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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 19, Iss. 6 — Mar. 14, 2011
  • pp: 4848–4855
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Band-pass plasmonic slot filter with band selection and spectrally splitting capabilities

Feifei Hu, Huaxiang Yi, and Zhiping Zhou  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 19, Issue 6, pp. 4848-4855 (2011)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.19.004848


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Abstract

An ultra-compact surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) narrow band-pass filter based on a slot cavity is proposed and numerically investigated. Attributed to the coupled resonances in the cavity, the filter demonstrates pass-band selection capability. Also, by varying the positions of output waveguides, the filter shows the spectrally splitting function. Moreover, the combination of the adjustments to the length/width of the slot cavity and to the coupling distance provides more flexibility in design for the locations and widths of the pass-bands of the proposed filter.

© 2011 OSA

1. Introduction

Surface Plasmons, which are propagating along a metal-dielectric interface with an exponentially decaying field in both sides, have been considered as energy and information carriers to overcome the diffraction limit of light in conventional optics [1

1. H. Raether, Surface Plasmon on Smooth and Rough Surfaces and Gratings (Springer-Verlag, 1998).

3

3. S. A. Maier, P. G. Kik, H. A. Atwater, S. Meltzer, E. Harel, B. E. Koel, and A. A. G. Requicha, “Local detection of electromagnetic energy transport below the diffraction limit in metal nanoparticle plasmon waveguides,” Nat. Mater. 2(4), 229–232 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Among various SPPs based waveguides, metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure [4

4. K. Tanaka, M. Tanaka, and T. Sugiyama, “Simulation of practical nanometric optical circuits based on surface plasmon polariton gap waveguides,” Opt. Express 13(1), 256–266 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,5

5. L. Liu, Z. Han, and S. He, “Novel surface plasmon waveguide for high integration,” Opt. Express 13(17), 6645–6650 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] has attracted tremendous interests of researchers in recent years, because of its potential applications to manipulate and control light in nanoscale. Numerous MIM waveguide based structures have been numerically and/or experimentally demonstrated, such as bends [6

6. T. W. Lee and S. Gray, “Subwavelength light bending by metal slit structures,” Opt. Express 13(24), 9652–9659 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], splitters [7

7. G. Veronis and S. Fan, “Bends and splitters in metal-dielectric-metal subwavelength plasmonic waveguides,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 87(13), 131102 (2005). [CrossRef]

], Mach-Zehnder interferometers [8

8. B. Wang and G. P. Wang, “Surface plasmon polariton propagation in nanoscale metal gap waveguides,” Opt. Lett. 29(17), 1992–1994 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], Y-shaped combiners [9

9. H. Gao, H. Shi, C. Wang, C. Du, X. Luo, Q. Deng, Y. Lv, X. Lin, and H. Yao, “Surface plasmon polariton propagation and combination in Y-shaped metallic channels,” Opt. Express 13(26), 10795–10800 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], etc. In order to realize wavelength selection, several Bragg reflectors of MIM structure [10

10. B. Wang and G. P. Wang, “Plasmon Bragg reflectors and nanocavities on flat metallic surfaces,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 87(1), 013107 (2005). [CrossRef]

12

12. J. Q. Liu, L. L. Wang, M. D. He, W. Q. Huang, D. Wang, B. S. Zou, and S. Wen, “A wide bandgap plasmonic Bragg reflector,” Opt. Express 16(7), 4888–4894 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] have been theoretically proposed. But most of these structures have large sizes with a relatively high transmission loss. Subsequently, some simple plasmonic waveguide filters have been proposed and demonstrated, such as tooth-shaped waveguide filters [13

13. X. S. Lin and X. G. Huang, “Tooth-shaped plasmonic waveguide filters with nanometeric sizes,” Opt. Lett. 33(23), 2874–2876 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,14

14. J. Tao, X. G. Huang, X. S. Lin, Q. Zhang, and X. Jin, “A narrow-band subwavelength plasmonic waveguide filter with asymmetrical multiple-teeth-shaped structure,” Opt. Express 17(16), 13989–13994 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], coupler-type filters [15

15. Q. Zhang, X. G. Huang, X. S. Lin, J. Tao, and X. P. Jin, “A subwavelength coupler-type MIM optical filter,” Opt. Express 17(9), 7549–7555 (2009). [CrossRef]

], channel drop filters with disk resonators [16

16. S. S. Xiao, L. Liu, and M. Qiu, “Resonator channel drop filters in a plasmon-polaritons metal,” Opt. Express 14(7), 2932–2937 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], rectangular geometry resonators [17

17. A. Hosseini and Y. Massoud, “Nanoscale surface plasmon based resonator using rectangular geometry,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 90(18), 181102 (2007). [CrossRef]

], and ring resonators [16

16. S. S. Xiao, L. Liu, and M. Qiu, “Resonator channel drop filters in a plasmon-polaritons metal,” Opt. Express 14(7), 2932–2937 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Most of them can overcome the complexity of fabrication of Bragg reflectors and operate as good band-stop filters. More recently, F-P cavity [18

18. A. Noual, A. Akjouj, Y. Pennec, J.-N. Gillet, and B. Djafari-Rouhani, “Modeling of two-dimensional nanoscale Y-bent plasmonic waveguides with cavities for demultiplexing of the telecommunication wavelengths,” N. J. Phys. 11(10), 103020 (2009). [CrossRef]

], microring [19

19. T. B. Wang, X. W. Wen, C. P. Yin, and H. Z. Wang, “The transmission characteristics of surface plasmon polaritons in ring resonator,” Opt. Express 17(26), 24096–24101 (2009). [CrossRef]

] and nanodisk [20

20. H. Lu, X. M. Liu, D. Mao, L. R. Wang, and Y. K. Gong, “Tunable band-pass plasmonic waveguide filters with nanodisk resonators,” Opt. Express 18(17), 17922–17927 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] resonators through a different coupling method have been proposed as band-pass filters. However, all above mentioned can only modify their resonance wavelengths by adjusting the internal parameters of the resonators.

2. Device structure and theoretical model

As shown in Fig. 1
Fig. 1 Schematic of the plasmonic slot filter.
, the plasmonic slot filter is composed of two MIM waveguides and a short slot cavity. The materials in the blue and white areas are chosen to be silver and air (εd = 1). The widths of input/output waveguides and slot cavity are w and wt, respectively. The length of slot cavity is L, and the distance of the input and output waveguides apart from the central line O of the slot cavity are ΔL and h, respectively. d is the coupling distance between two waveguides and slot cavity. Since the widths of the waveguides are much smaller than the incident wavelength, only a single propagation mode TM0 (only Hy,Ex, Ez,≠0) can exist in the structure [21

21. J. A. Dionne, L. A. Sweatlock, H. A. Atwater, and A. Polman, “Plasmon slot waveguides: towards chip-scale propagation with subwavelength-scale localization,” Phys. Rev. B 73(3), 035407 (2006). [CrossRef]

], whose complex propagation constant β can be obtained by solving following dispersion equation [10

10. B. Wang and G. P. Wang, “Plasmon Bragg reflectors and nanocavities on flat metallic surfaces,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 87(1), 013107 (2005). [CrossRef]

,21

21. J. A. Dionne, L. A. Sweatlock, H. A. Atwater, and A. Polman, “Plasmon slot waveguides: towards chip-scale propagation with subwavelength-scale localization,” Phys. Rev. B 73(3), 035407 (2006). [CrossRef]

]:
εdkm+εmkdtanh(kd2w)=0,
(1)
where kd and km are defined as kd=(β2εdk02)1/2 and km=(β2εmk02)1/2. εd and εm are, respectively, dielectric constants of the insulator and the metal. k0=2π/λ is the free-space wave vector. The effective refractive index of the MIM waveguide can be represented as neff=β/k0. The frequency-dependent complex relative permittivity of metal εm(ω) can be characterized by Drude mode εm(ω)=εωp/ω(ω+iγ), where ε stands for the dielectric constant at the infinite frequency, γ and ωp are the electron collision frequency and bulk plasma frequency, respectively. ω is the angular frequency of incident light. The parameters for sliver can be set as ε = 3.7, ωp = 9.1 eV, γ = 0.018 eV, which fit the experimental optical constant of silver [22

