OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: J. H. Eberly
  • Vol. 2, Iss. 6 — Mar. 16, 1998
  • pp: 212–212
« Show journal navigation

Focus Issue: Tomographic Image Reconstruction

Harrison H. Barrett and Donald W. Wilson  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 2, Issue 6, pp. 212-212 (1998)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.2.000212


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (6 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

This issue of Optics Express provides a snapshot of current theoretical research in the area of tomographic image reconstruction. The topics have been chosen to illustrate some important principles that arise not only in medical imaging but also in the broader arena of indirect imaging. All of the papers were invited by the editors, and all underwent independent peer review.

© Optical Society of America

Introduction

This issue of Optics Express provides a snapshot of current theoretical research in the area of tomographic image reconstruction. The topics have been chosen to illustrate some important principles that arise not only in medical imaging but also in the broader arena of indirect imaging. All of the papers were invited by the editors, and all underwent independent peer review.

The first paper, by Arridge and Schweiger, deals with optical tomography, where light propagates through a turbid medium such as brain tissue. In spite of the diffusive nature of this propagation, it is possible to reconstruct many features of clinical interest. Arridge and Schweiger have been leaders in bringing sophisticated mathematics to this problem, and in the current paper they employ the powerful technique of adjoint differentiation.

The second paper, by Cunningham, Hanson and Battle, also uses adjoint differentiation, but applied to extremely ill-posed problems in gamma-ray tomography, specifically imaging of the beating heart. This group has been instrumental in emphasizing the role of Bayesian methods in image reconstruction, and here they use the adjoint method to maximize the posterior probability of an object model given some very noisy data. The resulting images yield remarkably accurate estimates of ventricular volume.

The paper by Fessler does not deal with tomography per se, but rather with pinhole imaging, which forms the basis for many tomographic imaging systems. Through careful analysis, characteristic of the author, the tradeoff between spatial resolution and noise is studied and optimized.

Wilson and Barrett consider the effect of null functions, an inevitable feature of imaging systems that measure a discrete set of data from a continuous object. They give a practical algorithm for ascertaining the null component of any object with respect to any imaging system, and they illustrate its use by application to a real pinhole-imaging system.

ToC Category:
Focus Issue: Tomographic image reconstruction

History
Original Manuscript: March 16, 1998
Published: March 16, 1998

Citation
Harrison Barrett and Donald Wilson, "Introduction," Opt. Express 2, 212-212 (1998)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-2-6-212


Sort:  Journal  |  Reset  

References

References are not available for this paper.

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.


Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited