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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 19, Iss. 22 — Oct. 24, 2011
  • pp: 21199–21204
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5×200Gbit/s all-optical OFDM transmission using a single optical source and optical Fourier transform real-time detection

Hongwei Chen, Xingyao Gu, Feifei Yin, Minghua Chen, and Shizhong Xie  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 19, Issue 22, pp. 21199-21204 (2011)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.19.021199


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Abstract

An all-optical sampling OFDM scheme using PolMux-DQPSK format with single source is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. 5 × 200Gb/s AOS-OFDM signal with spectral efficiency of 3.07bit/s/Hz is successfully transmitted over an 80km SMF link with real-time detection by optical Fourier transform filters. Furthermore, this scheme can coexist with traditional WDM channels and be a promising technique for seamless upgrade of transmission date rate.

© 2011 OSA

1. Introduction

Optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (O-OFDM) method has widely been considered as one of the most promising technology for future high-speed optical communication system [1

1. H. Bao and W. Shieh, “Transmission simulation of coherent optical OFDM signals in WDM systems,” Opt. Express 15(8), 4410–4418 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], since its high spectral efficiency, robustness against both chromatic dispersion(CD) and polarization mode dispersion (PMD), and natural compatibility with digital signal processing (DSP)-based implementation [2

2. J. Armstrong, “OFDM for optical communications,” J. Lightwave Technol. 27(3), 189–204 (2009). [CrossRef]

4

4. N. Cvijetic, L. Xu, and T. Wang, “Adaptive PMD compensation using OFDM in long-haul 10Gb/s DWDM systems,” in Proc. 2007 IEEE/OSA Opt. Fiber Commun. Conf. (OFC/NFOEC), paper OTuA5.

]. Through the use of coherent detection, the line rate of demonstrated OFDM has rapidly advanced to 100Gb/s [5

5. W. Shieh, Q. Yang, and Y. Ma, “107 Gb/s coherent optical OFDM transmission over 1000-km SSMF fiber using orthogonal band multiplexing,” Opt. Express 16(9), 6378–6386 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,6

6. S. L. Jansen, I. Morita, T. C. W. Schenk, and H. Tanaka, “121.9-Gb/s PDM-OFDM transmission with 2-b/s/Hz spectral efficiency over 1000 km of SSMF,” J. Lightwave Technol. 27(3), 177–188 (2009). [CrossRef]

] and much lately to 1Tb/s [7

7. Y. Ma, Q. Yang, Y. Tang, S. Chen, and W. Shieh, “1-Tb/s single-channel coherent optical OFDM transmission over 600-km SSMF fiber with subwavelength bandwidth access,” Opt. Express 17(11), 9421–9427 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. However these aforementioned systems require higher implementation complexity compared with direct-detection OFDM (DDO-OFDM), such as narrow line-width lasers for receiver-end local oscillators (LO), complex frequency offset and phase noise compensation DSP algorithms. These components restrict the symbol rates of several Gb/s due to the electrical bottleneck of digital-to-analog/analog-to-digital converter and digital signal processor. Furthermore most of these published experiments are off-line [5

5. W. Shieh, Q. Yang, and Y. Ma, “107 Gb/s coherent optical OFDM transmission over 1000-km SSMF fiber using orthogonal band multiplexing,” Opt. Express 16(9), 6378–6386 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9

9. K. Takiguchi, M. Oguma, H. Takahashi, and A. Mori, “PLC-based eight-channel OFDM demultiplexer and its demonstration with 160 Gbit/s signal reception,” in Conference on Optical Fiber Communication, OFC, (San Diego, CA, 2010), paper OThB4.

]. At the mean time, a number of real-time transmission systems with G-b/s data rate using electrical implements are demonstrated [10

10. T. Pfau, R. Peveling, V. Herath, S. Hoffmann, C. Wordehoff, O. Adamczyk, M. Porrmann, and R. Noe, “Towards real-time implementation of coherent optical communication,” in Proc. 2009 IEEE/OSA Opt. Fiber Commun. Conf. (OFC/NFOEC), (Optical Society of America, 2009), paper OThJ4.

