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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijin de Sterke
  • Vol. 19, Iss. 7 — Mar. 28, 2011
  • pp: 6945–6956
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Guidance in Kagome-like photonic crystal fibres I: analysis of an ideal fibre structure

Lei Chen, Greg J. Pearce, Timothy A. Birks, and David M. Bird  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 19, Issue 7, pp. 6945-6956 (2011)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.19.006945


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Abstract

Propagation of light in a square-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre is analysed as a model of guidance in a class of photonic crystal fibres that exhibit broad-band guidance without photonic bandgaps. A scalar governing equation is used and analytic solutions based on transfer matrices are developed for the full set of modes. It is found that an exponentially localised fundamental mode exists for a wide range of frequencies. These analytic solutions of an idealised structure will form the basis for analysis of guidance in a realistic structure in a following paper.

© 2011 OSA

1. Introduction

Hollow-core photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) consist of a low-index air hole surrounded by a periodic cladding structure [1

1. R. F. Cregan, B. J. Mangan, J. C. Knight, T. A. Birks, P. S. J. Russell, P. J. Roberts, and D. C. Allan, “Single-Mode Photonic Band Gap Guidance of Light in Air,” Science 285, 1537–1539 (1999). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. This periodic dielectric constant generates photonic bandgaps to prevent light spreading outside the central defect. The air-guided light has many applications owing to its low attenuation [2

2. P. Roberts, F. Couny, H. Sabert, B. Mangan, D. Williams, L. Farr, M. Mason, A. Tomlinson, T. Birks, J. Knight, and P. S. J. Russell, “Ultimate low loss of hollow-core photonic crystal fibres,” Opt. Express 13, 236–244 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] and nonlinear effects [3

3. D. G. Ouzounov, F. R. Ahmad, D. Mller, N. Venkataraman, M. T. Gallagher, M. G. Thomas, J. Silcox, K. W. Koch, and A. L. Gaeta, “Generation of Megawatt Optical Solitons in Hollow-Core Photonic Band-Gap Fibers,” Science 301, 1702–1704 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 4

4. A. R. Bhagwat and A. L. Gaeta, “Nonlinear optics in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers,” Opt. Express 16, 5035–5047 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

Recently, a novel class of PCFs has been reported, attracting intense interest. These are hollow-core, with a Kagome or square-lattice cladding [5

5. F. Couny, F. Benabid, and P. S. Light, “Large-pitch kagome-structured hollow-core photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3574–3576 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7

7. F. Couny, F. Benabid, P. J. Roberts, P. S. Light, and M. G. Raymer, “Generation and Photonic Guidance of Multi-Octave Optical-Frequency Combs,” Science 318, 1118–1121 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. The cladding configuration known as the ‘Kagome’ structure is formed by three parallel groups of glass struts at an angle of 4π/3 to each other, as shown in Fig. 1(a). Figure 1(b) shows a square-lattice hollow-core PCF, whose cladding structure has two sets of orthogonal glass strips. These PCFs have a large pitch, where Λ is typically 12 μm for Kagome PCFs [5

5. F. Couny, F. Benabid, and P. S. Light, “Large-pitch kagome-structured hollow-core photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3574–3576 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] and 15–17 μm for square-lattice PCFs [6

6. F. Couny, P. J. Roberts, T. A. Birks, and F. Benabid, “Square-lattice large-pitch hollow-core photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Express 16, 20626–20636 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. This makes light guidance possible in the visible optical spectrum. Moreover, they exhibit very wide high-transmission windows, several times broader than for bandgap-guiding hollow-core PCFs [5

5. F. Couny, F. Benabid, and P. S. Light, “Large-pitch kagome-structured hollow-core photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3574–3576 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 6

6. F. Couny, P. J. Roberts, T. A. Birks, and F. Benabid, “Square-lattice large-pitch hollow-core photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Express 16, 20626–20636 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. These advantages make them excellent candidates for nonlinear optical effects in gases. For instance, up to 45 coherent Stokes and anti-Stokes lines can be observed with wavelengths spanning from 325 nm to 2300 nm in hydrogen-filled Kagome PCFs [7

7. F. Couny, F. Benabid, P. J. Roberts, P. S. Light, and M. G. Raymer, “Generation and Photonic Guidance of Multi-Octave Optical-Frequency Combs,” Science 318, 1118–1121 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

Fig. 1 Schematic of transverse planes of hollow-core PCFs. The cladding structure in (a) is a Kagome lattice, (b) is a square-lattice hollow-core PCF. Corresponding scanning electron micrographs can be found in Refs. [6] and [7]. Rectangular model PCFs are shown in (c) and (d). (c) is a realistic model PCF in which the dielectric constant of the intersections is equal to that of the glass strips, as indicated in the inset. (d) is an ideal model structure for the application of the scalar governing equation; the inset shows that the intersections have a higher dielectric constant than the strips.

For a fuller understanding of this novel guidance mechanism, the central question about the origin and magnitude of the leakage should be physically answered. This will help to improve our understanding of the unique features of the guidance and provide a foundation for simplification and optimisation in simulations and fabrication. Analysis of PCFs is made difficult by the relatively complex geometry and the vector nature of the governing equations. In the transverse plane of PCFs, the transverse component of the magnetic field satisfies [11

11. A. W. Snyder and J. D. Love, Optical Waveguide Theory (Chapman & Hall, London, 1983).

]
(t2+n2k02β2)ht=(t×ht)×tlnn2,
(1)
where k 0 = 2π/λ and λ is the vacuum wavevector, β is the propagation constant, n 2 is the dielectric function which describes the transverse structure of the PCF, and ∇t is the transverse gradient operator. The vector character of Eq. (1) is contained in the right-hand side. Although numerical tools, such as the finite element method [12

12. S.-J. Im, A. Husakou, and J. Herrmann, “Guiding properties and dispersion control of kagome lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibers,” Opt. Express 17, 13050–13058 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] or boundary element method [13

13. L. Chen, “Modelling of photonic crystal fibres,” Ph.D. thesis, University of Bath (2009).

], can be used to obtain essentially exact solutions, this does not provide a physical understanding of the nature of the guidance.

In this paper and a following paper [14

14. L. Chen and D. M. Bird, “Guidance in Kagome-like photonic crystal fibres II: Perturbation theory for a realistic fibre structure,” Submitted to Opt. Express (2011).

] we take a new approach to analyse guidance in Kagome-like PCFs. Our aim is first to develop a simplified structure for which analytic solutions can be found. We then use perturbation theory to analyse the difference between our ideal structure and a realistic fibre, which enables us to develop methods for calculating the attenuation. The first simplification is to consider a scalar governing equation [11]:
(t2+n2k02β2)ht=0,
(2)
where the magnetic field h t is either x or y polarised in the transverse plane. Although this approximation has a limited quantitative accuracy, it provides a useful insight into a wide range of PCFs [15

15. T. Birks, D. Bird, T. Hedley, J. Pottage, and P. Russell, “Scaling laws and vector effects in bandgap-guiding fibres,” Opt. Express 12, 69–74 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. It also makes calculations more efficient. In our case we will solve Eq. (2) for a model structure and include vector terms as a perturbation.

This paper is organised as follows. In Section 2, the application of a transfer matrix method is demonstrated for calculating the cladding and guided modes within a supercell geometry for the idealised model structure. Section 3 presents results based on the analytic method derived in Section 2 and discusses the nature of the modes close to the air-line in terms of being air-guided or glass-guided. The conclusion is given in Section 4.

2. Solution for scalar model structure

2.1. Separation of variables

The model structure presented in Fig. 1(d) has an identical variation of the dielectric constant along both x and y directions in the transverse plane. This feature makes the two-dimensional dielectric function separable as
n2(x,y)=na2+Δn2(x)+Δn2(y),
(3)
where na2 is the dielectric constant for the air holes, and the function ▵n 2 gives the difference of the dielectric constant between the glass strips and air holes in each direction. Thus, ▵n 2 takes the value ng2na2 for the glass regions and zero for the air regions, where ng2 is the dielectric constant of glass. The value of the high dielectric constant at the intersections of the glass strips is therefore 2ng2na2. Because of this decomposition of the dielectric function, the field h(x, y) in the scalar governing equation can be separated as h(x,y) = X(x)Y(y). Substituting this into Eq. (2) leads to the dimensionless equations
d2X(x)dx2+[px(x)Λ]2X(x)=0,with[px(x)Λ]2=(k0Λ)2[na2+Δn2(x)](βΛ)2ξ
(4)
and
d2Y(y)dy2+[py(y)Λ]2Y(y)=0,with[py(y)Λ]2=(k0Λ)2Δn2(y)+ξ,
(5)
where a constant pitch Λ is introduced and ξ acts as a separation constant. The position variables, x and y, are now dimensionless through division by Λ. At the high-index intersections, the magnitude of the normalised transverse wavevector Kg takes the value: Kg2=(pxgΛ)2+(pygΛ)2=(k0Λ)2(2ng2na2)(βΛ)2, where the subscript g represents the values of px and py in the glass regions. A trigonometric function can thus be introduced to replace ξ and we write separable transverse wavevectors as
(pxgΛ)2=Kg2cos2θand(pygΛ)2=Kg2sin2θ,
(6)
where θ represents the angle relative to the x axis of the transverse wavevector in the high-index intersections. For simplicity a variable C = cos(2θ) is used to replace θ. The wavevector components can then be written as
(pxgΛ)2=Kg2(1+C)/2,(pygΛ)2=Kg2(1C)/2.
(7)
The equivalent expressions in the air regions become
(pxaΛ)2=Kg2(1+C)/2(k0Λ)2(ng2na2)
(8)
and
(pyaΛ)2=Kg2(1C)/2(k0Λ)2(ng2na2).
(9)

The scalar governing equation has been separated along two orthogonal directions and the solutions can be parameterised by the variables β and C. By looking at Eq. (7) or Eqs. (8) and (9), the solutions can be sorted into two types: ‘symmetric modes’ with C = 0 and ‘non-symmetric modes’ with C ≠ 0. These have the same or different transverse wavevector components in the x and y directions, respectively. The symmetric modes are important because, as we will show later, all the modes of the model structure can be derived from solutions with C = 0.

2.2. Matrix expressions for the fields

The separated Eqs. (4) and (5) can be solved analytically. In Ref. [18

18. P. S. J. Russell, T. A. Birks, and F. D. Lloyd-Lucas, “Photonic bloch waves and photonic band gaps,” in Confined Electrons and Photons: New Physics and Application, E. Burstein and C. Weisbuch, eds. (Plenum, New York, 1995), pp. 585–633.

] field expressions for a one-dimensional periodic dielectric stack have been derived. We now extend this method to a general arrangement of air and glass layers suitable for our model structure.

A schematic of the structure is shown in Fig. 2(a) (see the caption for detail). The solution of Eq. (4) in the Nth layer of this structure can be expressed as [18

18. P. S. J. Russell, T. A. Birks, and F. D. Lloyd-Lucas, “Photonic bloch waves and photonic band gaps,” in Confined Electrons and Photons: New Physics and Application, E. Burstein and C. Weisbuch, eds. (Plenum, New York, 1995), pp. 585–633.

]
Fig. 2 (a) Sketch of a general one-dimensional arrangement of air and glass regions. The light and dark colours represent air and glass, respectively. The widths of the Nth air and (N +1)th glass regions are haN and hgN+1. Here, xaN and xgN+1 are two arbitrary points within the air and glass. All the quantities are made dimensionless through division by Λ. (b) and (c) Examples of even and odd solutions in one dimension of an 8×8 supercell of the model structure.
XjN(x)=ajNcos[(pxjΛ)(xxjN)]+bjNsin[(pxjΛ)(xxjN)]/(pxjΛ),
(10)
where ajN and bjN are coefficients which determine the field, j = a,g represents air or glass respectively, and pxjΛ is the normalised wavevector component referring to material j. xjN denotes a reference point in the Nth segment and Λ is chosen as the pitch of the cladding structure. The expression in Eq. (10) has the advantage of algebraic convenience. The field coefficients, ajN and bjN, are always real even if β 2 is negative or pxj becomes zero. Moreover, waves in a stop band can also be expressed via real values of ajN and bjN [18

18. P. S. J. Russell, T. A. Birks, and F. D. Lloyd-Lucas, “Photonic bloch waves and photonic band gaps,” in Confined Electrons and Photons: New Physics and Application, E. Burstein and C. Weisbuch, eds. (Plenum, New York, 1995), pp. 585–633.

].

At the interface between the Nth and (N + 1)th layers (shown by the red line in Fig. 2 (a)), both the fields and their derivatives are continuous, leading to the matrix equation
(cos[(pxaΛ)haRN]sin[pxaΛ]haRN/(pxaΛ)(pxaΛ)sin[(pxaΛ)haRN]cos[(pxaΛ)haRN])(aaNbaN)=(cos[(pxaΛ)hgLN+1]sin[(pxgΛ)hgLN+1]/(pxgΛ)(pxgΛ)sin[(pxgΛ)hgLN+1]cos[pxgΛhgLN+1])(agN+1bgN+1),
(11)
where the dimensionless parameters haLN, haRN, hgLN+1 and hgRN+1 are defined in Fig. 2(a). For simplicity we choose the centre of each layer as the reference point and set haLN=haRN=hjN/2. Equation (11) then becomes
a_gN+1=m__(hgN+12,pxgΛ)1m__(haN2,pxaΛ)a_aN,
(12)
where
m__(h,p)=(cos(hp)sin(hp)/ppsin(hp)cos(hp))
(13)
and
a_jN=(ajN,bjN)T,a_jN+1=(ajN+1,bjN+1)T.
(14)
By using Eq. (12), the field in an arbitrary layer can be expressed in terms of the field in the adjacent layer.

