion (D = −20 ps/nm/km) through a WDM coupler. The EDF had a mode field diameter of 6.1 μm and absorption of 11.9 dB/m at around 980 nm. Polarization-insensitive isolator ensured unidirectional operation of the laser. A fused fiber coupler with a 20% output was positioned after the gain medium section and a polarization controller (PC) was inserted for the adjustment of the cavity birefringence. The CNT SA mode-locker shown in Fig. 1(b) was fabricated by spin-coating the SWCNT/PMMA (Poly-methyl methacrylate) mixture on side-polished fiber as described in Ref. [17

17. J. H. Im, S. Y. Choi, F. Rotermund, and D.-I. Yeom, “All-fiber Er-doped dissipative soliton laser based on evanescent field interaction with carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” Opt. Express 18(21), 22141–22146 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. The side-polished fiber having insertion loss less than 0.1 dB had an index matching oil drop test loss of about 20 dB. The fabricated CNT SA had loss ranging from 4.9 dB to 17 dB depending on polarizations at low intensity [17

17. J. H. Im, S. Y. Choi, F. Rotermund, and D.-I. Yeom, “All-fiber Er-doped dissipative soliton laser based on evanescent field interaction with carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” Opt. Express 18(21), 22141–22146 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. The evanescent wave interaction with the CNT over few-mm-long length makes the SA endure high power laser operation, which enables higher-order harmonic mode-locking for applied higher pump power. The total length of the cavity was about 7.2 m and the net dispersion was estimated to be - 0.0145 ps2. In the main experiment, the pulse train at low repetition rate was monitored with a photo-detector (1 GHz bandwidth) and an oscilloscope (500 MHz bandwidth). A radio frequency (RF) spectrum analyzer with 1.8 GHz bandwidth was used for the measurement of laser pulse train at the frequency range up to 1.6 GHz. An optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) measured laser output spectrum with 0.05nm resolution.

3. Experimental results and discussion

Figure 3
Fig. 3 Hysteresis of the harmonic orders (red line: pump increment, blue dash: pump decrement) and output power (black square dot) as a function of applied pump power.
summarizes the harmonic order and the output power of our laser for a given pump power. As we increase the pump power from 7 mW to 195 mW, the number of fundamental soliton pulses in a period was increased stepwise as shown in the red line of Fig. 3. Output power increment is denoted by the black square dot in Fig. 3 for comparison, which exhibits also nearly linear slope indicating uniform soliton energy generation per pulse for each harmonic mode-locking order. We estimated the energy in each soliton pulse for several cases of 20th, 25th, 29th and 34th harmonic mode-locking, and they came out to be uniform between 18.31 ~19.14 pJ with similar optical spectral characteristics. At a low pump power up to about 50 mW, a few different harmonic orders were distinctively observed, and the data in Fig. 3 are the case of most commonly generated one repeatedly observed. Once a stable multi-pulsing is established, its order is maintained to some extent as we decrease the pump power (blue dash in Fig. 3), resulting in hysteresis phenomena due to the soliton stability [21

21. F. Li, P. K. A. Wai, and J. N. Kutz, “Geometrical description of the onset of multi-pulsing in mode-locked laser cavities,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27(10), 2068–2077 (2010). [CrossRef]

, 25

25. A. Komarov, H. Leblond, and F. Sanchez, “Multistability and hysteresis phenomena in passively mode-locked fiber lasers,” Phys. Rev. A 71(5), 053809 (2005). [CrossRef]

]. As described so far, the order of harmonic mode-locking is proportional to the pump power, and at present the harmonic order and corresponding repetition rate is limited by the pump power. The pulse rate can continue to increase until the gain material is bleached by the pump power as long as the performance of the CNT SA is guaranteed. Since our CNT SA was previously used for the laser mode-locking with more than 50 mW output [17

17. J. H. Im, S. Y. Choi, F. Rotermund, and D.-I. Yeom, “All-fiber Er-doped dissipative soliton laser based on evanescent field interaction with carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” Opt. Express 18(21), 22141–22146 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], we expect several GHz repetition rate can be achieved with a highly doped fiber accompanied by sufficient pump power when cavity dispersion is properly managed.

We also measured the noise characteristics of the laser. Using a 3.5 GHz avalanche photodiode (APD) and a 20 GHz RF spectrum analyzer, the RIN values were measured as shown in Fig. 4
Fig. 4 Relative intensity noise of (a) 34th, 943.16 MHz mode-locked pulse (compared with ASE source) in 1.5 GHz span and 10 MHz span (inset) (b) 61st, 1.692 MHz one in 3 GHz span after the change of PC condition.
. As a reference, the noise property of a separate amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source was also measured for comparison. In the measurement, the input power to the APD was set to be same in all measured sources. In case of harmonic mode-locking of 943.16 MHz repetition rate, the RIN value was close to the photodiode noise level at around −140 dB/Hz except at the harmonics of the mode-locked frequency while the ASE source filtered by an AWG with wavelength channel width of 80 GHz (3dB) and Gaussian shape exhibited around −110 dB/Hz in the range from 10 MHz to 1.5 GHz. The RIN level of filtered ASE source is degraded compared to that of original ASE spectrum due to the spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise [26

26. D. Derickson, ed., “Fiber Optic Test and Measurement,” pp.601–604, Prentice Hall (1998).

]. In order to examine the performance of the harmonically mode locked laser as a spectrum sliced source for WDM applications, we sent the laser signal through the same AWG filter. RIN measurement for the single channel output from the AWG yielded similar results as that of the original laser source shown in Fig. 4(a) because of the phase-locked relationship between longitudinal modes of the mode-locked laser. The noise characteristics in low frequency range are displayed in the inset of Fig. 4(a). The noise level measured within 10 MHz span was less than −120 dB/Hz both for the laser and its filtered light source. This laser source can be suitable for WDM-PON communication system [27

27. H.-K. Lee, J.-H. Moon, S.-G. Mun, K.-M. Choi, and C.-H. Lee, “Decision Threshold Control Method for the Optical Receiver of a WDM-PON,” J. Opt. Commun. Netw 2(6), 381–388 (2010). [CrossRef]

]. Finally we found that harmonic order could be further increased by a fine tuning of the PC for a given pump power. Figure 4(b) shows the result of 61st, 1.692 GHz harmonically mode-locked pulse at the pump power of 195 mW. In this case, however, the spectral bandwidth of the laser was reduced to 5.4 nm and the estimated pulse energy was 9.26 pJ. The laser operation is also too sensitive for the polarization state variation to retain long-term stability. There is also some deterioration of RIN level around −120 dB/Hz. We suspect that this behavior originates from polarization-dependent properties of our SA, which might modify fundamental soliton condition of the laser cavity. At present, it is difficult to exactly measure the SA performance that exhibits polarization dependence in our experimental condition. We currently investigate the characterization method of our SA and its optimization condition to achieve higher repetition rate with better noise feature.

4. Conclusion

In summary, we demonstrate passive harmonic mode-locking of soliton fiber laser based on CNT SA interacting with evanescent wave of a laser. With the advantages of high damage threshold and long length of nonlinear interaction in our SA, stable 34th, 943.16 MHz repetition rate and high output power of 18 mW was achieved from the 27.74 MHz fundamental frequency. Side-mode suppression was higher than 50 dB and RIN value was around −140 dB/Hz. Lowered soliton energy through PC adjustment further increased the repetition rate to 61st, 1.692 GHz. The harmonic order can be possibly increased to several GHz with highly doped fiber and sufficient pump power. The outstanding noise performance makes this laser a potential light source for WDM communication systems and frequency metrology.

Acknowledgment

This work was supported partly by the IT R&D program of MKE/IITA (2009-F-049-01), by mid-career Researcher Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST) (2010-0026596) and by Basic Science Research Program through the NRF funded by the MEST (2009-0069835, 2010-0011015). S. Y. Choi and F. Rotermund have been supported by NRF of Korea (2011-0017494) funded by MEST.

References and links

1.

L. V. Radushkevich and V. M. Lukyanovich, “O strukture ugleroda, obrazujucegosja pri termiceskom razlozenii okisi ugleroda na zeleznom kontakte,” Z. Fis. Chim. 26, 88–95 (1952) (“About the structure of carbon formed by thermal decomposition of carbon monoxide on iron substrate,” Journal of Physical Chemistry of Russia).

2.

S. Iijima, “Helical microtubules of graphite carbon,” Nature 354(6348), 56–58 (1991). [CrossRef]

3.

R. H. Baughman, A. A. Zakhidov, and W. A. de Heer, “Carbon nanotubes--the route toward applications,” Science 297(5582), 787–792 (2002). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

P. M. Ajayan, “Nanotubes from Carbon,” Chem. Rev. 99(7), 1787–1800 (1999). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

P. Avouris, M. Freitag, and V. Perebeinos, “Carbon-nanotube photonics and optoelectronics,” Nat. Photonics 2(6), 341–350 (2008). [CrossRef]

6.

M. S. Dresselhaus, G. Dresselhaus, and P. Avouris, eds., “Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis, Structure, Properties, and Applications,” Series: Topics in Applied Physics Vol. 80, Springer (2001).

7.

P. Chen, X. Wu, X. Sun, J. Lin, W. Ji, and K. L. Tan, “Electronic structure and optical limiting behavior of carbon nanotubes,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 82(12), 2548–2551 (1999). [CrossRef]

8.

Y.-C. Chen, N. R. Raravikar, L. S. Schadler, P. M. Ajayan, Y.-P. Zhao, T.-M. Lu, G.-C. Wang, and X.-C. Zhang, “Ultrafast optical switching properties of single-wall carbon nanotube polymer composites at 1.55 μm,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 81(6), 975–977 (2002). [CrossRef]

9.

S. Y. Set, H. Yaguchi, M. Jablonski, Y. Tanaka, Y. Sakakibara, A. Rozhin, M. Tokumoto, H. Kataura, Y. chiba, and K. Kikuchi, in Proc. Optical Fiber Communication Conf. ’03, Atlanta, GA, p. FL2 (2003).

10.

W. B. Cho, J. H. Yim, S. Y. Choi, S. Lee, U. Griebner, V. Petrov, and F. Rotermund, “Mode-locked self-starting Cr:forsterite laser using a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” Opt. Lett. 33(21), 2449–2451 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

S. Kivistö, T. Hakulinen, A. Kaskela, B. Aitchison, D. P. Brown, A. G. Nasibulin, E. I. Kauppinen, A. Härkönen, and O. G. Okhotnikov, “Carbon nanotube films for ultrafast broadband technology,” Opt. Express 17(4), 2358–2363 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

J. Wang, Y. Chen, and W. J. Blau, “Carbon nanotubes and nanotube composites for nonlinear optical devices,” J. Mater. Chem. 19(40), 7425–7443 (2009). [CrossRef]

13.

I. H. Baek, S. Y. Choi, H. W. Lee, W. B. Cho, V. Petrov, A. Agnesi, V. Pasiskevicius, D.-I. Yeom, K. Kim, and F. Rotermund, “Single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber assisted high-power mode-locking of a Ti:sapphire laser,” Opt. Express 19(8), 7833–7838 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

K. Kieu and M. Mansuripur, “Femtosecond laser pulse generation with a fiber taper embedded in carbon nanotube/polymer composite,” Opt. Lett. 32(15), 2242–2244 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

15.

Y. W. Song, S. Yamashita, C. S. Goh, and S. Y. Set, “Carbon nanotube mode lockers with enhanced nonlinearity via evanescent field interaction in D-shaped fibers,” Opt. Lett. 32(2), 148–150 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

S. Y. Choi, F. Rotermund, H. Jung, K. Oh, and D.-I. Yeom, “Femtosecond mode-locked fiber laser employing a hollow optical fiber filled with carbon nanotube dispersion as saturable absorber,” Opt. Express 17(24), 21788–21793 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

17.

J. H. Im, S. Y. Choi, F. Rotermund, and D.-I. Yeom, “All-fiber Er-doped dissipative soliton laser based on evanescent field interaction with carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” Opt. Express 18(21), 22141–22146 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

18.

R. A. Bergh, G. Kotler, and H. J. Shaw, “Single-mode fiber optic directional coupler,” Electron. Lett. 16(7), 260–261 (1980). [CrossRef]

19.

H. A. Haus, “Theory of modelocking with a fast saturable absorber,” J. Appl. Phys. 46(7), 3049–3058 (1975). [CrossRef]

20.

A. B. Grudinin, D. J. Richardson, and D. N. Payne, “Passive harmonic mode locking of a fiber soliton ring laser,” Electron. Lett. 29(21), 1860–1861 (1993). [CrossRef]

21.

F. Li, P. K. A. Wai, and J. N. Kutz, “Geometrical description of the onset of multi-pulsing in mode-locked laser cavities,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27(10), 2068–2077 (2010). [CrossRef]

22.

D. Panasenko, P. Polynkin, A. Polynkin, J. V. Moloney, M. Mansuripur, and N. Peyghambarian, “Er-Yb femtosecond ring fiber oscillator with 1.1W average power and GHz repetition rates,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 18(7), 853–855 (2006). [CrossRef]

23.

K. Jiang, S. Fu, P. Shum, and C. Lin, “A Wavelength-Switchable Passively Harmonically Mode-Locked Fiber Laser With Low Pumping Threshold Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 22, 11 (2010).

24.

J. N. Kutz, “Mode-locked soliton lasers,” SIAM Rev. 48(4), 629–678 (2006). [CrossRef]

25.

A. Komarov, H. Leblond, and F. Sanchez, “Multistability and hysteresis phenomena in passively mode-locked fiber lasers,” Phys. Rev. A 71(5), 053809 (2005). [CrossRef]

26.