12

12. R. P. Giddings, E. Hugues-Salas, X. Q. Jin, J. L. Wei, and J. M. Tang, “Experimental demonstration of real-time optical OFDM transmission at 7.5 Gb/s Over 25-km SSMF using a 1-GHz RSOA,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 22(11), 745–747 (2010). [CrossRef]

]. 2Tbit/s multi-banded coherent WDM is realized in [13

13. P. Frascella, N. Mac Suibhne, F. C. Gunning, S. K. Ibrahim, P. Gunning, and A. D. Ellis, “Unrepeatered field transmission of 2 Tbit/s multi-banded coherent WDM over 124 km of installed SMF,” Opt. Express 18(24), 24745–24752 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] with asymmetric Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (AMZI) and a bandpass filter cascaded for subcarrier selection. To realize Tb/s real-time OFDM system, a useful way is shifting the Fourier transform into the optical domain [14

14. A. J. Lowery, “Design of arrayed-waveguide grating routers for use as optical OFDM demultiplexers,” Opt. Express 18(13), 14129–14143 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,15

15. D. Hillerkuss, M. Winter, M. Teschke, A. Marculescu, J. Li, G. Sigurdsson, K. Worms, S. Ben Ezra, N. Narkiss, W. Freude, and J. Leuthold, “Simple all-optical FFT scheme enabling Tbit/s real-time signal processing,” Opt. Express 18(9), 9324–9340 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Recently, a real-time all-optical Fourier transform (OFT) receiver enabled line rate of 10.8Tb/s and 26Tb/s is proposed with high speed optical gates in back-to-back case and 50km SMF transmission [16

16. D. Hillerkuss, T. Schellinger, R. Schmogrow, M. Winter, T. Vallaitis, R. Bonk, A. Marculescu, J. Li, M. Dreschmann, J. Meyer, S. Ben Ezra, N. Narkiss, B. Nebendahl, F. Parmigiani, P. Petropoulos, B. Resan, K. Weingarten, T. Ellermeyer, J. Lutz, M. Möller, M. Hübner, J. Becker, C. Koos, W. Freude, and J. Leuthold, “Single source optical OFDM transmitter and optical FFT receiver demonstration at line rate of 5.4 and 10.8Tb/s,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2010), paper PDPC1.

,17

17. D. Hillerkuss, R. Schmogrow, T. Schellinger, M. Jordan, M. Winter, G. Huber, T. Vallaitis, R. Bonk, P. Kleinow, F. Frey, M. Roeger, S. Koenig, A. Ludwig, A. Marculescu, J. Li, M. Hoh, M. Dreschmann, J. Meyer, S. Ben Ezra, N. Narkiss, B. Nebendahl, F. Parmigiani, P. Petropoulos, B. Resan, A. Oehler, K. Weingarten, T. Ellermeyer, J. Lutz, M. Moeller, M. Huebner, J. Becker, C. Koos, W. Freude, and J. Leuthold, “26 Tbits−1 line-rate super-channel transmission utilizing all-optical fast Fourier transform processing,” Nat. Photonics 5(6), 364–371 (2011). [CrossRef]

]. We have proposed an all-optical OFDM signal generation with optical cyclic postfixes (OCPs) and real-time detection with optical Fourier transform filters based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) in [18

18. H. Chen, M. Chen, and S. Xie, “All-optical sampling orthogonal frequency division multiplexing scheme for high speed transmission system,” J. Lightwave Technol. 27(21), 4848–4854 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. A simple receiver structure with neither coherent detection nor synchronous optical gates is applied in this system. Moreover, with optical cyclic postfixes inserted, good transmission performance is achieved.

