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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: J. H. Eberly
  • Vol. 2, Iss. 4 — Feb. 16, 1998
  • pp: 151–156
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Spontaneous emission control in quantum well laser diodes

H.D. Summers, G.M. Berry, G.W. Lewis, and P. Blood  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 2, Issue 4, pp. 151-156 (1998)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.2.000151


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Abstract

Spontaneous emission control has been achieved in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well lasers by the use of Bragg reflectors to define a micro-cavity perpendicular to the quantum wells. The room temperature emission is inhibited whilst below 130K there is an enhancement. These changes to the spontaneous recombination process directly effect the threshold current producing a 25% reduction at room temperature. Theoretical modeling of the lasers is in agreement with the experimental results and highlights the effect of the micro-cavity in altering the overlap of the electro-magnetic field with the quantum well dipole oscillators.

© Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

A simpler approach to limiting the spontaneous emission is to ensure that higher energy electronic states remain unoccupied by reducing the quasi-Fermi-level energies within the semiconductor. The most immediate way of doing this is to keep the losses within the laser cavity to a minimum to reduce the threshold gain value and hence the injected charge carrier density. The use of pseudomorphic quantum wells also reduces the quasi-Fermi levels due to the strain induced changes in the electronic band structure. In particular, the reduced density of states in the valence band and the increased energy separation of the light and heavy hole bands lead to a reduction in the spontaneous emission from the higher energy sub-bands of the quantum well [3

3. H.D. Summers, P. Mogensen, P. Rees, and P. Blood, “Recombination mechanisms and optical losses in strained layer, (AlyGa1-y)xIn1-xP lasers,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, Vol. 8 of 1994 OSA Technical Digest Series (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C.,1994) CThF4, p. 304.

].

The existence of a broad band of electronic states is not sufficient in itself to increase the threshold current. The key factor which determines the amount of spontaneous recombination is the recombination time, τspon and it is this parameter which controls the contribution of the spontaneous recombination path to the total current. Thus above threshold the differential efficiency of an ideal laser tends to unity because the stimulated recombination lifetime, τstim ≪ τspon and the vast majority of injected carriers undergo stimulated recombination. The detrimental effect of the spontaneous recombination current can therefore be reduced by increasing the τspon of the electronic states rather than decreasing their energy distribution. The recombination lifetime is dependent upon the density of electro-magnetic field modes into which the electron dipole oscillator can couple. The spontaneous emission problem can thus be addressed from the alternative perspective of altering the photonic rather than the electronic mode density. In this paper we present details of experiments following this approach in which the optical mode distribution within edge-emitting diode lasers has been altered. This has been achieved by the use of Bragg reflectors to define a micro-cavity perpendicular to the quantum well plane. The micro-cavity is designed such that all allowed photon modes lie at wavelengths outside of the quantum well, free-space, spontaneous emission spectrum. The emission in the perpendicular direction is therefore inhibited leading to an increased τspon and a reduced recombination current. These experiments are similar in concept to recent work on resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes [4

4. M.S. Ünlü and S. Strite, “Resonant cavity enhanced photonic devices”, J. Appl. Phys. , 78, 607–639, (1995). [CrossRef]

] with the contrast that in the LED’s the micro-cavity increases the optical mode density within the emission spectrum and hence enhances rather than inhibits the spontaneous emission. We show that the inclusion of a vertical micro-cavity can decrease the room temperature threshold current of an edge-emitting laser by up to 25% and also present calculations from a theoretical model which confirm that this reduction is due to inhibition of the spontaneous recombination within the quantum wells.

2. Experiment

The experimental structures were grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) and contain three 80Å GaAs quantum wells, separated by 80Å Al0.23Ga0.77As barriers, within a 3200Å wide, Al0.3Ga0.7As waveguide. The waveguide core is bounded by AlAs/Al0.14Ga0.86As Bragg reflector pairs; 17 periods in the p-type mirror and 27 periods in the n-type. A conventional separate confinement heterostructure was grown as a control sample with the same quantum well and waveguide structure and with Al0.58Ga0.42As cladding layers. The cladding layers were designed to match the effective refractive index of the Bragg stacks and hence provide the same optical confinement factor as the micro-cavity laser sample. The wafers were processed into 50μm wide oxide stripe lasers and driven with 250ns long pulses at a 1khz repetition frequency.

A number of initial experiments were carried out to confirm that the two samples were identical apart from the Bragg reflectors :

  • The slopes of the light-current characteristic, above threshold, were similar indicating similar values of the internal quantum efficiency, ηi.
  • The near and far-field radiation patterns were the same indicating a common value for the optical confinement factor, Γ.
  • The lasing wavelength is the same for both sets of samples over a wide temperature range (100K–300K) indicating the same quantum well structure.