22. P. B. Johnson and R. W. Christy, “Optical constants of the noble metals,” Phys. Rev. B 6(12), 4370–4379 (1972). [CrossRef]

] quiet well in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. The stable standing waves can be exited within the slot cavity only when the following resonance condition is satisfied: Δϕ=βm·2L+ϕr=2mπ, where ϕr ≡ ϕ1 + ϕ2, ϕ1 and ϕ2 are, respectively, phase shifts of a beam reflected on the upper and lower facets of the slot cavity. Positive integer mis the number of antinodes of the standing waves in this slot cavity. βm is the propagation constant of SPPs corresponding to the resonance mode of the mstorder of the cavity. Thus, the resonance wavelengths can be obtained as follows:
λm=2neffL/(mϕr/π).
(2)
Given the arbitrary input position ΔL in the structure, the input filed Hin inside the slot cavity is divided into two nearly identical portions Hleft and Hright propagating in opposite directions as depicted in Fig. 1. The relation between them is Hleft = Hright = Hin/2 = H0. We assume the loss coefficient of the slot cavity is σ, which represents the dissipation of the light propagating per round-trip in the cavity, including the absorbing loss by the metal and the loss caused by the power coupled out of the cavity. Since the slot cavity is symmetric with respect to the central line x = 0, we just need to consider the condition that the position of the input waveguide changes above the central line (x>0). Based on the superposition principle of optics [23

23. S. A. Akhmanov, and S. Y. Nikitin, Physical Optics (Oxford University Press, 1997).

] and cavity model, we can describe Hfield inside the cavity with an arbitrary input position ΔL as follows:
Hm(x,t)=2H0cos(βmxβmL2)σ×{exp[j(32βmLβmΔL)]             +exp[j(βmΔL+12βmL)]}·exp(jωmt),
(3)
where 0ΔLL/2, βm·2L2mπ accords to the above resonance condition with a very small parameter ϕr . From the Eq. (3), we can see the H fields inside the cavity are in the form of the standing waves along x direction at the resonance wavelengths. In this paper, we only consider the first and second resonance mode of the slot cavity. Therefore, for the resonance of the first order (m = 1), we can obtain the H field inside the cavity as follows:
H1(x,t)=2H0cos(β1xπ2)σ·[2sin(β1ΔL)]·exp(jω1t).
(4)
For the resonance of the second order (m = 2), the Eq. (3) can be written as follows:
H2(x,t)=2H0cos(β2xπ)σ·[2cos(β2ΔL)]·exp(jω2t).
(5)
Based on the formulas above, It can be found: when ΔL=0, the H field inside the cavity is H1(x,t)0, which means that the first resonance mode can’t exist inside the slot cavity, only the second resonance mode can be coupled into the cavity. Whereas, when ΔL=L/4, one can obtain the field H2(x,t)0, that means the second resonance mode have been highly suppressed in this case. This phenomenon of selectively suppressing the intrinsic resonance mode of the slot cavity will be verified numerically and explained visually latter on.