In this paper, a novel all-optical sampling OFDM (AOS-OFDM) scheme employing differential quadrature phase-shift keying (DQPSK) format and polarization multiplexing (PolMux) is demonstrated. A single phase stable ultra-short pulse source is used as optical samples. By an optical OFDM multiplexer, 5 DWDM channels are realized [19

19. A. D. Ellis and F. C. G. Gunning, “Spectral density enhancement using coherent WDM,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 17(2), 504–506 (2005). [CrossRef]

]; while in each channel there are 5 all-optical subcarrier channels (SC). 5×200Gb/s PolMux-DQPSK-AOS-OFDM signals are generated and successfully transmitted over 80km single-mode fiber (SMF). The receiver end is highly simplified with real-time detection by using OFT filters.

2. Principles

Nowadays, many optical OFDM systems are based on high speed electronic processing modules such as DAC/ADC and DSPs. At the transmitter, electrical devices perform many dominating functions including serial to parallel conversion (S/P), modulation format, inverse DFT, parallel to serial conversion (P/S) and DAC. The optical devices only carry and detect OFDM signals and provide optical channels. At the receiver end, the process is just inversion of the transmitter which is also done by electronics as shown in Fig. 1(a)
Fig. 1 Structure of (a) Electrical-Optical OFDM system and (b) All-Optical OFDM system.
. So electrical bottleneck limits the speed and bandwidth of OFDM used in optical communication. In fact, optical technologies can do more complex signal processing functions by taking advantage of high bandwidth and high speed parallel process. Thus, we can shift many electrical functions to optical domain, such as digital sampling, sub-carrier mapping, cyclic postfix or prefix (CP) insertion, etc. Here, we use ultra-short pulses as optical sampling and do sub-carrier mapping by optical OFDM multiplexers as shown in Fig. 1(b). At the receiver, matched optical Fourier transform filters can be employed to extract corresponding sub-carrier channels to do parallel receptions.

Many techniques, including delay interferometers (DI) [17

17. D. Hillerkuss, R. Schmogrow, T. Schellinger, M. Jordan, M. Winter, G. Huber, T. Vallaitis, R. Bonk, P. Kleinow, F. Frey, M. Roeger, S. Koenig, A. Ludwig, A. Marculescu, J. Li, M. Hoh, M. Dreschmann, J. Meyer, S. Ben Ezra, N. Narkiss, B. Nebendahl, F. Parmigiani, P. Petropoulos, B. Resan, A. Oehler, K. Weingarten, T. Ellermeyer, J. Lutz, M. Moeller, M. Huebner, J. Becker, C. Koos, W. Freude, and J. Leuthold, “26 Tbits−1 line-rate super-channel transmission utilizing all-optical fast Fourier transform processing,” Nat. Photonics 5(6), 364–371 (2011). [CrossRef]

] or arrayed waveguide gratings (AWG) [19

19. A. D. Ellis and F. C. G. Gunning, “Spectral density enhancement using coherent WDM,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 17(2), 504–506 (2005). [CrossRef]

], are used to perform all-optical Fourier transform avoiding electrical bottle neck. However, at the receiver, a synchronous optical gate should be used to extract the correct sample [17

17. D. Hillerkuss, R. Schmogrow, T. Schellinger, M. Jordan, M. Winter, G. Huber, T. Vallaitis, R. Bonk, P. Kleinow, F. Frey, M. Roeger, S. Koenig, A. Ludwig, A. Marculescu, J. Li, M. Hoh, M. Dreschmann, J. Meyer, S. Ben Ezra, N. Narkiss, B. Nebendahl, F. Parmigiani, P. Petropoulos, B. Resan, A. Oehler, K. Weingarten, T. Ellermeyer, J. Lutz, M. Moeller, M. Huebner, J. Becker, C. Koos, W. Freude, and J. Leuthold, “26 Tbits−1 line-rate super-channel transmission utilizing all-optical fast Fourier transform processing,” Nat. Photonics 5(6), 364–371 (2011). [CrossRef]

], which will increase the receiver complexity in a high-speed system. In order to take full advantage of optical devices, we proposed a novel all-optical OFDM technique in ref [18

18. H. Chen, M. Chen, and S. Xie, “All-optical sampling orthogonal frequency division multiplexing scheme for high speed transmission system,” J. Lightwave Technol. 27(21), 4848–4854 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. The basic principle of all-optical OFDM is similar with that of electrical ones. With optical delay lines and phase shifters, one can use ultrashort optical pulses as samples to do DFT/IDFT process all optically. The structures of optical OFDM MUX-FBG and DMUX-FBG are illustrated in ref [18

18. H. Chen, M. Chen, and S. Xie, “All-optical sampling orthogonal frequency division multiplexing scheme for high speed transmission system,” J. Lightwave Technol. 27(21), 4848–4854 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. The main advantage to use FBG as AOS-OFDM MUX is to add optical CPs to OFDM signals as in electrical domain and can have more DFT points in a compact structure. As shown in Fig. 2(a)
Fig. 2 (a) Separate AOS-OFDM sub-carrier MUX FBGs (b) Compact multiple sub-carrier MUX FBG.
, each sub-grating (SG) is designed for a certain sub-carrier channel, in which there are many sample spots to reflect the incoming optical pulses with proper time delay and phase shifts. In [20

20. Z. X. Wang, K. S. Kravtsov, Y. K. Huang, and P. R. Prucnal, “Optical FFT/IFFT circuit realization using arrayed waveguide gratings and the application in all-optical OFDM system,” Opt. Express 19(5), 4501–4512 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], we have built an AOS-OFDM system with 5 separated sub-gratings for 100Gb/s transmission. In order to simplify the system, we fabricate a compact MUX-FBG as shown in Fig. 2(b). Many sub-gratings are cascaded with time delay T, which equals to half of the OFDM symbol period to keep all the channels synchronous and decorrelative. At the receiver, only one stretched DMUX-FBG, whose structure is same with [21

21. H. Chen, M. Chen, F. Yin, M. Xin, and S. Xie, “100Gb/s PolMux-NRZ-AOS-OFDM transmission system,” Opt. Express 17(21), 18768–18773 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], is used for matched optical Fourier transform filter to extract corresponding SC channel.

3. Experiment

The experimental setup is shown in Fig. 3
Fig. 3 Experimental Setup, MLFL: mode-locked fiber laser; CWL: continuous wave laser; HNPCF: highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber; OBPF: optical band-pass filter; PPG: pulse pattern generator; MUX: multiplexer; ODL: optical delay line; PC: polarization controller; PBS: polarization beam splitter; PBC: polarization beam coupler; SMF: single mode fiber; DMUX: demultiplexer; AWG: array waveguide grating; BPD: balanced photo detector.
. A 10GHz ultra-short optical pulse train whose pulse width is 2ps from a mode-locked fiber laser (MLFL) passes through a wavelength converter (WC) to overcome the poor pulse-to-pulse coherence. The WC is based on cross polarization modulation (CPM) effect. Figure 3(A) shows the spectrum of the pump light from the MLFL with central frequency of 193.5THz. By using polarization controllers (PCs), the polarization direction of the pump pulse is maintained along the slow axis of highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (HNPCF) and that of the probe light is 45° to the slow axis. The pump light and the 192.6THz probe light couple into the HNPCF to complete CPM effect after being amplified by an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) with 25dBm output power. The HNPCF has a high nonlinear coefficient of 12W−1/km. The spectrum after the CPM effect in HNPCF is shown in Fig. 3(B), including the probe and pump light. The output of HNPCF passes through an optical band-pass filter (OBPF) by adjusting its central frequency to avoid disturbance from the pump pulse. The filtered signal is adjusted by a PC and split by a polarization beam splitter (PBS) to extract an optical pulse train whose spectrum is shown in Fig. 3(C). For the CPM effect is dominated by the peak power of the pump pulses, the optical pulse after WC is independent of the pump pulse phase noise and has good coherent characteristics for DQPSK modulation.

The DQPSK modulator is driven by two synchronous pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS) from a pulse pattern generator (PPG) at 10Gb/s making the total bit rate 20Gb/s. Then the signal is reflected by the MUX-FBG for generating all-optical OFDM signals. In our fabrication, the grating is written using 30-mW of continuous-wave UV-light at 244-nm from a frequency-doubled Arion laser with hydrogen-loaded Corning SMF28 fiber. The FBG is written using the standard phase mask technology, and the phase shift is achieved by using a piezoelectric nanoautomation stage with 0.1-nm resolution. In this experiment, 5 sub-gratings for different SC channels are made compact in one FBG. The single-way time interval between each SG is set to 50ps which is indicated as T in Fig. 3. T equals to half of the OFDM symbol period (100ps) to keep all the 5 SC channels synchronous and decorrelative. The i-th MUX sub-grating is designed to have 10 reflection sample spots including 2 of them are cyclic postfixes (CPs), the time delay and phase shift of n-th sub-grating are (n-1) ×10ps /2 and (i-3) ×(n-1) π/4(i = 1,2…5) respectively. Detail structure parameters of AOS-OFDM MUX are shown in Table 1

Table 1. Parameters for AOS-OFDM MUX

table-icon
View This Table
.The MUX-FBG has periodic spectrum and the free spectrum range (FSR) is equal to 100GHz shown in Fig. 3(D), so the multiplexed signals can fit with WDM grids. An optical bandpass filter is used to get 5 channels for transmission with each channel containing 5 OFDM SCs. The spectral of these five channels at D are shown in Fig. 4(a)
Fig. 4 Spectra of (a) AOS-OFDM signal and (b) demultiplexed signals.
. Then the signals are tuned by a polarization controller (PC) and fed into a couple of polarization beam splitter (PBS) and polarization beam coupler (PBC) to perform PolMux. An optical delay line (ODL) is used to get different signals asynchronous in two polarizations. The total line rate now is 2(pol.) ×5(WDM channels) ×5(OFDM SCs) ×20Gb/s = 1Tb/s.

4. Results

The spectrum of the PolMux-DQPSK-AOS-OFDM signal is shown in Fig. 4(a). The bandwidth between first null points of each channel (200Gb/s) is about 65GHz corresponding to the spectral efficiency 3.07bit/s/Hz, which is an advantage for multi-OADM-hop transmission in optical networks. The spectrum of ch3 is zoomed in and the spectra of demultiplexed SC11-SC15 channels for channel 3 in POL-X axis are also shown in Fig. 4(b). Bit error rate (BER) performance of received data for 50 subcarrier channels of two polarizations is shown in Fig. 5
Fig. 5 BER performances of received data for 50 subcarrier channels of two polarizations, demodulated constellation diagram of SC12 channels for (a) B2B and (b) 80km case.
. The BER variation mainly comes from the non-ideal structures of FBGs. After 80km transmission link, the BERs of each SC are still lower than the advanced forward error correction (FEC) limit (2×10−3). The insert (a) and (b) in Fig. 5 are the demodulated constellations of demultiplexed SC12 channels for both B2B and 80km case.

5. Conclusion

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the NSFC under Contract 60932004, 61132004, 61090391.

References and links

1.

H. Bao and W. Shieh, “Transmission simulation of coherent optical OFDM signals in WDM systems,” Opt. Express 15(8), 4410–4418 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

2.

J. Armstrong, “OFDM for optical communications,” J. Lightwave Technol. 27(3), 189–204 (2009). [CrossRef]

3.

A. J. Lowery and J. Armstrong, “Orthogonal-frequency-division multiplexing for dispersion compensation of long-haul optical systems,” Opt. Express 14(6), 2079–2084 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

N. Cvijetic, L. Xu, and T. Wang, “Adaptive PMD compensation using OFDM in long-haul 10Gb/s DWDM systems,” in Proc. 2007 IEEE/OSA Opt. Fiber Commun. Conf. (OFC/NFOEC), paper OTuA5.

5.

