OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 20, Iss. 18 — Aug. 27, 2012
  • pp: 19778–19786
« Show journal navigation

Two-dimensional plasma current and optimized terahertz generation in two-color photoionization

T. I. Oh, Y. S. You, and K. Y. Kim  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 20, Issue 18, pp. 19778-19786 (2012)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.20.019778


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (1076 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

Two-dimensional (2-D) transverse photocurrent generation is studied and applied to control and optimize terahertz energy and polarization in two-color, laser-produced air filaments. A full control of terahertz output is demonstrated and explained in the context of 2-D photocurrent model.

© 2012 OSA

1. Introduction

Recently, terahertz (THz) generation via two-color laser mixing in air [1

1. D. J. Cook and R. M. Hochstrasser, “Intense terahertz pulses by four-wave rectification in air,” Opt. Lett. 25(16), 1210–1212 (2000). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

17

17. J. Dai, B. Clough, I.-C. Ho, X. Lu, J. Liu, and X.-C. Zhang, “Recent Progresses in Terahertz Wave Air Photonics,” IEEE Trans. THz Sci. Tech. (Paris) 1(1), 274–281 (2011). [CrossRef]

] has attracted a considerable amount of interest owing to its capability of producing broadband and high-power THz pulses [7

7. K. Y. Kim, J. H. Glownia, A. J. Taylor, and G. Rodriguez, “Terahertz emission from ultrafast ionizing air in symmetry-broken laser fields,” Opt. Express 15(8), 4577–4584 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9

9. K. Y. Kim, “Generation of coherent terahertz radiation in ultrafast laser-gas interactions,” Phys. Plasmas 16(5), 056706 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. In this scheme, an ultrashort pulsed laser’s fundamental (ω) and its second harmonic (2ω) pulses are co-focused in air to ionize air molecules. From the ionized air plasma, intense THz radiation is observed to emerge. The nonlinearity responsible for such THz generation originates from rapid tunneling ionization and subsequent electron motion in a symmetry-broken electric field [7

7. K. Y. Kim, J. H. Glownia, A. J. Taylor, and G. Rodriguez, “Terahertz emission from ultrafast ionizing air in symmetry-broken laser fields,” Opt. Express 15(8), 4577–4584 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9

9. K. Y. Kim, “Generation of coherent terahertz radiation in ultrafast laser-gas interactions,” Phys. Plasmas 16(5), 056706 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. This so-called plasma (or photo) current model [7

7. K. Y. Kim, J. H. Glownia, A. J. Taylor, and G. Rodriguez, “Terahertz emission from ultrafast ionizing air in symmetry-broken laser fields,” Opt. Express 15(8), 4577–4584 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9

9. K. Y. Kim, “Generation of coherent terahertz radiation in ultrafast laser-gas interactions,” Phys. Plasmas 16(5), 056706 (2009). [CrossRef]

] can explain the microscopic origin of the third order nonlinearity χ(3) (generally all high order nonlinearities χ(n)) in THz generation via two-color photoionization.

To avoid the phase instability problem, most two-color photoionization experiments adopt an all-in-line second harmonic and THz generation arrangement as shown in Fig. 1(a)
Fig. 1 (a) Schematic of all-in-line second harmonic and THz generation. (b) Vector diagram for fundamental (Eω) and its second harmonic (E2ω) generation before the BBO crystal and at the front end of plasma filament. ô and ê represent the ordinary and extraordinary axes of the BBO crystal respectively. Eωo and Eωe, polarized along the ordinary (ô) and extraordinary (ê) axes of the crystal.
. However, in this scheme, the BBO crystal needs to be azimuthally oriented such that the ω field has a component parallel to the 2ω field polarized in the extraordinary (ê) axis of the BBO crystal. In this case, the fundamental pulse becomes elliptically polarized after passing through the crystal whereas the second harmonic remains polarized along the extraordinary axis. This setting invokes two-dimensional (2-D) transverse electron currents for THz generation [13