3. Simulation results and analysis

In the following FDTD (commercial package) simulations, the grid size in the x and z directions are set to be 4 nm × 4 nm for good convergence of the numerical calculations. The fundamental TM mode of the MIM waveguide is excited by a pulse dipole source from the left waveguide. Two power monitors P and Q are set to detect the reflected and transmitted powers of Pref and Ptr at the locations, the transmittance and reflectance are defined as T=Ptr/Pin and R=Pref/Pin, respectively. The absorption parameter is simply given by A=1RT, which represents the dissipation of the power in the device. The parameters of the structure are set to be w = wt = 50 nm, d = 15 nm, and L = 500 nm. Firstly, the positions of input/output waveguides are fixed as ΔL = h = 225 nm, which means they are kept on the top end of the slot cavity. Figure 2(a)
Fig. 2 (a)The spectra of the transmission and the reflection of the plasmonic slot filter. The contour profiles of fields |Hy| in the structure at different wavelengths (b) λ = 0.74 μm, (c) λ = 1.0 μm, and (d) λ = 1.47 μm.
shows the spectra of the transmission, reflection and the absorption of the proposed filter. It can be seen that two resonance peaks at the wavelengths λ = 0.74 μm and 1.47 μm are located in the wavelength range 0.6-1.7 μm of interest, and the corresponding maximum transmittances are 70% (−1.5 dB) and 46% (−3.37 dB), respectively. The quality factor (defined as Q=λΔλ, where λ is the resonance wavelength of the cavity and Δλ is the full width at half maximum of transmission spectra [10

10. B. Wang and G. P. Wang, “Plasmon Bragg reflectors and nanocavities on flat metallic surfaces,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 87(1), 013107 (2005). [CrossRef]

]) at 0.74 μm and 1.47μm are, respectively, 35 and 37 in this case (d = 15 nm). It is also shown that two peaks appear around the resonance wavelengths in the absorption curve, because the SPPs coupled into the slot cavity would propagate backwards and forwards inside the cavity and thus undergo great absorption caused by the metal. The counter profiles of fields |Hy| at the different wavelengths are depicted in Fig. 2(b)2(d). According to the Eq. (1), the effective index neff of the MIM waveguide at 0.74 μm and 1.47 μm are calculated to be 1.41 and 1.376, respectively. Given the total phase shift ϕr, one can estimate the resonance wavelengths from Eq. (2). Submitting λ1 = 1.47 μm and neff = 1.376 into Eq. (2) gives ϕr = 0.22 for m = 1 and L = 500 nm. Therefore, the wavelength for m = 2 can be approximately calculated as 0.73 μm for neff = 1.41 and ϕr = 0.22 with the formula, which agrees reasonable well with the simulation result for λ2 = 0.74 μm. The deviation between FDTD simulation and the result from Eq. (2) could be attributed to the neglecting of wavelength dependence of ϕr.

Based on the assumptions and analysis in above section, a few novel characteristics of the proposed filter will be demonstrated as follows.

Secondly, the parameter h, which stands for the distance of output waveguide apart from the central line O of the slot cavity, is also an important factor influencing the output characteristics of the proposed filter, because the out-coupling strength through the end-coupling method is strongly depending on the intensity of Hfield in the out-coupling regions. In another word, the SPPs can hardly be coupled out from the cavity in the position with very low intensity of Hfield. In order to verify the above theoretical analysis, let the input waveguide on the top end of the slot cavity with other parameters unchanged to make sure that two resonance modes exist inside the slot cavity. According to Eq. (3), one can easily find out that the Hfield inside the slot cavity is in the form of standing waves and that the antinodes of the standing waves for the first and second resonance are in the positions h = 0 and h = 125 nm, respectively, which is also seen in Fig. 2(b) and 2(d). Therefore, when two output waveguides are put in the above positions of the antinodes as shown in Fig. 4(a)
Fig. 4 (a) Schematic of the plasmonic slot filter with two output waveguides at h = 0 and h = 125 nm, respectively. (b) The transmission spectra of two output waveguides at h = 0 and h = 125 nm, respectively.
, the two resonance modes are separately coupled into two output waveguides as depicted in Fig. 4(b). It can be seen that only the first (second) resonance mode could be coupled out from the slot cavity in the position of the antinodes of the second (first) resonance. And the crosstalks between the port 1 (0.74 μm) and port 2 (1.47 μm) are −16 dB for the port 1 and −25 dB for the port 2, respectively. This characteristic can be utilized to realize a narrow band-pass filter with spectrally splitting function.