W. Shieh, Q. Yang, and Y. Ma, “107 Gb/s coherent optical OFDM transmission over 1000-km SSMF fiber using orthogonal band multiplexing,” Opt. Express 16(9), 6378–6386 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

S. L. Jansen, I. Morita, T. C. W. Schenk, and H. Tanaka, “121.9-Gb/s PDM-OFDM transmission with 2-b/s/Hz spectral efficiency over 1000 km of SSMF,” J. Lightwave Technol. 27(3), 177–188 (2009). [CrossRef]

7.

Y. Ma, Q. Yang, Y. Tang, S. Chen, and W. Shieh, “1-Tb/s single-channel coherent optical OFDM transmission over 600-km SSMF fiber with subwavelength bandwidth access,” Opt. Express 17(11), 9421–9427 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

E. Yamada, A. Sano, H. Masuda, E. Yamazaki, T. Kobayashi, E. Yoshida, K. Yonenaga, Y. Miyamoto, K. Ishihara, Y. Takatori, T. Yamada, and H. Yamazaki, “1Tb/s (111Gb/s/ch x 10ch) No-Guard-Interval CO-OFDM Transmission over 2100 km DSF,” in Proc. 2008 Optoelectronics and Commun. Conf. (OECC), (Optical Society of America, 2008), paper PDP.6.

9.

K. Takiguchi, M. Oguma, H. Takahashi, and A. Mori, “PLC-based eight-channel OFDM demultiplexer and its demonstration with 160 Gbit/s signal reception,” in Conference on Optical Fiber Communication, OFC, (San Diego, CA, 2010), paper OThB4.

10.

T. Pfau, R. Peveling, V. Herath, S. Hoffmann, C. Wordehoff, O. Adamczyk, M. Porrmann, and R. Noe, “Towards real-time implementation of coherent optical communication,” in Proc. 2009 IEEE/OSA Opt. Fiber Commun. Conf. (OFC/NFOEC), (Optical Society of America, 2009), paper OThJ4.

11.

Q. Yang, N. Kaneda, X. Liu, S. Chandrasekhar, W. Shieh, and Y. Chen, “Real-Time Coherent Optical OFDM Receiver at 2.5-GS/s for Receiving a 54-Gb/s Multi-Band Signal,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2009), paper PDPC5.

12.

R. P. Giddings, E. Hugues-Salas, X. Q. Jin, J. L. Wei, and J. M. Tang, “Experimental demonstration of real-time optical OFDM transmission at 7.5 Gb/s Over 25-km SSMF using a 1-GHz RSOA,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 22(11), 745–747 (2010). [CrossRef]

13.

P. Frascella, N. Mac Suibhne, F. C. Gunning, S. K. Ibrahim, P. Gunning, and A. D. Ellis, “Unrepeatered field transmission of 2 Tbit/s multi-banded coherent WDM over 124 km of installed SMF,” Opt. Express 18(24), 24745–24752 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

A. J. Lowery, “Design of arrayed-waveguide grating routers for use as optical OFDM demultiplexers,” Opt. Express 18(13), 14129–14143 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

15.

D. Hillerkuss, M. Winter, M. Teschke, A. Marculescu, J. Li, G. Sigurdsson, K. Worms, S. Ben Ezra, N. Narkiss, W. Freude, and J. Leuthold, “Simple all-optical FFT scheme enabling Tbit/s real-time signal processing,” Opt. Express 18(9), 9324–9340 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

D. Hillerkuss, T. Schellinger, R. Schmogrow, M. Winter, T. Vallaitis, R. Bonk, A. Marculescu, J. Li, M. Dreschmann, J. Meyer, S. Ben Ezra, N. Narkiss, B. Nebendahl, F. Parmigiani, P. Petropoulos, B. Resan, K. Weingarten, T. Ellermeyer, J. Lutz, M. Möller, M. Hübner, J. Becker, C. Koos, W. Freude, and J. Leuthold, “Single source optical OFDM transmitter and optical FFT receiver demonstration at line rate of 5.4 and 10.8Tb/s,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2010), paper PDPC1.

17.

D. Hillerkuss, R. Schmogrow, T. Schellinger, M. Jordan, M. Winter, G. Huber, T. Vallaitis, R. Bonk, P. Kleinow, F. Frey, M. Roeger, S. Koenig, A. Ludwig, A. Marculescu, J. Li, M. Hoh, M. Dreschmann, J. Meyer, S. Ben Ezra, N. Narkiss, B. Nebendahl, F. Parmigiani, P. Petropoulos, B. Resan, A. Oehler, K. Weingarten, T. Ellermeyer, J. Lutz, M. Moeller, M. Huebner, J. Becker, C. Koos, W. Freude, and J. Leuthold, “26 Tbits−1 line-rate super-channel transmission utilizing all-optical fast Fourier transform processing,” Nat. Photonics 5(6), 364–371 (2011). [CrossRef]

18.

H. Chen, M. Chen, and S. Xie, “All-optical sampling orthogonal frequency division multiplexing scheme for high speed transmission system,” J. Lightwave Technol. 27(21), 4848–4854 (2009). [CrossRef]

19.

A. D. Ellis and F. C. G. Gunning, “Spectral density enhancement using coherent WDM,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 17(2), 504–506 (2005). [CrossRef]

20.

Z. X. Wang, K. S. Kravtsov, Y. K. Huang, and P. R. Prucnal, “Optical FFT/IFFT circuit realization using arrayed waveguide gratings and the application in all-optical OFDM system,” Opt. Express 19(5), 4501–4512 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

21.

H. Chen, M. Chen, F. Yin, M. Xin, and S. Xie, “100Gb/s PolMux-NRZ-AOS-OFDM transmission system,” Opt. Express 17(21), 18768–18773 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

22.

C. Tang, H. Chen, F. Yin, M. Chen, and S. Xie, “200Gs/s Real-Time Optical-Sampling-Based Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing System,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2010), paper OWO5.

OCIS Codes
(060.4230) Fiber optics and optical communications : Multiplexing
(060.4510) Fiber optics and optical communications : Optical communications
(060.3735) Fiber optics and optical communications : Fiber Bragg gratings

ToC Category:
Fiber Optics and Optical Communications

History
Original Manuscript: July 25, 2011
Revised Manuscript: September 30, 2011
Manuscript Accepted: September 30, 2011
Published: October 10, 2011

Citation
Hongwei Chen, Xingyao Gu, Feifei Yin, Minghua Chen, and Shizhong Xie, "5×200Gbit/s all-optical OFDM transmission using a single optical source and optical Fourier transform real-time detection," Opt. Express 19, 21199-21204 (2011)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-19-22-21199


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References

  1. H. Bao and W. Shieh, “Transmission simulation of coherent optical OFDM signals in WDM systems,” Opt. Express15(8), 4410–4418 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. J. Armstrong, “OFDM for optical communications,” J. Lightwave Technol.27(3), 189–204 (2009). [CrossRef]
  3. A. J. Lowery and J. Armstrong, “Orthogonal-frequency-division multiplexing for dispersion compensation of long-haul optical systems,” Opt. Express14(6), 2079–2084 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. N. Cvijetic, L. Xu, and T. Wang, “Adaptive PMD compensation using OFDM in long-haul 10Gb/s DWDM systems,” in Proc. 2007 IEEE/OSA Opt. Fiber Commun. Conf. (OFC/NFOEC), paper OTuA5.
  5. W. Shieh, Q. Yang, and Y. Ma, “107 Gb/s coherent optical OFDM transmission over 1000-km SSMF fiber using orthogonal band multiplexing,” Opt. Express16(9), 6378–6386 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. S. L. Jansen, I. Morita, T. C. W. Schenk, and H. Tanaka, “121.9-Gb/s PDM-OFDM transmission with 2-b/s/Hz spectral efficiency over 1000 km of SSMF,” J. Lightwave Technol.27(3), 177–188 (2009). [CrossRef]
  7. Y. Ma, Q. Yang, Y. Tang, S. Chen, and W. Shieh, “1-Tb/s single-channel coherent optical OFDM transmission over 600-km SSMF fiber with subwavelength bandwidth access,” Opt. Express17(11), 9421–9427 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
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