13. H. Wen and A. M. Lindenberg, “Coherent Terahertz polarization control through manipulation of Electron trajectories,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 103(2), 023902 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Previously, it is shown that the polarization of THz radiation is sensitive to the phase difference between the fundamental and second harmonic fields [13

13. H. Wen and A. M. Lindenberg, “Coherent Terahertz polarization control through manipulation of Electron trajectories,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 103(2), 023902 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 14

14. J. Dai, N. Karpowicz, and X.-C. Zhang, “Coherent polarization control of terahertz waves generated from two-color laser-induced gas plasma,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 103(2), 023001 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

In this paper, we extend the 2-D plasma current model to examine full parameters controlling THz yields and polarization, ultimately finding the conditions for optimized THz generation. We also examine the 2-D model by comparing our experimental results with simulations.

2. Two dimensional (2-D) photocurrent model and simulation

We consider a 2-D photocurrent model by taking into account of transverse 2-D laser fields as shown in Fig. 1(b). When the fundamental laser pulse passes through a birefringent BBO crystal, its amplitude can be decomposed into two orthogonal waves, Eωo and Eωe, polarized along the ordinary (ô) and extraordinary (ê) axes of the crystal, respectively. Here the second harmonic pulse produced by type-I phase matching is polarized along the ê axis.

Overall, they are given by
Eωo=Eωsin(α),Eωe=Eωcos(α),E2ω=deff(Eω)2sin2(α),
(1)
where Eω and E are the amplitudes of the fundamental (ω) and the second harmonic (2ω) fields, deff is the effective conversion coefficient of the BBO crystal from ω to 2ω, and α is the angle between the incoming ω polarization (horizontal axis) and the ê axis [see Fig. 1(b)]. Then the laser field at the focal plane is expressed as
EL=Eωecos(ωt)e^+Eωocos(ωt+φ)o^+E2ωcos(2ωt+θ)e^,
(2)
With
ϕ=ω(nωenωo)l/c,θ=ω(nωn2ω)d/c+θ0,
(3)
where φ is the phase retardation between Eωe(t) and Eωo(t) after propagation through the BBO crystal of thickness l, nωo and nωe is the refractive index of the BBO crystal along the ô and ê axis, respectively. Also, θ is the relative phase between Eωe(t) and E(t), c is the speed of light in vacuum, d is the distance between plasma and BBO crystal, nω and n2ω is the refractive index of air at ω and 2ω frequency, respectively, and θ0 is the phase difference right after the BBO crystal. In practice, θ can be varied by changing d [7

7. K. Y. Kim, J. H. Glownia, A. J. Taylor, and G. Rodriguez, “Terahertz emission from ultrafast ionizing air in symmetry-broken laser fields,” Opt. Express 15(8), 4577–4584 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], and φ can be controlled by tilting the BBO crystal and thus varying the effective thickness of the crystal l (see Sec. 3 for details).

From the 2-D laser field in Eq. (2), one can calculate the tunneling ionization rate [18

18. L. D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Quantum Mechanics, (Elsevier Science, 1977).

] given by
w(t)=4ωa(EaEL(t))exp(23EaEL(t)),
(4)
where EL(t) = |EL| is the laser field amplitude, Ea = 5.14 × 109 V/cm is the atomic field, and ωa = 4.134 × 1016 s−1 is the atomic frequency. In practice, we used the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (ADK) tunneling ionization rate [19

19. M. V. Ammosov, N. B. Delone, and V. P. Krainov, “Tunnel ionization of complex atoms and of atomic ions in an alternating electromagnetic field,” Sov. Phys. JETP 64, 1191–1194 (1986).

]. Although the ADK model has been used for primarily for noble gases, it also works well for structureless atomic-like molecules such as neutral N2 (the primary constituent gas of atmospheric air). From the ionization rate equation, the time-varying electron density Ne(t) can be computed with multiple degrees of ionization taken into account [9

9. K. Y. Kim, “Generation of coherent terahertz radiation in ultrafast laser-gas interactions,” Phys. Plasmas 16(5), 056706 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. Here, we ignore collisional ionization, plasma recombination, and electron attachment to neutral molecules because those events occur much slowly [20

20. G. Rodriguez, A. R. Valenzuela, B. Yellampalle, M. J. Schmitt, and K.-Y. Kim, “In-line holographic imaging and electron density extraction of ultrafast ionized air filaments,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25(12), 1988–1997 (2008). [CrossRef]

] compared to the pulse duration <50 fs considered here.

Once the electron density is determined, the plasma current density can be obtained as
J(t)=ev(t,t)dNe(t)andv(t)=(e/me)ttEL(t)dt
(5)
where dNe(t′) is the change of electron density in the interval between t′ and t′ + dt′, and ve(t, t′) is the velocity of those electrons at t. Here, we need to consider 2-D transverse current density given by J = Joô + Jeê, where Jo and Je is the current density component directed along the ô and ê axis, respectively. The current surge radiates an electromagnetic field, given by ETHzdJ(t)/dt. Here, the two orthogonal current densities (Jo and Je) are always in phase as long as θ and φ do not change over the entire pulse duration, and this makes the far-field THz radiation linearly polarized. Here, the THz polarization angle is determined by the relative strength between Jo and Je.

We have examined the 2-D electron current density squared, |J|2 (or equivalently THz yield or intensity), by varying all three parameters (φ, θ, and α). Figure 3
Fig. 3 (Top) Resulting |J|2 (or THz yields) as a function of θ and α (degrees) for four different φ = 0°, 45°, 90°, and 210°. (Bottom) In each 2-D simulation, the line which yields the local |J|2 maximum at a fixed θ is selected and plotted as a function of α for |Jo|2 (line with circles), |Je|2 (line with asterisks), and |J|2 (solid line).
(top) shows |J|2 as a function of θ and α for four φ values (φ = 0°, 45°, 90°, and 210°). For each 2-D plot |J|2 (α, θ), the line which has a local maximum is selected and plotted as a function of α for |Jo|2, |Je|2, and |J|2 (bottom). The maximum THz yield occurs at φ = 210°, θ = 20°, and α = 55°. Here, we note that maximal THz does not occur at θ = 90° anymore because of 2-D plasma currents. In the case of φ = 210°, the THz polarization angle is ~60° with respect to the ê axis as shown in Fig. 2(b). With φ = 90°, the fundamental field Eω is circularly polarized and the resulting THz field is purely polarized along the ê axis [see Fig. 3 (bottom, third column)].

3. Experiments and simulations

The experimental setup is shown in Fig. 5
Fig. 5 Schematic setup for THz generation and detection. The far-field THz yield and polarization is measured with a pyroelectric detector combined with a wire-grid polarizer and filters (Teflon, HDPE, Sapphire, or Ge). THz output is controlled by varying the distant from BBO to filament (d), azimuthal angle of BBO (α), tilt angle of BBO (β), and tit angle of lens (γ).
. A Ti:sapphire laser system delivering 800 nm, ~6 mJ, 25 fs pulses at a 1 kHz repetition rate is used to generate THz radiation. The laser pulses are focused by a 250 mm lens and propagate through a 0.1-mm thick BBO crystal (type-I) which generates second harmonics. The fundamental and second harmonic pulses co-propagate and ionize atmospheric air at the focus, generating THz radiation. The optical pulses are blocked by a 5-mm thick silicon (Si) wafer, whereas the THz radiation produced at the focal spot is collected and focused into a pyroelectric detector (SPI-A-62THZ, Spectrum detector Inc.). For low (<3 THz) and high (<10 THz) frequency THz detection, an additional 1.5-mm thick Teflon, 1.5-mm thick high-density polyethylene (HDPE), 2-mm thick Sapphire, or 2-mm thick Ge filter is placed, in front of the detector. For low-frequency (<3 THz) THz polarization detection, an optional wire-grid polarizer (G50x20, Microtech instruments, contrast >95:2 below 3 THz) with 50 µm wire spacing and 20 µm wire diameter is placed in front of the pyroelectric detector.