2.3. Modes in a supercell geometry

The conversion of the two-dimensional problem into a one-dimensional one makes calculation of the modes in our rectangular model structure very efficient. The transfer matrix method is suitable for a number of geometries, including a perfect cladding, a defect in a cladding or a defect in a supercell geometry. The concept of the ‘supercell’ is often used in computational solutions [19

19. G. J. Pearce, T. D. Hedley, and D. M. Bird, “Adaptive curvilinear coordinates in a plane-wave solution of maxwell’s equations in photonic crystals,” Phys. Rev. B 71, 195108 (2005).

,20

20. G. Pearce, J. Pottage, D. Bird, P. Roberts, J. Knight, and P. Russell, “Hollow-core pcf for guidance in the mid to far infra-red,” Opt. Express 13, 6937–6946 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]; each supercell can be viewed as a large unit cell and contains N × N primitive cells in the transverse plane. In our analysis, we will use a supercell geometry because this leads to a finite number of calculated modes and, most importantly, the modes can be normalised, whether or not they are localised. This will be important in the perturbation analysis in the following paper. We focus only on the modes at the Γ point of the supercell Brillouin zone, which implies that the field coefficients in the centres of neighbouring supercells are the same for each mode. It is expected that the modes at the Γ point can effectively represent all the solutions within a supercell. With an increase of the supercell size, the area of the first Brillouin zone correspondingly decreases. The accuracy of Γ point sampling can be examined through tests of the convergence of solutions with respect to the size of the supercell.

3. Results in the scalar approximation

3.1. Guidance properties of rectangular hollow-core PCFs

In our simulations, we model a hollow-core PCF using glass strips with a thickness of 0.05Λ, where Λ is the pitch of the perfectly periodic cladding. The refractive indices are 1.0 for the air holes and 1.5 for the glass strips. The central defect is created by moving outward the four glass strips enclosing the central air hole by a distance of 0.125Λ. The arrangement of glass strips in one dimension of an 8 × 8 supercell is shown in Figs. 2(b) and 2(c).

When considering guidance in PCFs it is useful first to analyse the properties of the perfect periodic cladding structure. This is conveniently done by calculating the photonic density of states (PDOS) [21

21. J. Pottage, D. Bird, T. Hedley, J. Knight, T. Birks, P. Russell, and P. Roberts, “Robust photonic band gaps for hollow core guidance in pcf made from high index glass,” Opt. Express 11, 2854–2861 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

23

23. J. M. Stone, G. J. Pearce, F. Luan, T. A. Birks, J. C. Knight, A. K. George, and D. M. Bird, “An improved photonic bandgap fiber based on an array of rings,” Opt. Express 14, 6291–6296 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. The PDOS, as a function of normalised frequency, clearly shows the location of photonic bands and bandgaps. With our rectangular model structure, the method of Section 2 can be extended to calculate the PDOS of the perfect, infinite cladding by using Bloch’s theorem. Details of these calculations are given in Ref. [13

13. L. Chen, “Modelling of photonic crystal fibres,” Ph.D. thesis, University of Bath (2009).

].

The PDOS is shown in Fig. 3(a), as a function of the normalised frequency k 0Λ and the range of normalised propagation constants close to the air-line, i.e. (βk 0)Λ. The yellow and white regions represent photonic bands and bandgaps, respectively. It is observed that there is a sequence of bandgaps that cross the air-line.

Fig. 3 (a) PDOS and fundamental guided mode for the ideal model PCF structure of Fig. 1(d) and the scalar governing equation. The red line shows the propagation constant of the fundamental mode. The green and black lines are two frequencies for which the field of the modes are plotted in (b) and (c,d), respectively. (b) The fundamental mode with βΛ = 16.031 at k 0Λ = 16.5. (c) and (d) The fundamental and selected cladding mode with equivalent βΛ = 13.941 at k 0Λ = 14.5.