Next, the influence of internal parameters of the slot cavity on the resonance wavelengths is studied by FDTD method in detail. The input/output waveguides are fixed to the position ΔL = L/2w/2 to make sure that both two resonance modes exist inside the slot cavity. At the beginning, the length of the slot cavity is set as variable while the other parameters are fixed as above. Figure 5(a)
Fig. 5 (a) Transmission spectra of the structure for different length L with other parameters unchanged. Inset: Wavelengths of the resonance peaks versus the length of the slot cavity for different resonance order m = 1 and m = 2. (b) The transmission spectra for different widths of the slot cavity with L = 500 nm, d = 15 nm, ΔL = h = 225 nm.
shows the transmission spectra of the structure corresponding to different cavity lengths. The inset of Fig. 5(a) reveals the wavelengths of each resonance modes have nearly linear relationships with the length of the slot cavity, but with different slope factors (approximate to 1/m). This result is in accordance with the solution of Eq. (2). Meanwhile, according to Eq. (2), the resonance wavelengths will also shift when altering the width wt of the slot cavity, as shown in Fig. 5(b), resulting from the width-dependent effective index of MIM waveguide. Based on the simulations and analysis above, it is seen that the locations of the pass-bands of the filter can be easily designed by changing both the length and width of the slot cavity.

Now, we study the influence of the coupling distance d on the transmission characteristics of the proposed filter, which is also an important factor influencing the intensities of transmission spectra near the resonance wavelengths. Figure 6
Fig. 6 Transmission spectra of the proposed filter for different coupling distance d between the input/output waveguides and the slot cavity with L = 500 nm, ΔL = h = 225 nm.
shows the transmission curves would change with altering the coupling distance. It is obvious that the resonance wavelengths exhibits slightly blue-shift and transmission peaks decrease simultaneously with increasing the coupling distance, which is consistent with the results in Refs. [15

15. Q. Zhang, X. G. Huang, X. S. Lin, J. Tao, and X. P. Jin, “A subwavelength coupler-type MIM optical filter,” Opt. Express 17(9), 7549–7555 (2009). [CrossRef]

,19

19. T. B. Wang, X. W. Wen, C. P. Yin, and H. Z. Wang, “The transmission characteristics of surface plasmon polaritons in ring resonator,” Opt. Express 17(26), 24096–24101 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. Moreover, the bandwidths of peaks become a bit of narrower with increased d because a large coupling distance would result in small coupling strength which will enhance the “cavity” effect due to small amount of energy coupled out of the slot cavity. Therefore, the bandwidths (Q factor) of the resonance spectra can be modified by controlling the coupling distance d.

Finally, we make a simple comparison of our proposed structure with those considered in Refs. [15

15. Q. Zhang, X. G. Huang, X. S. Lin, J. Tao, and X. P. Jin, “A subwavelength coupler-type MIM optical filter,” Opt. Express 17(9), 7549–7555 (2009). [CrossRef]

20

20. H. Lu, X. M. Liu, D. Mao, L. R. Wang, and Y. K. Gong, “Tunable band-pass plasmonic waveguide filters with nanodisk resonators,” Opt. Express 18(17), 17922–17927 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Since the wavelengths of SPPs correspond to the resonance peaks are allowed to transport efficiently in the output waveguides, while others are forbidden. Our structure can operate as plasmonic band-pass filters, which is very different from the band-stop filters in Refs. [15

15. Q. Zhang, X. G. Huang, X. S. Lin, J. Tao, and X. P. Jin, “A subwavelength coupler-type MIM optical filter,” Opt. Express 17(9), 7549–7555 (2009). [CrossRef]

17

17. A. Hosseini and Y. Massoud, “Nanoscale surface plasmon based resonator using rectangular geometry,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 90(18), 181102 (2007). [CrossRef]

] based on the parallel directional coupling method. Compared with all other band-pass filters in the literature [18

18. A. Noual, A. Akjouj, Y. Pennec, J.-N. Gillet, and B. Djafari-Rouhani, “Modeling of two-dimensional nanoscale Y-bent plasmonic waveguides with cavities for demultiplexing of the telecommunication wavelengths,” N. J. Phys. 11(10), 103020 (2009). [CrossRef]