We control the relative amplitude, Eωe/E2ω, by azimuthally rotating the BBO angle α, relative phase θ by moving the BBO position d, and phase retardation φ by tilting the BBO angle β [see Eq. (3)]. Furthermore, we change the filament length by tilting the focusing lens angle γ (see Fig. 5).

3.1 Relative phase (θ or d) effect on THz yields

3.2 Azimuth (α) and tilt (β) angle effects on THz yields and polarization

The azimuth α and tilt β angles of BBO crystal also affects THz output yield and polarization. To quantify those effects, THz yields are measured with varying α and β.

Figure 7(a)
Fig. 7 (a) THz yields as a function of α angle at β = 0° (black line with + ) and β = 1° (dashed red line). Co-plotted is the second harmonic intensity (blue line). (b-c) Fundamental (ω, red line), second harmonic (2ω, blue line with + ), and THz (black line with circles) polarization maps obtained with rotating the polarization analyzer at β = 0° and 1°. Unlike 2ω, ω polarization is dependent on the tilt angle β.
shows the THz yield as a function of α at two tilt angles β = 0° (black line with + ) and β = 1° (dashed red line). It shows that β = 1° provides the higher signal (60% more), which suggests that one needs to optimize φ, or practically β, to maximize the THz output. Here, we estimate φ to be 268° and 210° at β = 0° and 1°, respectively, in our BBO crystal case. In Fig. 7(a), co-plotted is the second harmonic intensity (blue line) with varying α. It is linearly polarized along the ê axis and peaked at α = 90°. By contrast, the THz yield is maximal at α = 55°, consistent with the 2-D photocurrent simulation [13

13. H. Wen and A. M. Lindenberg, “Coherent Terahertz polarization control through manipulation of Electron trajectories,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 103(2), 023902 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. At β = 0° and 1°, the corresponding THz polarization (black line with circles) measured with the wire grid analyzer is plotted in (b) and (c), respectively. Here, α = 55° is selected. Coplotted in Figs. 7(b-c) are the fundamental and second harmonic polarizations.

Figure 8
Fig. 8 Simulated φ value (blue line) as a function of (a) the BBO effective thickness in μm and (b) β in degrees. Co-plotted in (b) is the second harmonic intensity (green dashed line) produced by type-I phase-matching as a function of β. At β = 1°, φ ~220°.
shows how φ changes with the effective BBO thickness l or β under our experimental condition. In general, controlling φ by titling the BBO angle (β) is practically limited as it simultaneously affects the phase-matching condition in second harmonic generation. For example, Fig. 8(b) shows the second harmonic intensity (green line) as a function of β. If β deviates more than ± 2°, the second harmonic conversion efficiency drops significantly, ultimately reducing THz output power. This limits the achievable φ value as π < φ < 2π (or equivalently 0 < φ < π), which is just good for a full control of φ but this naturally drops the THz output energy when the optimal β approaches ± 2°. This, however, can be overcome, if an optical waveplate is inserted just before the BBO crystal and adjusted to control the tilt angle β separately. In addition, Fig. 8(b) shows the initial value of φ is ~268° at β = 0° but it drops to φ = 220° at β = 1°, which is near the optimal condition φ = 210° obtained in the 2-D simulation.

3.3 Plasma filament length effect on THz yields

The 2-D plasma current model described in Sec. 2 predicts linear THz polarization, but circular or elliptically polarized THz radiation is often observed experimentally. For instance, the polarization map shown in Fig. 7(c) indicates the THz wave is not perfectly linearly polarized but rather elliptically polarized. We believe this occurs because the transverse plasma current (thus THz polarization) direction gradually rotates with varying θ along the plasma filament (recall θ varies with d). Thus, the THz pulse produced at each point along the filament has different linear polarization and arrives at different times on the detection plane. Because the THz velocity is faster than the optical group velocity, the THz pulse produced at the entrance of filament arrives earlier than that produced at the end of filament [21

21. X. Lu and X.-C. Zhang, “Generation of Elliptically Polarized Terahertz Waves from Laser-Induced Plasma with Double Helix Electrodes,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 108(12), 123903 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. In addition, there is an instantaneous cross Kerr effect between ω and 2ω pulses occurring along the filament, which also rotates the plasma current and THz radiation direction. These two effects can produce elliptically or circularly THz polarization. More details about this macroscopic propagation effect will be reported separately. Here, instead we study the total THz yield dependence on the filament length.

