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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 19, Iss. 22 — Oct. 24, 2011
  • pp: 21135–21144
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Fabrication and supercontinuum generation in dispersion flattened bismuth microstructured optical fiber

Wen Qi Zhang, Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Tanya M. Monro, and Shahraam Afshar V.  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 19, Issue 22, pp. 21135-21144 (2011)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.19.021135


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Abstract

We fabricated a microstructured optical fiber with a dispersion profile that, according to calculations, is near-zero and flat, with 3 zero dispersion wavelengths in the mid-IR. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of the fabrication of such a fiber. Simulations of multimode supercontinuum generation were performed using a simplified approach. Strong agreement between experiments and simulations were observed using this approach.

© 2011 OSA

1. Introduction

The effect of higher order modes (HOMs) on the generation of SC has been explored previously, and, for example, HOMs have been used to generate UV spectral content [9

9. J. Price, T. Monro, K. Furusawa, W. Belardi, J. Baggett, S. Coyle, C. Netti, J. Baumberg, R. Paschotta, and D. Richardson, “UV generation in a pure-silica holey fiber,” Appl. Phys. B 77, 291–298 (2003). [CrossRef]

]. A multimode pulse propagation model has also been developed [10

10. F. Poletti and P. Horak, “Description of ultrashort pulse propagation in multimode optical fibers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25, 1645–1654 (2008). [CrossRef]

,11

11. F. Poletti and P. Horak, “Dynamics of femtosecond supercontinuum generation in multimode fibers,” Opt. Express 17, 6134–6147 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] to investigate the dynamics of femtosecond SC generation in multimode fibers. In Ref. [9

9. J. Price, T. Monro, K. Furusawa, W. Belardi, J. Baggett, S. Coyle, C. Netti, J. Baumberg, R. Paschotta, and D. Richardson, “UV generation in a pure-silica holey fiber,” Appl. Phys. B 77, 291–298 (2003). [CrossRef]

], measured SC spectra were compared to simulations for both fundamental and first high order modes respectively, and while qualitative agreement was obtained, these simulations could not accuruately describe the experiments over a broad spectral range. The multimode pulse propagation model used in Ref. [10

10. F. Poletti and P. Horak, “Description of ultrashort pulse propagation in multimode optical fibers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25, 1645–1654 (2008). [CrossRef]

] considered not only the broadening in each mode but also the interactions between modes, which enabled better agreement between predictions and experiments [12

12. R. T. Chapman, T. J. Butcher, P. Horak, F. Poletti, J. G. Frey, and W. S. Brocklesby, “Modal effects on pump-pulse propagation in an ar-filled capillary,” Opt. Express 18, 13279–13284 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], with reasonable agreement over a spectral width approximately 200 nm.

Here we explore SC generation in a multimode fiber using an intermediate approach that considers the supercontinuum generated by multiple modes but without using a multimode pulse propagation model. Using this simple approach, good agreement is observed between experimental and simulation results over a wavelength range from 1.2 ∼ 2.2 μm. In addition, we report the fabrication details of a bismuth glass fiber designed to have three ZDWs and the experimental results of SC generation within this fiber. We find that large SC output bandwidth can be easily achieved in this fiber for a large range of pumping wavelengths.

2. Fabrication

The design of the structure has also been simplified from the structure proposed in Ref. [8

8. W. Q. Zhang, S. Afshar V., and T. M. Monro, “A genetic algorithm based approach to fiber design for high coherence and large bandwidth supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Express 17, 19311–19327 (2009). [CrossRef]

] to reduce the complexity for fabrication purposes. The outer-most ring of the structure (Fig. 1) is removed due to its negligible effects on dispersion from our observation in simulations. The diameter of the inner holes was set to an average value of 0.36 μm (in the original design there were two sets of hole sizes 0.32 and 0.4 μm).

Fig. 1 Designed fiber structure, core diameter 6.4 μm, inner ring diameter 3.3 μm, inner hole diameter 0.40 and 0.32 μm.

Fig. 2 Fiber preform and SEM image. Bismuth glass from Asahi Glass Co.