D. Derickson, ed., “Fiber Optic Test and Measurement,” pp.601–604, Prentice Hall (1998).

27.

H.-K. Lee, J.-H. Moon, S.-G. Mun, K.-M. Choi, and C.-H. Lee, “Decision Threshold Control Method for the Optical Receiver of a WDM-PON,” J. Opt. Commun. Netw 2(6), 381–388 (2010). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(140.3510) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, fiber
(140.4050) Lasers and laser optics : Mode-locked lasers
(160.4330) Materials : Nonlinear optical materials

ToC Category:
Lasers and Laser Optics

History
Original Manuscript: July 28, 2011
Revised Manuscript: September 5, 2011
Manuscript Accepted: September 11, 2011
Published: September 23, 2011

Citation
Chang Su Jun, Ju Hee Im, Sang Hwa Yoo, Sun Young Choi, Fabian Rotermund, Dong-Il Yeom, and Byoung Yoon Kim, "Low noise GHz passive harmonic mode-locking of soliton fiber laser using evanescent wave interaction with carbon nanotubes," Opt. Express 19, 19775-19780 (2011)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-19-20-19775


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References

  1. L. V. Radushkevich and V. M. Lukyanovich, “O strukture ugleroda, obrazujucegosja pri termiceskom razlozenii okisi ugleroda na zeleznom kontakte,” Z. Fis. Chim.26, 88–95 (1952) (“About the structure of carbon formed by thermal decomposition of carbon monoxide on iron substrate,” Journal of Physical Chemistry of Russia).
  2. S. Iijima, “Helical microtubules of graphite carbon,” Nature354(6348), 56–58 (1991). [CrossRef]
  3. R. H. Baughman, A. A. Zakhidov, and W. A. de Heer, “Carbon nanotubes--the route toward applications,” Science297(5582), 787–792 (2002). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. P. M. Ajayan, “Nanotubes from Carbon,” Chem. Rev.99(7), 1787–1800 (1999). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. P. Avouris, M. Freitag, and V. Perebeinos, “Carbon-nanotube photonics and optoelectronics,” Nat. Photonics2(6), 341–350 (2008). [CrossRef]
  6. M. S. Dresselhaus, G. Dresselhaus, and P. Avouris, eds., “Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis, Structure, Properties, and Applications,” Series: Topics in Applied Physics Vol. 80, Springer (2001).
  7. P. Chen, X. Wu, X. Sun, J. Lin, W. Ji, and K. L. Tan, “Electronic structure and optical limiting behavior of carbon nanotubes,” Phys. Rev. Lett.82(12), 2548–2551 (1999). [CrossRef]
  8. Y.-C. Chen, N. R. Raravikar, L. S. Schadler, P. M. Ajayan, Y.-P. Zhao, T.-M. Lu, G.-C. Wang, and X.-C. Zhang, “Ultrafast optical switching properties of single-wall carbon nanotube polymer composites at 1.55 μm,” Appl. Phys. Lett.81(6), 975–977 (2002). [CrossRef]
  9. S. Y. Set, H. Yaguchi, M. Jablonski, Y. Tanaka, Y. Sakakibara, A. Rozhin, M. Tokumoto, H. Kataura, Y. chiba, and K. Kikuchi, in Proc. Optical Fiber Communication Conf. ’03, Atlanta, GA, p. FL2 (2003).
  10. W. B. Cho, J. H. Yim, S. Y. Choi, S. Lee, U. Griebner, V. Petrov, and F. Rotermund, “Mode-locked self-starting Cr:forsterite laser using a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” Opt. Lett.33(21), 2449–2451 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. S. Kivistö, T. Hakulinen, A. Kaskela, B. Aitchison, D. P. Brown, A. G. Nasibulin, E. I. Kauppinen, A. Härkönen, and O. G. Okhotnikov, “Carbon nanotube films for ultrafast broadband technology,” Opt. Express17(4), 2358–2363 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  12. J. Wang, Y. Chen, and W. J. Blau, “Carbon nanotubes and nanotube composites for nonlinear optical devices,” J. Mater. Chem.19(40), 7425–7443 (2009). [CrossRef]
  13. I. H. Baek, S. Y. Choi, H. W. Lee, W. B. Cho, V. Petrov, A. Agnesi, V. Pasiskevicius, D.-I. Yeom, K. Kim, and F. Rotermund, “Single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber assisted high-power mode-locking of a Ti:sapphire laser,” Opt. Express19(8), 7833–7838 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  14. K. Kieu and M. Mansuripur, “Femtosecond laser pulse generation with a fiber taper embedded in carbon nanotube/polymer composite,” Opt. Lett.32(15), 2242–2244 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
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