Figure 9
Fig. 9 THz emission as a function of the BBO-to-plasma distance d with three different plasma lengths, 12 mm (line with + ), 14 mm (line with circles), and 16 mm (line with squares) with (a) the Ge filter for high frequency (<10 THz) detection and (b) the Teflon filter for low frequency (0.1 ~3 THz) detection.
shows the total THz yield with increasing d for three different plasma lengths, 12 mm, 14 mm, and 16 mm with two different filter sets: (a) Ge (<10 THz) and (b) Teflon (0.1~3 THz) [22

22. Y. S. Lee, Principles of Terahertz Science and Technology (Springer, New York, 2008).

,23

23. S. G. Ganichev and W. Prettl, Intense Terahertz Excitation of Semiconductors (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2006).

]. Here, the filament length is adjusted by titling the lens normal angle as shown in Fig. 5. At both high and low THz frequencies, the longer the filament is, the more intense THz generation is produced as shown in Figs. 9(a)(b). This implies that tilt-induced aberration possibly drops the laser intensity in the transverse direction, but its effect looks less significant compared to the plasma volume (length) effect on THz generation. Here, the maximum enhancement factor is ~2.8 for the high THz frequency case. However, in the low THz case, the enhancement factor is ~1.4, and the yield even drops when the filament length reaches ~16 mm [Fig. 9(b)]. This is attributed to THz absorption in the plasma filament. It was previously shown that low frequency THz components start to saturate earlier than the higher frequency components [8

8. K. Y. Kim, A. J. Taylor, J. H. Glownia, and G. Rodriguez, “Coherent control of terahertz supercontinuum generation in ultrafast laser-gas interactions,” Nat. Photonics 2(10), 605–609 (2008). [CrossRef]

]. We also note that the θ dependence is more dramatic with the low THz frequency case. We speculate that this may be attributed to certain effects which are not included in our model. For simplicity, we ignore collective plasma oscillations, electron-ion and electron-neutral collisional effects, rescattering with parent ions, and any propagation effects [24

24. K. Y. Kim, J. H. Glownia, A. J. Taylor, and G. Rodriguez, “High-power broadband terahertz generation via two-color photoionization in gases,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 48(6), 797–805 (2012). [CrossRef]

] including self- and cross-phase modulations, spectral shifting and broadening, Kerr-induced polarization rotation, phase- and group velocity walk-offs between two-color fields. In particular, plasma oscillations and collisional effects greatly influence the low frequency components of THz radiation initially produced by the plasma currents [25

25. V. B. Gildenburg and N. V. Vvedenskii, “Optical-to-THz wave conversion via excitation of plasma oscillations in the tunneling-ionization process,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 98(24), 245002 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

4. Conclusion

We describe the mechanism of 2-D plasma current generation and optimization of the magnitude and polarization of THz radiation in two-color photoionization. This is done by controlling the relative phase θ, BBO azimuth angle α, and tilt angle β. We show that these parameters can control many laser-THz properties including laser (ω and 2ω) amplitudes, ellipticity of ω, phase retardation φ, phase delay θ, polarization and the intensity of THz, all consistent with our 2-D photocurrent model. Furthermore, we have measured the THz yield dependence on the filament length. All these results have verified the sensitivity of control parameters in generating intense THz radiation and will be guiding factors for further investigation. For a more general characterization of THz radiation, however, our semiclassical approach needs to be replaced by full quantum mechanical calculations, in particular when the quasi-static tunneling ionization regime becomes inapplicable [26

26. A. A. Silaev and N. V. Vvedenskii, “Residual-current excitation in plasmas produced by few-cycle laser pulses,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 102(11), 115005 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

Acknowledgments

References and links

1.