Note that in the preform (Fig. 2a) that the ring of inner six holes are slightly non-circular, and are somewhat offset within the suspended core region. This distortion is transferred into the fabricated fiber (Fig. 2b). The core (defined as the area enclosed by the outer six holes) has a diameter of approximately 6.4 μm, as designed. The radius of the inner ring of holes (1.75 μm) and the diameter of the inner holes (0.4 μm) are about 10% larger than the designed sizes.

The fabricated fiber is close to the design. To study the effect of the slight distortions in the fabricated fiber on the nonlinearity and dispersion profile, calculations based on the SEM images of the fiber and simulations of ultra-short pulse propagation are described as a prelude to experimental measurements on this fiber in the following section.

3. Modeling

3.1. Ideal structure with Bismuth glass

The dispersion and nonlinearity profiles of the fundamental mode of the bismuth fiber are calculated and plotted in Fig. 3.

Fig. 3 Nonlinearity and dispersion profiles of the fundamental modes of the ideal bismuth fiber.

A finite element method package COMSOL was used for solving the eigenmodes of the fiber. We also employed the Sellmeier equation of the glass, provided by Asahi Glass Co., and the nonlinear refractive index n2 into the calculation. The same value of n2 was also used for other wavelengths since the change in n2 as a function of wavelength is small. The nonlinearity profile is similar to that of the designed fiber [8

8. W. Q. Zhang, S. Afshar V., and T. M. Monro, “A genetic algorithm based approach to fiber design for high coherence and large bandwidth supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Express 17, 19311–19327 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. The dispersion profile of this fiber no longer show three ZDWs, however, it is flat and slightly negative in value, which it more preferred. The dispersion profile has a flat region from approximately 1.8 to 3.2 μm with a maximum of −3 ps/km/nm around 2.1 μm and a minimum of −11 ps/km/nm around 2.9 μm.

3.2. The fabricated structure

The nonlinearity and dispersion profiles of the fabricated fiber were also calculated using the SEM image of the fabricated fiber. The calculated nonlinearity and dispersion profiles of the fiber are shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 4 Nonlinearity and dispersion profiles of the fiber modes. The thick sold lines correspond to fundamental modes, dashed lines correspond to the six first high order modes, dotted lines correspond to eight further higher order modes.

In Fig. 4, the thick green and blue lines show the results for the orthogonal polarized fundamental modes. The nonlinearity is approximately 250 W−1km−1 at 2 μm which is approximately 43% larger than for the original design (175W−1km−1) [8

8. W. Q. Zhang, S. Afshar V., and T. M. Monro, “A genetic algorithm based approach to fiber design for high coherence and large bandwidth supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Express 17, 19311–19327 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. This is mainly due to reduced mode area caused by the ∼10% increase in the diameter of the inner six holes, which increases the index contrast between the inner core and the first ring of holes. The calculated dispersion of the fabricated fiber shows three ZDWs. This result is not surprising because the dispersion profile of the ideal structure is flat and close to zero, and has a minimum and a maximum in the wavelength range of interest. Thus a shift in this dispersion profile in the right direction due to the distortion moves parts of the profile into anomalous regime resulting in 3 ZDWs. The calculated 3 ZDWs are located at 1.7, 2.7 and 3.6 μm. The maximum difference in the dispersion values over the range of 1.7 and 3.6 μm is only 20 ps/nm/km.

As a result of the slight structural asymmetry present in the fabricated fiber, birefringence is observed in the form of the difference between the two curves in the nonlinearity plot (|Δneff| = 2 × 10−4 at 1.7 μm calculated based on the SEM image). Note that there is negligible difference in the dispersion profiles of the two fundamental modes (two polarizations) as shown in the figure. However, the dispersion and nonlinearity profiles of the high-order modes (dashed lines) exhibit rather different characteristics. As shown in Fig. 4a and 4b, the nonlinearity profiles of all high order modes are lower than the fundamental ones. The first ZDWs of all high order modes (≤∼1500 nm) are shorter than those of fundamental modes, therefore modulation instability (MI) and soliton fission processes can be expected if the fiber is pumped at wavelengths longer than 1500 nm.

Applying a pulse propagation method for the above fiber including multiple modes can be computational intensive, and requires the solution of tens of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations [1

1. G. Agrawal, Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 3rd ed. (Academic Press, 2001).

]. Here, we consider an alternative approach in which we make two assumptions. Firstly, in experiments the alignment of the laser beam and the fiber is optimized such that the majority of the light is coupled into the fundamental mode along one of the principle axes. Therefore the nonlinear pulse broadening is dominated by the fundamental mode. Secondly, if we consider that (1) there are temporal walk-off between pulses in high order modes and fundamental mode (total walk-off occurs within 2 mm in our fiber according to calculations), (2) the likelihood of achieving good phase matching condition are low for certain nonlinear effects such as four-wave mixing (FWM) and cross-phase modulation (XPM), (3) we only simulate pulse propagation for a short length ( 2 cm) in order to observe early stage of SC generation., then it is reasonable to assume that nonlinear cross-talk between modes including FWM and XPM do not have significant effects on the fundamental mode. Therefore we ignore these effects in the simulations. Furthermore, the fiber we used in the experiments is highly birefringent, so the coherent coupling is also ignored. With these assumptions, we write that the total electric field at the fiber output as a superposition of the electric fields of all modes. The fraction of pulse power in each mode is then determined by the coupling between the input beam and that mode. We calculate the coupling efficiency between an input beam and the modes based on the mode field pattern calculated from COMSOL. The coupling efficiency can be described by Eq. (1) which is a simplified form derived based on Ref. [18

18. A. W. Snyder, “Coupled-mode theory for optical fibers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 62, 1267–1277 (1972). [CrossRef]

]. Approximations that are implicit within this definition include the assumption that the modes are purely transverse and there is no coupling to radiation modes.
ηn=|EinEn*da|2|Ein|2|En|2da
(1)
In Eq. (1), ηn is the coupling efficiency of n-th mode, Ein is the electric field of the input beam and En is the electric field of n-th mode inside the fiber. Assuming the input field distribution is Gaussian, the coupling efficiencies from the input field to the different modes can be found for a range of input beam diameters (focal spot size in experiments) as shown in Fig. 5a.

Fig. 5 (a) Coupling efficiencies for different modes vs. beam diameter of the incident Gaussian beam. (b) Average coupling efficiencies over input beam diameters from 2 to 16 μm.

The first 16 modes contain the majority (∼94%) of energy of the input beam that is coupled in the fiber (calculated based on Fig. 5b) where the coupling efficient of each mode is averaged over input beam diameters from 2 to 16 μm. We simulated the pulse propagation for each of these modes independently with power determined by the coupling coefficients and for a range of input beam diameters. Following this, the electric fields of all the modes at the output of the fiber are superimposed. The superimposed electric fields interfere with each other, resulting in changes in the generated spectra.

During the experiments, the only confirmation of good alignment is the intensity distribution output on the IR camera. With the 10% power fluctuation in the laser (see Section 4), large NA of the fiber (≳ 0.5, which indicates short focal length) and possible beam diameter fluctuation, it is difficult to know the exact spot size on the fiber tip, especially for pump wavelengths longer than 1.7 μm due to the coupling difficulties which will be discussed later. Therefore, the simulated spectra were compared to the measured ones and only the best fit was selected as the delegates.