We now consider guided modes in the model structure with a central defect. The fundamental guided mode is shown by the red line in Fig. 3(a). This has been calculated by using the methodology of Section 2 with a 28 × 28 supercell. It is not surprising that a guided mode should exist within the bandgaps of the perfect cladding structure; an example of the fundamental mode at k 0Λ = 16.5 is given in Fig. 3(b). More surprisingly, we find that an exponentially localised mode exists for all normalised frequencies within the given range, whether or not there is a bandgap. An example is given in Fig. 3(c), and Fig. 3(d) shows a cladding state with the same frequency and propagation constant (to within 6 d.p.) as the guided mode in Fig. 3(c). As discussed in the introduction, this coexistence of localised and delocalised modes has been previously noted for our model structure in Ref. [16

16. S. Kawakami, “Analytically solvable model of photonic crystal structures and novel phenomena,” J. Lightwave Technol. 20, 1644–1650 (2002). [CrossRef]

]. In this paper, a leakage-free mode was found within a continuum of states at a given frequency when investigating photonic waveguides. For our application to PCFs, we note that the exponentially localised fundamental guided mode appears over a wide range of frequencies. There exists a resonant region (which starts in our case at k 0Λ = 56) where there is no guided mode; this occurs when a new one-dimensional mode is just trapped in the transverse direction across the glass strips [24

24. N. M. Litchinitser, A. K. Abeeluck, C. Headley, and B. J. Eggleton, “Antiresonant reflecting photonic crystal optical waveguides,” Opt. Lett. 27, 1592–1594 (2002). [CrossRef]

]. This will be discussed in more detail in a following paper [14

14. L. Chen and D. M. Bird, “Guidance in Kagome-like photonic crystal fibres II: Perturbation theory for a realistic fibre structure,” Submitted to Opt. Express (2011).

].

Both the coexistence of the fundamental and cladding modes at the same frequency and propagation constant, and the ultra-broad range of guided frequencies have been experimentally observed in Kagome [5

5. F. Couny, F. Benabid, and P. S. Light, “Large-pitch kagome-structured hollow-core photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3574–3576 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 7

7. F. Couny, F. Benabid, P. J. Roberts, P. S. Light, and M. G. Raymer, “Generation and Photonic Guidance of Multi-Octave Optical-Frequency Combs,” Science 318, 1118–1121 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] and square-lattice hollow-core [6

6. F. Couny, P. J. Roberts, T. A. Birks, and F. Benabid, “Square-lattice large-pitch hollow-core photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Express 16, 20626–20636 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] PCFs. It is for this reason that we believe that our model PCF structure can provide a useful basis for understanding the guidance mechanism in Kagome and square-lattice hollow-core PCFs.

3.2. Guided modes in the supercell geometry

In order to obtain a set of normalised modes, it is necessary to use a supercell geometry. To demonstrate the nature of the modes we choose an example normalised frequency of k 0Λ = 40, which lies within a band of cladding states. For convenience, in discussing the modes, we begin with a relatively small 8 × 8 supercell.

We first focus on the symmetric modes which have identical one-dimensional wavefunctions along the x and y directions (i.e. those with C = 0). It is convenient to consider these modes as being of three distinct types in terms of their propagation constants. The first is the set of air-guided modes just below the air-line. This set contains eight modes (which is associated with the size of the supercell chosen). These air-guided modes are well separated from other modes with lower values of βΛ. The transverse fields of this group of modes nearest to the air-line are shown in Fig. 4; among them is the fundamental guided mode, as shown by Fig. 4(a). The wavefunctions are both even in modes (a) to (e) and both odd in modes (f) to (h) in Fig. 4.

Fig. 4 Field plots in the transverse plane for symmetric modes (i.e. C = 0) close to the air-line. The normalised frequency is k 0Λ = 40, and the (βΛ)2 values of these modes vary from 1572.73 to 1587.12. The fundamental mode is shown in (a).

Another group of modes is found with propagation constants well above the air-line. Eight modes are located at (βΛ)2 = 3611.54, with extremely small differences in the (βΛ)2 values of less than 10−7. Plots of these modes are shown in Fig. 5, where it can be seen that the fields are located in the high-index intersections of the glass strips. Owing to this property, these modes are referred to as ‘high-index modes’.

Fig. 5 (a) Schematic diagram of the two regions in which the field is concentrated for high-index modes in an 8×8 supercell. (b–e) Four modes with fields localised in the blue regions in (a). Modes (b) and (c) have even waves in both directions; (d) and (e) have odd waves along the axes. Four other modes have a similar field pattern, but in the green regions of (a).

Fig. 6 Example plots of symmetric solutions with delocalised fields. The (βΛ)2 values are 535.01, 498.25 and −344.78 for (a), (b) and (c), respectively. Note that only the region close to the central defect is shown.

To form a complete mode map, the non-symmetric modes must also be considered. In principle, every pair of symmetric modes can be combined to give two non-symmetric modes with identical propagation constants but opposite C values. In practice, we are interested only in modes with propagation constants close to the fundamental guided mode. Therefore, there are only two relevant choices of combination of symmetric modes. One is the internal combination of the air-guided modes shown in Fig. 4; the other involves a high-index mode and a delocalised mode, as shown in Figs. 5 and 6, respectively.

Figures 7(a) and 7(b) show an example pair of combined air-guided modes, the field patterns of which differ by an angle of π/2 in the transverse plane because of the opposite C values. The field intensity is still mainly confined in the air holes. Figures 7(c) and 7(d) display examples of the modes formed by a combination of high-index modes and delocalised modes. These modes are glass-guided, and their fields are concentrated along the glass strips. Because of the large number of delocalised modes, these glass-guided modes evenly cover a broad region of βΛ values and are therefore likely to become very close to the fundamental mode. As observed in Kagome and square-lattice hollow-core PCFs [6

6. F. Couny, P. J. Roberts, T. A. Birks, and F. Benabid, “Square-lattice large-pitch hollow-core photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Express 16, 20626–20636 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 7

7. F. Couny, F. Benabid, P. J. Roberts, P. S. Light, and M. G. Raymer, “Generation and Photonic Guidance of Multi-Octave Optical-Frequency Combs,” Science 318, 1118–1121 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], the glass-guided modes are characterised by dramatic oscillation of the spatial fields. Owing to the obvious mismatch of spatial frequencies between the fundamental mode and the glass-guided modes, it can be supposed that there is a suppressed coupling between the two. The leakage caused by the glass-guided modes is therefore expected to be relatively small. This point will be analysed further in a following paper [14

14. L. Chen and D. M. Bird, “Guidance in Kagome-like photonic crystal fibres II: Perturbation theory for a realistic fibre structure,” Submitted to Opt. Express (2011).

].

Fig. 7 Two examples of pairs of non-symmetric modes. (a) and (b) Air-guided modes generated by the symmetric modes shown in Figs. 4(a) and 4(e). (c) and (d) Glass-guided modes formed by the combination of the high-index mode of Fig. 5(b) and the delocalised mode of Fig. 6(a). The (βΛ)2 values are 1579.93 for modes (a) and (b), and 2073.28 for modes (c) and (d).

4. Conclusion

Transfer matrix methods have been developed for an idealised rectangular hollow-core PCF. Within the scalar approximation, a complete set of modes can be calculated within a supercell geometry. For modes near the air-line there is a clear discrimination into air-guided and glass-guided modes. The existence of an exponentially localised fundamental mode with the same propagation constant as cladding states shows that the model hollow-core PCF can be identified as a prototype of the PCF family that governs light via the weak interaction of modes. This analysis will be extended in a following paper where perturbation theory is used to consider the effects of vector terms in the governing equation and the unrealistic high-index intersections of the idealised model structure.

Acknowledgments

We thank Fetah Benabid and John Roberts for helpful discussions in the course of this work.

References and links

1.

R. F. Cregan, B. J. Mangan, J. C. Knight, T. A. Birks, P. S. J. Russell, P. J. Roberts, and D. C. Allan, “Single-Mode Photonic Band Gap Guidance of Light in Air,” Science 285, 1537–1539 (1999). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

2.

P. Roberts, F. Couny, H. Sabert, B. Mangan, D. Williams, L. Farr, M. Mason, A. Tomlinson, T. Birks, J. Knight, and P. S. J. Russell, “Ultimate low loss of hollow-core photonic crystal fibres,” Opt. Express 13, 236–244 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

D. G. Ouzounov, F. R. Ahmad, D. Mller, N. Venkataraman, M. T. Gallagher, M. G. Thomas, J. Silcox, K. W. Koch, and A. L. Gaeta, “Generation of Megawatt Optical Solitons in Hollow-Core Photonic Band-Gap Fibers,” Science 301, 1702–1704 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

A. R. Bhagwat and A. L. Gaeta, “Nonlinear optics in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers,” Opt. Express 16, 5035–5047 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

F. Couny, F. Benabid, and P. S. Light, “Large-pitch kagome-structured hollow-core photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3574–3576 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

F. Couny, P. J. Roberts, T. A. Birks, and F. Benabid, “Square-lattice large-pitch hollow-core photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Express 16, 20626–20636 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

F. Couny, F. Benabid, P. J. Roberts, P. S. Light, and M. G. Raymer, “Generation and Photonic Guidance of Multi-Octave Optical-Frequency Combs,” Science 318, 1118–1121 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

A. Argyros and J. Pla, “Hollow-core polymer fibres with a kagome lattice: potential for transmission in the infrared,” Opt. Express 15, 7713–7719 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9.

G. J. Pearce, G. S. Wiederhecker, C. G. Poulton, S. Burger, and P. S. J. Russell, “Models for guidance in kagome-structured hollow-core photonic crystal fibres,” Opt. Express 15, 12680–12685 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

10.

S. Février, B. Beaudou, and P. Viale, “Understanding origin of loss in large pitch hollow-core photonic crystal fibers and their design simplification,” Opt. Express 18, 5142–5150 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

A. W. Snyder and J. D. Love, Optical Waveguide Theory (Chapman & Hall, London, 1983).

12.

S.-J. Im, A. Husakou, and J. Herrmann, “Guiding properties and dispersion control of kagome lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibers,” Opt. Express 17, 13050–13058 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

L. Chen, “Modelling of photonic crystal fibres,” Ph.D. thesis, University of Bath (2009).

14.

L. Chen and D. M. Bird, “Guidance in Kagome-like photonic crystal fibres II: Perturbation theory for a realistic fibre structure,” Submitted to Opt. Express (2011).

15.

T. Birks, D. Bird, T. Hedley, J. Pottage, and P. Russell, “Scaling laws and vector effects in bandgap-guiding fibres,” Opt. Express 12, 69–74 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

S. Kawakami, “Analytically solvable model of photonic crystal structures and novel phenomena,” J. Lightwave Technol. 20, 1644–1650 (2002). [CrossRef]

17.

A. Kumar, A. N. Kaul, and A. K. Ghatak, “Prediction of coupling length in a rectangular-core directional coupler: an accurate analysis,” Opt. Lett. 10, 86–88 (1985). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

18.

P. S. J. Russell, T. A. Birks, and F. D. Lloyd-Lucas, “Photonic bloch waves and photonic band gaps,” in Confined Electrons and Photons: New Physics and Application, E. Burstein and C. Weisbuch, eds. (Plenum, New York, 1995), pp. 585–633.

19.

G. J. Pearce, T. D. Hedley, and D. M. Bird, “Adaptive curvilinear coordinates in a plane-wave solution of maxwell’s equations in photonic crystals,” Phys. Rev. B 71, 195108 (2005).

20.

G. Pearce, J. Pottage, D. Bird, P. Roberts, J. Knight, and P. Russell, “Hollow-core pcf for guidance in the mid to far infra-red,” Opt. Express 13, 6937–6946 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

21.

J. Pottage, D. Bird, T. Hedley, J. Knight, T. Birks, P. Russell, and P. Roberts, “Robust photonic band gaps for hollow core guidance in pcf made from high index glass,” Opt. Express 11, 2854–2861 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

22.

T. A. Birks, G. J. Pearce, and D. M. Bird, “Approximate band structure calculation for photonic bandgap fibres,” Opt. Express 14, 9483–9490 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

23.

J. M. Stone, G. J. Pearce, F. Luan, T. A. Birks, J. C. Knight, A. K. George, and D. M. Bird, “An improved photonic bandgap fiber based on an array of rings,” Opt. Express 14, 6291–6296 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

24.

N. M. Litchinitser, A. K. Abeeluck, C. Headley, and B. J. Eggleton, “Antiresonant reflecting photonic crystal optical waveguides,” Opt. Lett. 27, 1592–1594 (2002). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(060.2280) Fiber optics and optical communications : Fiber design and fabrication
(060.2400) Fiber optics and optical communications : Fiber properties

ToC Category:
Fiber Optics and Optical Communications

History
Original Manuscript: January 27, 2011
Manuscript Accepted: March 9, 2011
Published: March 25, 2011

Citation
Lei Chen, Greg J. Pearce, Timothy A. Birks, and David M. Bird, "Guidance in Kagome-like photonic crystal fibres I: analysis of an ideal fibre structure," Opt. Express 19, 6945-6956 (2011)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-19-7-6945


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References

  1. R. F. Cregan, B. J. Mangan, J. C. Knight, T. A. Birks, P. S. J. Russell, P. J. Roberts, and D. C. Allan, “Single-Mode Photonic Band Gap Guidance of Light in Air,” Science 285, 1537–1539 (1999). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. P. Roberts, F. Couny, H. Sabert, B. Mangan, D. Williams, L. Farr, M. Mason, A. Tomlinson, T. Birks, J. Knight, and P. S. J. Russell, “Ultimate low loss of hollow-core photonic crystal fibres,” Opt. Express 13, 236–244 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. D. G. Ouzounov, F. R. Ahmad, D. Mller, N. Venkataraman, M. T. Gallagher, M. G. Thomas, J. Silcox, K. W. Koch, and A. L. Gaeta, “Generation of Megawatt Optical Solitons in Hollow-Core Photonic Band-Gap Fibers,” Science 301, 1702–1704 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. A. R. Bhagwat and A. L. Gaeta, “Nonlinear optics in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers,” Opt. Express 16, 5035–5047 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. F. Couny, F. Benabid, and P. S. Light, “Large-pitch kagome-structured hollow-core photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3574–3576 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. F. Couny, P. J. Roberts, T. A. Birks, and F. Benabid, “Square-lattice large-pitch hollow-core photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Express 16, 20626–20636 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. F. Couny, F. Benabid, P. J. Roberts, P. S. Light, and M. G. Raymer, “Generation and Photonic Guidance of Multi-Octave Optical-Frequency Combs,” Science 318, 1118–1121 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  8. A. Argyros and J. Pla, “Hollow-core polymer fibres with a kagome lattice: potential for transmission in the infrared,” Opt. Express 15, 7713–7719 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  9. G. J. Pearce, G. S. Wiederhecker, C. G. Poulton, S. Burger, and P. S. J. Russell, “Models for guidance in kagome-structured hollow-core photonic crystal fibres,” Opt. Express 15, 12680–12685 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  10. S. Février, B. Beaudou, and P. Viale, “Understanding origin of loss in large pitch hollow-core photonic crystal fibers and their design simplification,” Opt. Express 18, 5142–5150 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. A. W. Snyder and J. D. Love, Optical Waveguide Theory (Chapman & Hall, London, 1983).
  12. S.-J. Im, A. Husakou, and J. Herrmann, “Guiding properties and dispersion control of kagome lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibers,” Opt. Express 17, 13050–13058 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. L. Chen, “Modelling of photonic crystal fibres,” Ph.D. thesis, University of Bath (2009).
  14. L. Chen and D. M. Bird, “Guidance in Kagome-like photonic crystal fibres II: Perturbation theory for a realistic fibre structure,” Submitted to Opt. Express (2011).
  15. T. Birks, D. Bird, T. Hedley, J. Pottage, and P. Russell, “Scaling laws and vector effects in bandgap-guiding fibres,” Opt. Express 12, 69–74 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  16. S. Kawakami, “Analytically solvable model of photonic crystal structures and novel phenomena,” J. Lightwave Technol. 20, 1644–1650 (2002). [CrossRef]
  17. A. Kumar, A. N. Kaul, and A. K. Ghatak, “Prediction of coupling length in a rectangular-core directional coupler: an accurate analysis,” Opt. Lett. 10, 86–88 (1985). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  18. P. S. J. Russell, T. A. Birks, and F. D. Lloyd-Lucas, “Photonic bloch waves and photonic band gaps,” in Confined Electrons and Photons: New Physics and Application , E. Burstein and C. Weisbuch, eds. (Plenum, New York, 1995), pp. 585–633.
  19. G. J. Pearce, T. D. Hedley, and D. M. Bird, “Adaptive curvilinear coordinates in a plane-wave solution of maxwell’s equations in photonic crystals,” Phys. Rev. B 71, 195108 (2005).
  20. G. Pearce, J. Pottage, D. Bird, P. Roberts, J. Knight, and P. Russell, “Hollow-core pcf for guidance in the mid to far infra-red,” Opt. Express 13, 6937–6946 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  21. J. Pottage, D. Bird, T. Hedley, J. Knight, T. Birks, P. Russell, and P. Roberts, “Robust photonic band gaps for hollow core guidance in pcf made from high index glass,” Opt. Express 11, 2854–2861 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  22. T. A. Birks, G. J. Pearce, and D. M. Bird, “Approximate band structure calculation for photonic bandgap fibres,” Opt. Express 14, 9483–9490 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  23. J. M. Stone, G. J. Pearce, F. Luan, T. A. Birks, J. C. Knight, A. K. George, and D. M. Bird, “An improved photonic bandgap fiber based on an array of rings,” Opt. Express 14, 6291–6296 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  24. N. M. Litchinitser, A. K. Abeeluck, C. Headley, and B. J. Eggleton, “Antiresonant reflecting photonic crystal optical waveguides,” Opt. Lett. 27, 1592–1594 (2002). [CrossRef]

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