D. J. Cook and R. M. Hochstrasser, “Intense terahertz pulses by four-wave rectification in air,” Opt. Lett. 25(16), 1210–1212 (2000). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

2.

M. Kress, T. Löffler, S. Eden, M. Thomson, and H. G. Roskos, “Terahertz-pulse generation by photoionization of air with laser pulses composed of both fundamental and second-harmonic waves,” Opt. Lett. 29(10), 1120–1122 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

T. Bartel, P. Gaal, K. Reimann, M. Woerner, and T. Elsaesser, “Generation of single-cycle THz transients with high electric-field amplitudes,” Opt. Lett. 30(20), 2805–2807 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

M. Kreß, T. Löffler, M. D. Thomson, R. Dörner, H. Gimpel, K. Zrost, T. Ergler, R. Moshammer, U. Morgner, J. Ullrich, and H. G. Roskos, “Determination of the carrier-envelope phase of few-cycle laser pulses with terahertzemission spectroscopy,” Nat. Phys. 2(5), 327–331 (2006). [CrossRef]

5.

X. Xie, J. Dai, and X.-C. Zhang, “Coherent control of THz wave generation in ambient air,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 96(7), 075005 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

H. G. Roskos, M. D. Thomson, M. Kreß, and T. Löffler, “Broadband THz emission from gas plasmas induced by femtosecond optical pulses: From fundamentals to applications,” Laser Photonics Rev. 1(4), 349–368 (2007). [CrossRef]

7.

K. Y. Kim, J. H. Glownia, A. J. Taylor, and G. Rodriguez, “Terahertz emission from ultrafast ionizing air in symmetry-broken laser fields,” Opt. Express 15(8), 4577–4584 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

K. Y. Kim, A. J. Taylor, J. H. Glownia, and G. Rodriguez, “Coherent control of terahertz supercontinuum generation in ultrafast laser-gas interactions,” Nat. Photonics 2(10), 605–609 (2008). [CrossRef]

9.

K. Y. Kim, “Generation of coherent terahertz radiation in ultrafast laser-gas interactions,” Phys. Plasmas 16(5), 056706 (2009). [CrossRef]

10.

F. Blanchard, G. Sharma, X. Ropagnol, L. Razzari, R. Morandotti, and T. Ozaki, “Improved terahertz two-color plasma sources pumped by high intensity laser beam,” Opt. Express 17(8), 6044–6052 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

W.-M. Wang, Z.-M. Sheng, H.-C. Wu, M. Chen, C. Li, J. Zhang, and K. Mima, “Strong terahertz pulse generation by chirped laser pulses in tenuous gases,” Opt. Express 16(21), 16999–17006 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

A. Houard, Y. Liu, B. Prade, and A. Mysyrowicz, “Polarization analysis of terahertz radiation generated by four-wave mixing in air,” Opt. Lett. 33(11), 1195–1197 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

H. Wen and A. M. Lindenberg, “Coherent Terahertz polarization control through manipulation of Electron trajectories,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 103(2), 023902 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

J. Dai, N. Karpowicz, and X.-C. Zhang, “Coherent polarization control of terahertz waves generated from two-color laser-induced gas plasma,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 103(2), 023001 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

15.

T.-J. Wang, Y. Chen, C. Marceau, F. Theberge, M. Chateauneuf, J. Dubois, and S. L. Chin, “High energy terahertz emission from two-color laser-induced filamentation in air with pump pulse duration control,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 1311081/1-3 (2009).

16.

Y.-Z. Zhang, Y. Chen, S.-Q. Xu, H. Lian, M. Wang, W. Liu, S. L. Chin, and G. Mu, “Portraying polarization state of terahertz pulse generated by a two-color laser field in air,” Opt. Lett. 34(18), 2841–2843 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

17.