In the simulations, 100-fs 10-kW peak power hyperbolic secant pump pulses were used. The coupling efficient was set to 25% according to measurements. The propagation length is set to 2 cm. The fiber loss is 4 dB/m. Since we used only 2 cm of fiber, the loss was not included in the simulation. Simulations were carried out for a range of different pump wavelengths. The following wavelengths are chosen by considering the dispersion profile of the fundamental mode: a pump wavelength of 1300 nm is in normal dispersion region, pump wavelengths of 1550 and 1650 nm are in normal dispersion region but close to ZDW, and a pump wavelength of 1800 nm lies in the anomalous dispersion region. The output of the pulse propagation model is shown in Fig. 6a. As expected, when the pump wavelength is in normal dispersion region, the output spectrum is smooth and narrow since the broadening is dominated by self-phase modulation only. As the pump wavelength moves towards the first ZDW, the spectral bandwidth become wider and less smooth. This transition in the spectra can be attributed to the change of the dominant nonlinear processes. When the pump wavelength is varied from the normal to anomalous dispersion region, the dominant nonlinear process changes from SPM to MI and solitonal dynamics. Making use of these qualitative differences, we are able to estimate the first zero dispersion wavelength using the experimental data such as, in this case, around 1500 nm or longer since, on one side, spectra are smooth (SPM) and, on the other side, spectra are rough (MI and solitonal dynamics).

Fig. 6 Simulations of SC generation in 2 cm of fiber pumped with 100-fs 10-kW peak power hyperbolic secant pulses with an overall coupling efficiency of 25%. Spectra are normalized to their peak level and offset vertically for easier viewing. (a) Spectra of multimode pulse propagation simulation pumped at 1300 (blue), 1550 (green), 1650 (red) and 1800 (cyan) nm with 100-fs 10-k peak power pulses, (b) SC spectra of the fundamental mode for the same range of pump wavelengths.

The spectral broadening in these simulations is dominated by the fundamental mode as it contains most of the energy. Therefore, despite the multimodeness of the fiber, the single-mode-based design directives of this fiber are still reasonable. Figure 6b shows the spectral output of the fundamental mode only. When the transmission window of the glass is not considered, the broadening of the fundamental modes extends over 4 μm width for almost all the pump wavelengths. This is achieved through the low flat dispersion profile of this fiber. The most significant differences between multimode (Fig. 6a) and single-mode (Fig. 6b) simulations are the peaks around the pump wavelengths [the highest peaks at 1300 (blue), 1550 (green), 1650 (red) and 1800 (cyan) nm]. These peaks are coming from power that coupled into the high order modes. Since the power coupled into the high order modes are low, these is no significant nonlinear processes took place in high order modes. Apart from that, the rest of the spectra are similar to the spectra generated by the fundamental mode alone.

4. Ultra-short pulse experiments

The laser source used in these experiments is a wavelength tunable, 1-kHz repetition rate, 100-fs pulsed laser system (includes Spectra Physics Tsunami Ultrafast Ti:Sapphire Lasers, Spitfire Pro XP Ultrafast Ti:Sapphire Amplifier and TOPAS Automated Ultrafast OPA). This laser exhibits approximately 10% power fluctuation at all wavelengths according to our measurements. Averages of 10,000 pulses are taken for each wavelength point in the measurements. Taking into account the coupling efficiencies achieved in the experiments (approximately 25%), we measured the output spectra for different pump wavelengths as shown in Fig. 7. Due to the fact that this is a multimode fiber, one can not guarantee the coupling is optimized for the fundamental modes by maximizing the output power only. An infrared camera was used to monitor the optimization and ensure that predominantly the fundamental mode was excited. In experiments, 2-cm fiber pieces were used and the peak power of the pump pulses was approximately 10 kW.

Fig. 7 Measured spectra overlaid on the simulation results. Thick blue curves represent measured data and thin red curve represent simulation results

Considering the assumptions described previously, Fig. 7 shows good agreement between simulations (thin red curve) and experiments (thick blue curve), especially for pumping wavelengths shorter than 1700 nm. As we expected, intensive peaks appeared in the measured spectra around the pumping wavelengths which can be attributed to high order modes. The remaining of the spectra correspond principally to the fundamental modes. Wavelengths longer than 1700 nm are difficult to observe using a IR camera (GOODRICH SU320M-1.7RT, wavelength ranging from 0.9 μm to 1.7 μm), therefore the coupling to the fundamental mode is difficult to verify using this camera. However, by aligning the beam using light with wavelength shorter than 1700 nm and gradually increasing the pump wavelength and maximizing the fiber output, we managed to align the fiber, to a certain extend, using the part of light generated through pulse broadening at short wavelengths. Figure 7d shows the spectra from the experiment and simulations pumped at 1800 nm. In this case, the simulation only partially matches with the measured spectrum. Further analysis indicates this was due to poor alignment of input light to the fundamental mode. This is likely to be due to significant contribution from higher order modes.

Figure 7 shows that there is strong agreement between the spectral peaks in simulated and measured spectra. Since the fundamental modes contain most of the energy, this indicates that the SC spectra of the fundamental modes also agrees well with the simulated results (Fig. 6b), which underpin most important physical effects of the spectral broadening. These results confirm that the fabricated fiber has a dispersion profile close to the predicted one which has three ZDWs.

5. Discussion and conclusions

In this paper we fabricated what we believe to be the first bismuth MOF with flat and near-zero dispersion in the mid-IR. According to the calculation, the fabricated fiber has a dispersion profile with three ZDWs in the mid-IR from 1.7 to 3.6 um and a maximum variation of 20 ps/nm/km. Using a simplified approach to include high order modes into the simulations, we simulated the multimode pulse broadening and achieve good agreements with experimental results and therefore the fundamental mode in the fabricated fiber behaves as predicted. The fabrication results described here demonstrate that it is feasible to produce complex fibre cross-sections in soft glass materials for the purpose of dispersion tailoring, and future work will focus on reducing the ∼10% increase in the inner hole diameters which would significantly reduce the number of modes in the fiber and improve the coupling to the fundamental mode.

A better coupling efficiency model can be used to include cladding modes and radiation modes and a finite difference method can be applied at the fiber interface to solve coupling for different phase front, angle and shape of the input beams. It is also worth using a multimode pulse propagation model to predict SC generations in the fiber which will facilitate deeper insight into the underlying physics. Also, recent work [19

19. S. Afshar V. and T. M. Monro, “A full vectorial model for pulse propagation in emerging waveguides with subwavelength structures part i: Kerr nonlinearity,” Opt. Express 17, 2298–2318 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 20

20. T. X. Tran and F. Biancalana, “An accurate envelope equation for lightpropagation in photonic nanowires: newnonlinear effects,” Opt. Express 17, 17934–17949 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] have pointed out that a vectorial form of nonlinear Schrödinger equation is necessary when high index material and sub-wavelength features are involved in a fiber. Developing such model with multimode capability is critical for future work.

The results here demonstrate the successful fabrication of a bismuth glass microstructured optical fiber with a flat low dispersion, and investigations of SC generation (up to 2.6 μm) through simulation and experiment pave the way to measurements of SC beyond 2.6 μm and exploring the relationship between the dispersion and nonlinear characteristics of these fibers and the characteristics of the generated supercontinuum. Direct measurement of dispersion in the mid-IR would be useful to support the further development of these fibers.

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by ARC LIEF grant ( LE0989747) and ARC DP grant ( DP110104247). We also would like to acknowledge ARC funding support (DP110104247), Naoki Sugimoto ASAHI GLASS CO., LTD for providing the bismuth glass and Tanya M. Monro acknowledges the support of an ARC Federation Fellowship.

References and links

1.

G. Agrawal, Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 3rd ed. (Academic Press, 2001).

2.

J. M. Dudley, G. Genty, and S. Coen, “Supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fiber,” Rev. Mod. Phys. 78, 1135–1184 (2006). [CrossRef]

3.

L. J. Lu and A. Safaai-Jazi, “Analysis and design of multi-clad single mode fibers with three zero-dispersion wavelengths,” in Proc. IEEE Southeastcon 1989, 12B5 (1989).

4.

A. Ferrando, E. Silvestre, P. Andres, J. Miret, and M. Andres, “Designing the properties of dispersion-flattened photonic crystal fibers,” Opt. Express 9, 687–697 (2001). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

K. Saitoh, M. Koshiba, T. Hasegawa, and E. Sasaoka, “Chromatic dispersion control in photonic crystal fibers: application to ultra-flattened dispersion,” Opt. Express 11, 843–852 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

R. Mehra and P. K. Inaniya, “Design of photonic crystal fiber for ultra low dispersion in wide wavelength range with three zero dispersion wavelengths,” AIP Conference Proceedings1324, 175–177 (2010). [CrossRef]

7.

L. Zhang, Y. Yue, R. G. Beausoleil, and A. E. Willner, “Flattened dispersion in silicon slot waveguides,” Opt. Express 18, 20529–20534 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

W. Q. Zhang, S. Afshar V., and T. M. Monro, “A genetic algorithm based approach to fiber design for high coherence and large bandwidth supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Express 17, 19311–19327 (2009). [CrossRef]

9.

J. Price, T. Monro, K. Furusawa, W. Belardi, J. Baggett, S. Coyle, C. Netti, J. Baumberg, R. Paschotta, and D. Richardson, “UV generation in a pure-silica holey fiber,” Appl. Phys. B 77, 291–298 (2003). [CrossRef]

10.

F. Poletti and P. Horak, “Description of ultrashort pulse propagation in multimode optical fibers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25, 1645–1654 (2008). [CrossRef]

11.

F. Poletti and P. Horak, “Dynamics of femtosecond supercontinuum generation in multimode fibers,” Opt. Express 17, 6134–6147 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

R. T. Chapman, T. J. Butcher, P. Horak, F. Poletti, J. G. Frey, and W. S. Brocklesby, “Modal effects on pump-pulse propagation in an ar-filled capillary,” Opt. Express 18, 13279–13284 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

H. Ebendorff-Heidepriem, P. Petropoulos, S. Asimakis, V. Finazzi, R. Moore, K. Frampton, F. Koizumi, D. Richardson, and T. Monro, “Bismuth glass holey fibers with high nonlinearity,” Opt. Express 12, 5082–5087 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

T. M. Monro and H. Ebendorff-Heidepriem, “Progress in microstructured optical fibers,” Annu. Rev. Mater. Res. 36, 467–495 (2006). [CrossRef]

15.

S. Afshar V., W. Q. Zhang, H. Ebendorff-Heidepriem, and T. M. Monro, “Small core optical waveguides are more nonlinear than expected: experimental confirmation,” Opt. Lett. 34, 3577–3579 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

M. Sheik-Bahae, A. Said, T. Wei, D. Hagan, and E. Van Stryland, “Sensitive measurement of optical nonlinearities using a single beam,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 26, 760–769 (1990). [CrossRef]

17.

H. Ebendorff-Heidepriem and T. M. Monro, “Extrusion of complex preforms for microstructured optical fibers,” Opt. Express 15, 15086–15092 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

18.

A. W. Snyder, “Coupled-mode theory for optical fibers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 62, 1267–1277 (1972). [CrossRef]

19.

S. Afshar V. and T. M. Monro, “A full vectorial model for pulse propagation in emerging waveguides with subwavelength structures part i: Kerr nonlinearity,” Opt. Express 17, 2298–2318 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

20.

T. X. Tran and F. Biancalana, “An accurate envelope equation for lightpropagation in photonic nanowires: newnonlinear effects,” Opt. Express 17, 17934–17949 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

OCIS Codes
(060.2280) Fiber optics and optical communications : Fiber design and fabrication
(060.4370) Fiber optics and optical communications : Nonlinear optics, fibers
(060.7140) Fiber optics and optical communications : Ultrafast processes in fibers
(260.2030) Physical optics : Dispersion
(260.3060) Physical optics : Infrared
(060.4005) Fiber optics and optical communications : Microstructured fibers
(320.6629) Ultrafast optics : Supercontinuum generation

ToC Category:
Lasers and Laser Optics

History
Original Manuscript: August 8, 2011
Revised Manuscript: September 26, 2011
Manuscript Accepted: September 27, 2011
Published: October 10, 2011

Citation
Wen Qi Zhang, Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Tanya M. Monro, and Shahraam Afshar V., "Fabrication and supercontinuum generation in dispersion flattened bismuth microstructured optical fiber," Opt. Express 19, 21135-21144 (2011)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-19-22-21135


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References

  1. G. Agrawal, Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 3rd ed. (Academic Press, 2001).
  2. J. M. Dudley, G. Genty, and S. Coen, “Supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fiber,” Rev. Mod. Phys.78, 1135–1184 (2006). [CrossRef]
  3. L. J. Lu and A. Safaai-Jazi, “Analysis and design of multi-clad single mode fibers with three zero-dispersion wavelengths,” in Proc. IEEE Southeastcon 1989, 12B5 (1989).
  4. A. Ferrando, E. Silvestre, P. Andres, J. Miret, and M. Andres, “Designing the properties of dispersion-flattened photonic crystal fibers,” Opt. Express9, 687–697 (2001). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. K. Saitoh, M. Koshiba, T. Hasegawa, and E. Sasaoka, “Chromatic dispersion control in photonic crystal fibers: application to ultra-flattened dispersion,” Opt. Express11, 843–852 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. R. Mehra and P. K. Inaniya, “Design of photonic crystal fiber for ultra low dispersion in wide wavelength range with three zero dispersion wavelengths,” AIP Conference Proceedings1324, 175–177 (2010). [CrossRef]
  7. L. Zhang, Y. Yue, R. G. Beausoleil, and A. E. Willner, “Flattened dispersion in silicon slot waveguides,” Opt. Express18, 20529–20534 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  8. W. Q. Zhang, S. Afshar V., and T. M. Monro, “A genetic algorithm based approach to fiber design for high coherence and large bandwidth supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Express17, 19311–19327 (2009). [CrossRef]
  9. J. Price, T. Monro, K. Furusawa, W. Belardi, J. Baggett, S. Coyle, C. Netti, J. Baumberg, R. Paschotta, and D. Richardson, “UV generation in a pure-silica holey fiber,” Appl. Phys. B77, 291–298 (2003). [CrossRef]
  10. F. Poletti and P. Horak, “Description of ultrashort pulse propagation in multimode optical fibers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B25, 1645–1654 (2008). [CrossRef]
  11. F. Poletti and P. Horak, “Dynamics of femtosecond supercontinuum generation in multimode fibers,” Opt. Express17, 6134–6147 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  12. R. T. Chapman, T. J. Butcher, P. Horak, F. Poletti, J. G. Frey, and W. S. Brocklesby, “Modal effects on pump-pulse propagation in an ar-filled capillary,” Opt. Express18, 13279–13284 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. H. Ebendorff-Heidepriem, P. Petropoulos, S. Asimakis, V. Finazzi, R. Moore, K. Frampton, F. Koizumi, D. Richardson, and T. Monro, “Bismuth glass holey fibers with high nonlinearity,” Opt. Express12, 5082–5087 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  14. T. M. Monro and H. Ebendorff-Heidepriem, “Progress in microstructured optical fibers,” Annu. Rev. Mater. Res.36, 467–495 (2006). [CrossRef]
  15. S. Afshar V., W. Q. Zhang, H. Ebendorff-Heidepriem, and T. M. Monro, “Small core optical waveguides are more nonlinear than expected: experimental confirmation,” Opt. Lett.34, 3577–3579 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  16. M. Sheik-Bahae, A. Said, T. Wei, D. Hagan, and E. Van Stryland, “Sensitive measurement of optical nonlinearities using a single beam,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron.26, 760–769 (1990). [CrossRef]
  17. H. Ebendorff-Heidepriem and T. M. Monro, “Extrusion of complex preforms for microstructured optical fibers,” Opt. Express15, 15086–15092 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  18. A. W. Snyder, “Coupled-mode theory for optical fibers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am.62, 1267–1277 (1972). [CrossRef]
  19. S. Afshar V. and T. M. Monro, “A full vectorial model for pulse propagation in emerging waveguides with subwavelength structures part i: Kerr nonlinearity,” Opt. Express17, 2298–2318 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  20. T. X. Tran and F. Biancalana, “An accurate envelope equation for lightpropagation in photonic nanowires: newnonlinear effects,” Opt. Express17, 17934–17949 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

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