Thus any differences in the performance of the two samples can be attributed to the presence of the micro-cavity. Devices of all lengths containing the Bragg reflectors showed a 25% reduction in room temperature threshold current compared to the control lasers. Analysis of the Jth versus 1/Lc data confirms that the two sets of lasers have similar values of the gain coefficient, gt and so the lower Jth values in the micro-cavity lasers are not due to differences in their intrinsic gain vs carrier density characteristics [5

5. F. Yang, P. Blood, and J.S. Roberts, “Edge-emitting quantum well laser with Bragg reflectors,” Appl. Phys. Lett. , 66, 2949–2951, (1995). [CrossRef]

].

The reduction in Jth cannot be unambiguously attributed to an inhibition of the spontaneous emission, however, as other processes must be considered :

  1. The analysis described above only considers radiative recombination and the differences in threshold current could be due to non-radiative recombination currents.
  2. The thermal activation energy of charge carriers out of the quantum wells may be different in the two samples thus giving different leakage currents.
  3. The reduction in threshold current could be due to photon recycling by the Bragg mirrors which increases the effective spontaneous recombination lifetime.

The reflection spectrum of the Bragg stacks shifts very little with temperature whereas the spontaneous emission spectrum should move at a rate determined by the temperature coefficient of the bandgap. Thus by changing the temperature the spontaneous emission spectrum can be moved outside the reflection spectrum of the mirrors. If the observed threshold current differences are due to (i) above they should still be observed at low temperature; if they are due to (ii) or (iii) the plots of Jth vs T should converge. The change in wavelength of the cavity mode and emission spectrum can be seen in the spontaneous emission spectra, shown in figure 1. At room temperature the cavity mode lies well away from the spontaneous emission peak. As the temperature is decreased the emission peak blue shifts with the QW bandgap, ~ 2ÅK-1, whilst the cavity mode blue shifts at a lower rate of ~ 0.3ÅK-1.

Fig. 1. Spontaneous emission spectra from the micro-cavity lasers measured normal to the quantum well plane.

Thus the relative wavelength changes bring the spontaneous emission spectrum closer to the cavity mode. Therefore to differentiate between processes i–iii outlined above, and spontaneous emission control effects, the threshold current of the lasers was measured as a function of temperature; the results are shown in figure 2.

Fig. 2. Measured threshold current density as a function of temperature for the micro-cavity lasers (full circles) and the control sample (open circles).

3. Theory

To validate the hypothesis outlined above and to provide further insight into the physical processes affecting Jth we have developed a theoretical model of the laser structures which includes the following features :

  • The electro-magnetic field states are calculated, for both TE and TM polarisations, from the boundary conditions of the two structures using a three-dimensional Transfer Matrix Method [6

    6. R.E. Collins, Field theory of guided waves, (IEEE Press, Washington, DC,1991).

    ].
  • The spontaneous emission rate is then obtained by considering the interaction of the electronic dipole oscillators with each of the electro-magnetic modes, according to Fermi’s Golden Rule. This is described in equation 1:
Rspon=kΣ[(Mkehh2Γk)(Ndip)k+(Mkelh2Γk)(Ndip)k]
(1)

The strength of the photon-electron coupling is determined by the dipole matrix element, Mk for electron to heavy and light hole transitions and the optical overlap factor of the electro-magnetic mode with the quantum wells, Γk. The total recombination rate for a particular k-state is then a product of the coupling strength and the number of electron dipole oscillators within the well, Ndip, which is calculated using standard semiconductor electronic theory [7

7. P. Rees, R.A.H. Hamilton, P. Blood, and S.V. Burke, “Carrier-carrier scattering effects in InGaAs-GaAs”, IEE Proc.-J: Optoelectron. 140, 81–84, (1993). [CrossRef]

]. The calculation range for the k-vector is set to cover the emission spectrum of the quantum wells. It is important to note that the dipole oscillator orientation is not fixed but is determined by the wave vector of the electronic states within the quantum well as described by the semiconductor band structure.

  • A homogeneous optical scattering loss, αi=10cm-1 is included within the complex part of the refractive index to account for the reduction in the cavity Q due to loss within the Bragg stacks.
  • The effects of electronic, carrier-carrier scattering are implemented as a constant lifetime (τ=0.1ps), Lorentzian broadening of the optical transitions.
  • When calculating the temperature dependence of Rspon the reflectivity spectrum of the Bragg stacks is shifted relative to the quantum well emission spectrum by the rate shown in the experimental results of figure 1.
  • The model also calculates the optical gain within the quantum wells and this is used to set the carrier density at which Rspon is found.

The results from the model for the structures described earlier are shown in figure 3. The data shown is for a typical threshold gain, gth = 1,000cm-1well-1. The modeled results are in excellent agreement with experiment (fig. 2). The model confirms that both inhibition and enhancement of the spontaneous emission can be achieved with a micro-cavity structure and that these changes directly effect the recombination current. Analysis of the model shows that the primary effect of the micro-cavity is to alter the optical overlap factor, Γk. At room temperature the electro-magnetic field strength of the cavity modes within the spontaneous emission spectrum is minimised at the quantum wells thus reducing the dipole interaction. At low temperatures the field at these wavelengths forms standing wave modes, peaked at the quantum wells, which give enhanced coupling with the electronic dipole.

Fig. 3. Calculated threshold current density as a function of temperature for the micro-cavity lasers (full circles) and the control sample (open circles).

4. Summary

We have fabricated edge-emitting GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well lasers with a vertical micro-cavity in order to control the spontaneous emission from the wells. At room temperature the devices exhibit a 25% reduction in threshold current compared to control lasers whilst at low temperature their threshold current is higher than the standard devices. Analysis of these structures by detailed theoretical modeling indicates that the Bragg reflectors in the micro-cavity sample can either inhibit or enhance the spontaneous emission thus altering the emission rate and changing the device threshold current. The model shows that the process producing these changes is the change in the overlap of the electromagnetic field modes with the electronic dipoles within the quantum wells.

References and links

1.

L.A. Coldren and S.W. Corzine, Diode Lasers and Photonic Integrated Circuits, (Wiley, New York,1995).

2.

P. Blood, A.I. Kucharska, C.T. Foxon, and K. Griffiths, “Temperature dependence of spontaneous emission in GaAs-AlGaAs quantum well lasers,” Appl. Phys. Lett. , 55, 1167–1169, (1989). [CrossRef]

3.

H.D. Summers, P. Mogensen, P. Rees, and P. Blood, “Recombination mechanisms and optical losses in strained layer, (AlyGa1-y)xIn1-xP lasers,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, Vol. 8 of 1994 OSA Technical Digest Series (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C.,1994) CThF4, p. 304.

4.

M.S. Ünlü and S. Strite, “Resonant cavity enhanced photonic devices”, J. Appl. Phys. , 78, 607–639, (1995). [CrossRef]

5.

F. Yang, P. Blood, and J.S. Roberts, “Edge-emitting quantum well laser with Bragg reflectors,” Appl. Phys. Lett. , 66, 2949–2951, (1995). [CrossRef]

6.

R.E. Collins, Field theory of guided waves, (IEEE Press, Washington, DC,1991).

7.

P. Rees, R.A.H. Hamilton, P. Blood, and S.V. Burke, “Carrier-carrier scattering effects in InGaAs-GaAs”, IEE Proc.-J: Optoelectron. 140, 81–84, (1993). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(230.5590) Optical devices : Quantum-well, -wire and -dot devices
(250.0250) Optoelectronics : Optoelectronics

ToC Category:
Focus Issue: Quantum well laser design

History
Original Manuscript: October 8, 1997
Published: February 16, 1998

Citation
Huw Summers, G. Berry, Gareth Lewis, and Peter Blood, "Spontaneous emission control in quantum well laser diodes," Opt. Express 2, 151-156 (1998)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-2-4-151


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References

  1. L.A. Coldren and S.W. Corzine, Diode Lasers and Photonic Integrated Circuits, (Wiley, New York, 1995).
  2. P. Blood, A.I. Kucharska, C.T. Foxon and K. Griffiths, "Temperature dependence of spontaneous emission in GaAs-AlGaAs quantum well lasers," Appl. Phys. Lett., 55, 1167-1169, (1989). [CrossRef]
  3. H.D. Summers, P. Mogensen, P. Rees and P. Blood, "Recombination mechanisms and optical losses in strained layer, (AlyGa1-y)xIn1-xP lasers," in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, Vol. 8 of 1994 OSA Technical Digest Series (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C., 1994) CThF4, p. 304.
  4. M.S. Uenlue and S. Strite, "Resonant cavity enhanced photonic devices," J. Appl. Phys., 78, 607-639, (1995). [CrossRef]
  5. F. Yang, P. Blood and J.S. Roberts, "Edge-emitting quantum well laser with Bragg reflectors," Appl. Phys. Lett., 66, 2949-2951, (1995). [CrossRef]
  6. R.E. Collins, Field theory of guided waves, (IEEE Press, Washington, DC, 1991).
  7. P. Rees, R.A.H. Hamilton, P. Blood and S.V. Burke, "Carrier-carrier scattering effects in InGaAs-GaAs," IEE Proc.-J: Optoelectron. 140, 81-84, (1993). [CrossRef]

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