20

20. H. Lu, X. M. Liu, D. Mao, L. R. Wang, and Y. K. Gong, “Tunable band-pass plasmonic waveguide filters with nanodisk resonators,” Opt. Express 18(17), 17922–17927 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], the proposed slot filter has a very simple structure and flexible input/output positions (the input/output waveguides can be designed in the same side or different side of the slot cavity). Most importantly, the novel phenomena of suppressing resonance mode and spectrally splitting light have been both theoretically demonstrated and numerically verified for the first time in this paper. Besides, a single channel transmission can be realized in a broad wavelength range, while it’s unachievable in Refs. [18

18. A. Noual, A. Akjouj, Y. Pennec, J.-N. Gillet, and B. Djafari-Rouhani, “Modeling of two-dimensional nanoscale Y-bent plasmonic waveguides with cavities for demultiplexing of the telecommunication wavelengths,” N. J. Phys. 11(10), 103020 (2009). [CrossRef]

20

20. H. Lu, X. M. Liu, D. Mao, L. R. Wang, and Y. K. Gong, “Tunable band-pass plasmonic waveguide filters with nanodisk resonators,” Opt. Express 18(17), 17922–17927 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

4. Conclusion

In conclusion, a subwavelength plasmonic slot filter is proposed and numerically analyzed by using 2D FDTD method. Several adjustable parameters have been investigated to flexibly modify the filtering characteristics of the proposed plasmonic filter. Both the theoretical analysis and simulation results show the variation of the input/output waveguide positions is an effective method to select pass-band and spectrally split light. Moreover, the transmission spectra, including the resonance wavelength and bandwidth can also be adjusted by modulating the internal parameters of the cavity and the coupling distance between the slot cavity and input/output waveguides. The results above imply that it have potential applications in nanoscale integrated photonic circuits on flat metallic surface.

References and links

1.

H. Raether, Surface Plasmon on Smooth and Rough Surfaces and Gratings (Springer-Verlag, 1998).

2.

W. L. Barnes, A. Dereux, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Surface plasmon subwavelength optics,” Nature 424(6950), 824–830 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

S. A. Maier, P. G. Kik, H. A. Atwater, S. Meltzer, E. Harel, B. E. Koel, and A. A. G. Requicha, “Local detection of electromagnetic energy transport below the diffraction limit in metal nanoparticle plasmon waveguides,” Nat. Mater. 2(4), 229–232 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

K. Tanaka, M. Tanaka, and T. Sugiyama, “Simulation of practical nanometric optical circuits based on surface plasmon polariton gap waveguides,” Opt. Express 13(1), 256–266 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

L. Liu, Z. Han, and S. He, “Novel surface plasmon waveguide for high integration,” Opt. Express 13(17), 6645–6650 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

T. W. Lee and S. Gray, “Subwavelength light bending by metal slit structures,” Opt. Express 13(24), 9652–9659 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

G. Veronis and S. Fan, “Bends and splitters in metal-dielectric-metal subwavelength plasmonic waveguides,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 87(13), 131102 (2005). [CrossRef]

8.

B. Wang and G. P. Wang, “Surface plasmon polariton propagation in nanoscale metal gap waveguides,” Opt. Lett. 29(17), 1992–1994 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9.

H. Gao, H. Shi, C. Wang, C. Du, X. Luo, Q. Deng, Y. Lv, X. Lin, and H. Yao, “Surface plasmon polariton propagation and combination in Y-shaped metallic channels,” Opt. Express 13(26), 10795–10800 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

10.

B. Wang and G. P. Wang, “Plasmon Bragg reflectors and nanocavities on flat metallic surfaces,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 87(1), 013107 (2005). [CrossRef]

11.

Z. Han, E. Forsberg, and S. He, “Surface plasmon Bragg gratings formed in metal-insulator-metal waveguides,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 19(2), 91–93 (2007). [CrossRef]

12.

J. Q. Liu, L. L. Wang, M. D. He, W. Q. Huang, D. Wang, B. S. Zou, and S. Wen, “A wide bandgap plasmonic Bragg reflector,” Opt. Express 16(7), 4888–4894 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

X. S. Lin and X. G. Huang, “Tooth-shaped plasmonic waveguide filters with nanometeric sizes,” Opt. Lett. 33(23), 2874–2876 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

J. Tao, X. G. Huang, X. S. Lin, Q. Zhang, and X. Jin, “A narrow-band subwavelength plasmonic waveguide filter with asymmetrical multiple-teeth-shaped structure,” Opt. Express 17(16), 13989–13994 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

15.

Q. Zhang, X. G. Huang, X. S. Lin, J. Tao, and X. P. Jin, “A subwavelength coupler-type MIM optical filter,” Opt. Express 17(9), 7549–7555 (2009). [CrossRef]

16.

S. S. Xiao, L. Liu, and M. Qiu, “Resonator channel drop filters in a plasmon-polaritons metal,” Opt. Express 14(7), 2932–2937 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

17.

A. Hosseini and Y. Massoud, “Nanoscale surface plasmon based resonator using rectangular geometry,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 90(18), 181102 (2007). [CrossRef]

18.

A. Noual, A. Akjouj, Y. Pennec, J.-N. Gillet, and B. Djafari-Rouhani, “Modeling of two-dimensional nanoscale Y-bent plasmonic waveguides with cavities for demultiplexing of the telecommunication wavelengths,” N. J. Phys. 11(10), 103020 (2009). [CrossRef]

19.

T. B. Wang, X. W. Wen, C. P. Yin, and H. Z. Wang, “The transmission characteristics of surface plasmon polaritons in ring resonator,” Opt. Express 17(26), 24096–24101 (2009). [CrossRef]

20.

H. Lu, X. M. Liu, D. Mao, L. R. Wang, and Y. K. Gong, “Tunable band-pass plasmonic waveguide filters with nanodisk resonators,” Opt. Express 18(17), 17922–17927 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

21.

J. A. Dionne, L. A. Sweatlock, H. A. Atwater, and A. Polman, “Plasmon slot waveguides: towards chip-scale propagation with subwavelength-scale localization,” Phys. Rev. B 73(3), 035407 (2006). [CrossRef]

22.

P. B. Johnson and R. W. Christy, “Optical constants of the noble metals,” Phys. Rev. B 6(12), 4370–4379 (1972). [CrossRef]

23.

S. A. Akhmanov, and S. Y. Nikitin, Physical Optics (Oxford University Press, 1997).

OCIS Codes
(130.3120) Integrated optics : Integrated optics devices
(240.6680) Optics at surfaces : Surface plasmons
(130.7408) Integrated optics : Wavelength filtering devices

ToC Category:
Integrated Optics

History
Original Manuscript: December 13, 2010
Revised Manuscript: February 12, 2011
Manuscript Accepted: February 19, 2011
Published: February 28, 2011

Citation
Feifei Hu, Huaxiang Yi, and Zhiping Zhou, "Band-pass plasmonic slot filter with band selection and spectrally splitting capabilities," Opt. Express 19, 4848-4855 (2011)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-19-6-4848


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References

  1. H. Raether, Surface Plasmon on Smooth and Rough Surfaces and Gratings (Springer-Verlag, 1998).
  2. W. L. Barnes, A. Dereux, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Surface plasmon subwavelength optics,” Nature 424(6950), 824–830 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. S. A. Maier, P. G. Kik, H. A. Atwater, S. Meltzer, E. Harel, B. E. Koel, and A. A. G. Requicha, “Local detection of electromagnetic energy transport below the diffraction limit in metal nanoparticle plasmon waveguides,” Nat. Mater. 2(4), 229–232 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. K. Tanaka, M. Tanaka, and T. Sugiyama, “Simulation of practical nanometric optical circuits based on surface plasmon polariton gap waveguides,” Opt. Express 13(1), 256–266 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. L. Liu, Z. Han, and S. He, “Novel surface plasmon waveguide for high integration,” Opt. Express 13(17), 6645–6650 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
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