J. Dai, B. Clough, I.-C. Ho, X. Lu, J. Liu, and X.-C. Zhang, “Recent Progresses in Terahertz Wave Air Photonics,” IEEE Trans. THz Sci. Tech. (Paris) 1(1), 274–281 (2011). [CrossRef]

18.

L. D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Quantum Mechanics, (Elsevier Science, 1977).

19.

M. V. Ammosov, N. B. Delone, and V. P. Krainov, “Tunnel ionization of complex atoms and of atomic ions in an alternating electromagnetic field,” Sov. Phys. JETP 64, 1191–1194 (1986).

20.

G. Rodriguez, A. R. Valenzuela, B. Yellampalle, M. J. Schmitt, and K.-Y. Kim, “In-line holographic imaging and electron density extraction of ultrafast ionized air filaments,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25(12), 1988–1997 (2008). [CrossRef]

21.

X. Lu and X.-C. Zhang, “Generation of Elliptically Polarized Terahertz Waves from Laser-Induced Plasma with Double Helix Electrodes,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 108(12), 123903 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

22.

Y. S. Lee, Principles of Terahertz Science and Technology (Springer, New York, 2008).

23.

S. G. Ganichev and W. Prettl, Intense Terahertz Excitation of Semiconductors (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2006).

24.

K. Y. Kim, J. H. Glownia, A. J. Taylor, and G. Rodriguez, “High-power broadband terahertz generation via two-color photoionization in gases,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 48(6), 797–805 (2012). [CrossRef]

25.

V. B. Gildenburg and N. V. Vvedenskii, “Optical-to-THz wave conversion via excitation of plasma oscillations in the tunneling-ionization process,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 98(24), 245002 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

26.

A. A. Silaev and N. V. Vvedenskii, “Residual-current excitation in plasmas produced by few-cycle laser pulses,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 102(11), 115005 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

OCIS Codes
(260.5210) Physical optics : Photoionization
(320.7120) Ultrafast optics : Ultrafast phenomena
(350.5400) Other areas of optics : Plasmas
(040.2235) Detectors : Far infrared or terahertz

ToC Category:
Ultrafast Optics

History
Original Manuscript: May 17, 2012
Revised Manuscript: July 17, 2012
Manuscript Accepted: August 6, 2012
Published: August 14, 2012

Citation
T. I. Oh, Y. S. You, and K. Y. Kim, "Two-dimensional plasma current and optimized terahertz generation in two-color photoionization," Opt. Express 20, 19778-19786 (2012)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-20-18-19778


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. D. J. Cook and R. M. Hochstrasser, “Intense terahertz pulses by four-wave rectification in air,” Opt. Lett. 25(16), 1210–1212 (2000). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. M. Kress, T. Löffler, S. Eden, M. Thomson, and H. G. Roskos, “Terahertz-pulse generation by photoionization of air with laser pulses composed of both fundamental and second-harmonic waves,” Opt. Lett. 29(10), 1120–1122 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. T. Bartel, P. Gaal, K. Reimann, M. Woerner, and T. Elsaesser, “Generation of single-cycle THz transients with high electric-field amplitudes,” Opt. Lett. 30(20), 2805–2807 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. M. Kreß, T. Löffler, M. D. Thomson, R. Dörner, H. Gimpel, K. Zrost, T. Ergler, R. Moshammer, U. Morgner, J. Ullrich, and H. G. Roskos, “Determination of the carrier-envelope phase of few-cycle laser pulses with terahertzemission spectroscopy,” Nat. Phys. 2(5), 327–331 (2006). [CrossRef]
  5. X. Xie, J. Dai, and X.-C. Zhang, “Coherent control of THz wave generation in ambient air,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 96(7), 075005 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. H. G. Roskos, M. D. Thomson, M. Kreß, and T. Löffler, “Broadband THz emission from gas plasmas induced by femtosecond optical pulses: From fundamentals to applications,” Laser Photonics Rev. 1(4), 349–368 (2007). [CrossRef]
  7. K. Y. Kim, J. H. Glownia, A. J. Taylor, and G. Rodriguez, “Terahertz emission from ultrafast ionizing air in symmetry-broken laser fields,” Opt. Express 15(8), 4577–4584 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  8. K. Y. Kim, A. J. Taylor, J. H. Glownia, and G. Rodriguez, “Coherent control of terahertz supercontinuum generation in ultrafast laser-gas interactions,” Nat. Photonics 2(10), 605–609 (2008). [CrossRef]
  9. K. Y. Kim, “Generation of coherent terahertz radiation in ultrafast laser-gas interactions,” Phys. Plasmas 16(5), 056706 (2009). [CrossRef]
  10. F. Blanchard, G. Sharma, X. Ropagnol, L. Razzari, R. Morandotti, and T. Ozaki, “Improved terahertz two-color plasma sources pumped by high intensity laser beam,” Opt. Express 17(8), 6044–6052 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. W.-M. Wang, Z.-M. Sheng, H.-C. Wu, M. Chen, C. Li, J. Zhang, and K. Mima, “Strong terahertz pulse generation by chirped laser pulses in tenuous gases,” Opt. Express 16(21), 16999–17006 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  12. A. Houard, Y. Liu, B. Prade, and A. Mysyrowicz, “Polarization analysis of terahertz radiation generated by four-wave mixing in air,” Opt. Lett. 33(11), 1195–1197 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. H. Wen and A. M. Lindenberg, “Coherent Terahertz polarization control through manipulation of Electron trajectories,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 103(2), 023902 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  14. J. Dai, N. Karpowicz, and X.-C. Zhang, “Coherent polarization control of terahertz waves generated from two-color laser-induced gas plasma,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 103(2), 023001 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  15. T.-J. Wang, Y. Chen, C. Marceau, F. Theberge, M. Chateauneuf, J. Dubois, and S. L. Chin, “High energy terahertz emission from two-color laser-induced filamentation in air with pump pulse duration control,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 1311081/1-3 (2009).
  16. Y.-Z. Zhang, Y. Chen, S.-Q. Xu, H. Lian, M. Wang, W. Liu, S. L. Chin, and G. Mu, “Portraying polarization state of terahertz pulse generated by a two-color laser field in air,” Opt. Lett. 34(18), 2841–2843 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  17. J. Dai, B. Clough, I.-C. Ho, X. Lu, J. Liu, and X.-C. Zhang, “Recent Progresses in Terahertz Wave Air Photonics,” IEEE Trans. THz Sci. Tech. (Paris) 1(1), 274–281 (2011). [CrossRef]
  18. L. D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Quantum Mechanics, (Elsevier Science, 1977).
  19. M. V. Ammosov, N. B. Delone, and V. P. Krainov, “Tunnel ionization of complex atoms and of atomic ions in an alternating electromagnetic field,” Sov. Phys. JETP 64, 1191–1194 (1986).
  20. G. Rodriguez, A. R. Valenzuela, B. Yellampalle, M. J. Schmitt, and K.-Y. Kim, “In-line holographic imaging and electron density extraction of ultrafast ionized air filaments,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25(12), 1988–1997 (2008). [CrossRef]
  21. X. Lu and X.-C. Zhang, “Generation of Elliptically Polarized Terahertz Waves from Laser-Induced Plasma with Double Helix Electrodes,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 108(12), 123903 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  22. Y. S. Lee, Principles of Terahertz Science and Technology (Springer, New York, 2008).
  23. S. G. Ganichev and W. Prettl, Intense Terahertz Excitation of Semiconductors (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2006).
  24. K. Y. Kim, J. H. Glownia, A. J. Taylor, and G. Rodriguez, “High-power broadband terahertz generation via two-color photoionization in gases,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 48(6), 797–805 (2012). [CrossRef]
  25. V. B. Gildenburg and N. V. Vvedenskii, “Optical-to-THz wave conversion via excitation of plasma oscillations in the tunneling-ionization process,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 98(24), 245002 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  26. A. A. Silaev and N. V. Vvedenskii, “Residual-current excitation in plasmas produced by few-cycle laser pulses,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 102(11), 115005 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.


« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited