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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 20, Iss. 19 — Sep. 10, 2012
  • pp: 20863–20873
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Method of compensating for pixel migration in volume holographic optical disc (VHOD)

Yeh-Wei Yu, Chih-Yuan Cheng, Tun-Chien Teng, Cheng-Hsien Chen, Shiuan-Huei Lin, Bo-Rong Wu, Che-Chih Hsu, Yi-Jiun Chen, Xuan-Hao Lee, Chi-Yu Wu, and Ching-Cherng Sun  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 20, Issue 19, pp. 20863-20873 (2012)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.20.020863


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Abstract

Volume holographic optical disc (VHOD) technology is simpler than the angular multiplexing holographic system. However, disc rotation usually causes pixel migration, thus reducing signal quality. This study proposes a special geometrical arrangement to counteract pixel migration. Using paraxial approximation analysis, an optimal geometrical distance ratio, K, is calculated to compensate for pixel migration and improve image quality during disc rotation. The results of approximation analysis are confirmed by both simulation and experimental results.

© 2012 OSA

1. Introduction

Library-style tape storage systems have been used for archive [6

6. IBM, “Tape storage systems,” http://www-03.ibm.com/systems/storage/tape/.

]. However, the serial access of this method makes it too inefficient for many modern applications. On the other hand, the hard disk archive consuming too much electrical energy becomes heavy loading of big company. The best modern alternative is the volume holography storage system, which has a theoretical storage capacity as high as V/λ3, with V being the recording volume and λ the wavelength of the recording light source [7

7. P. J. van Heerden, “Theory of optical information storage in solids,” Appl. Opt. 2(4), 393 (1963). [CrossRef]

]. The capacity of a volume holographic storage system is reported to be as high as 100 bits/μm2 [8

8. A. Pu and D. Psaltis, “Holographic data storage with 100 bits/μm2 density,” Optical Data Storage Topical Meeting Conference Digest, 48–49 (1997).

, 9

9. G. W. Burr, C. M. Jefferson, H. Coufal, C. Gollasch, M. Jurich, J. A. Hoffnagle, R. Macfarlane, and R. M. Shelby, “Volume holographic data storage at an areal density of 100 Gbit/in2,” Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, 188–189 (2000).

]. Its densities are greater than those of even the latest 32 nm process dynamic random access memory (DRAM) [10

10. N. Butt, K. Mcstay, A. Cestero, H. Ho, W. Kong, S. Fang, R. Krishnan, B. Khan, A. Tessier, W. Davies, S. Lee, Y. Zhang, J. Johnson, S. Rombawa, R. Takalkar, A. Blauberg, K. V. Hawkins, J. Liu, S. Rosenblatt, P. Goyal, S. Gupta, J. Ervin, Z. Li, S. Galis, J. Barth, M. Yin, T. Weaver, J. H. Li, S. Narasimha, P. Parries, W. K. Henson, N. Robson, T. Kirihata, M. Chudzik, E. Maciejewski, P. Agnello, S. Stiffler, and S. S. Iyer, “A 0.039 μm2 High Performance eDRAM Cell based on 32nm High-K/Metal SOI Technology,” IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting, 27.5.1 – 27.5.4 (2010).

], and because two-dimensional data arrays are recorded and retrieved at the speed of light, the page-based technique can transfer data at rates measured in GB/s [11

11. L. Hesselink, S. Orlov, and M. Bashaw, “Holographic data storage systems,” Proc. IEEE 92(8), 1231–1280 (2004). [CrossRef]

]. Furthermore, multiphoton photorefractive processes and photorefractive polymers promise the rewritable-applications in the future [12

12. J. J. Amodei and D. L. Staebler, “Holographic pattern fixing in electro-optic crystals,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 18(12), 540–542 (1971). [CrossRef]

18

18. S. Tay, P.-A. Blanche, R. Voorakaranam, A. V. Tunç, W. Lin, S. Rokutanda, T. Gu, D. Flores, P. Wang, G. Li, P. St Hilaire, J. Thomas, R. A. Norwood, M. Yamamoto, and N. Peyghambarian, “An updatable holographic three-dimensional display,” Nature 451(7179), 694–698 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

The angular multiplexing holographic storage systems available commercially have high storage capacities and high transfer rates [19

19. K. Curtis, L. Dhar, A. Hill, W. Wilson, and M. Ayres, Holographic Data Storage: From Theory to Practical Systems (Wiley, 2010).

], but their mechanisms are intrinsically complex. Conversely, the shifting multiplexing of the spherical reference light in the so-called volume holographic optical disc (VHOD) system requires only that the disc be rotated [20

20. G. Barbastathis, M. Levene, and D. Psaltis, “Shift multiplexing with spherical reference waves,” Appl. Opt. 35(14), 2403–2417 (1996). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 21

21. H. Y. S. Li and D. Psaltis, “Three-dimensional holographic disks,” Appl. Opt. 33(17), 3764–3774 (1994). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], simplifying and further compacting the mechanism. Nonetheless, two factors limit the application of VHOD. First, radial oriented inter-page cross-talk caused by Bragg degeneracy limits storage capacity (although this problem has recently been shown to be mitigated by introducing a spatial filter in the reference beam [22

22. T. C. Teng, Y. W. Yu, and C. C. Sun, “Enlarging multiplexing capacity with reduced radial cross talk in volume holographic discs,” Opt. Express 14(8), 3187–3192 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]). Second, the readout signal of the VHOD shifts when the disc rotates, resulting in extra inter-pixel crosstalk that decreases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This study proposes a method for addressing these problems.

2. Theory

Figure 1
Fig. 1 Schematic outline of VHOD. (a) Writing process. (b) Reading process.
shows the structure of the VHOD system. During the writing process, the signal beam consists of a convergent spherical wave that illuminates the spatial light modulator (SLM) and focuses on the disc. The interference between a divergent spherical reference (R) and the signal beam (S) is recorded. In the readout process, the conjugation of the reference (R*) serves as the reading light incident on the disc. Thus, the conjugation of the signal (S*) is diffracted and imaged on the CCD. Although simpler than traditional shifting multiplexing, by retaining the spherical-wave reference beam and recording the Fourier spectrum of the signal as before, VHOD suffers from the same problems of limited storage capacity and decreased SNR. Figure 2
Fig. 2 Contrast enhanced image captured by the CCD in the reading process (Media 1).
(Media 1) shows a contrast enhanced image captured by the CCD in the reading process. The shift of the disc not only causes a corresponding shift of the diffracting signal, thus degrading the captured signal, but also leads to critical deviation tolerance. To solve the problem of pixel migration, we start from the theoretical model based on the VOHIL model and Fresnel diffraction [23

23. J. W. Goodman, Introduction to Fourier Optics (McGraw-Hill, 2002).

, 24

24. C. C. Sun, “Simplified model for diffraction analysis of volume holograms,” Opt. Eng. 42(5), 1184–1185 (2003). [CrossRef]

]. A schematic diagram of VHOD is shown in Fig. 3
Fig. 3 Schematic diagram of VHOD. (a) Writing process. (b) Reading process.
.

The reference distribution in the disc is a divergent spherical wave. By paraxial approximation and coordinate rotation, the reference can be expressed as
Rm(xm,ym,zm)=1rexp{ik(xm2cos2θ+zm2sin2θxmzmsin2θ+ym22r+r)},
(1)
where (xm, ym, zm) is the coordinate attached on the disc, k is the wave number, θ is the incident angle of the reference beam, and r is the distance from a given position inside the disc to the focus plane of the reference. The derivation of r is as follows:
r=r0+xmsinθ+zmcosθ,
(2)
where r0 is the distance between the disc and the point source of the reference beam. The signal distribution inside the recording disc is
Sm(xm,ym,zm)=exp(ik(z0+zm))iλ(z0+zm)exp(iπxm2+ym2λ(z0+zm))S0(xs,ys)exp(iπxs2+ys22xsxm2ysymλ(z0+zm))dxsdys.
(3)
where S0 is the field distribution after modulation of the focusing signal beam by SLM, (xs, ys) are the coordinates attached on the SLM or CCD, z0 is the distance between the disc and the SLM, and λ is the wave length.

The interfering fringe of the signal and the reference is
Gm=|Rm|2+|Sm|2+Rm*Sm+Sm*Rm,
(4)
Because the probing beam is the phase conjugation of the reference, only the last term is retrieved by the system, and we only consider
Gm=Sm*Rm.
(5)
The phase conjugation of the reference reads the grating when the disc shifts (Δx, Δy), and the amplitude of the signal diffracting from each position inside the disc is
Dm(xm,ym,zm)=circ(xm2+ym2w)Rm*(xm,ym,zm)Gm(xmΔx,ymΔy,zm),
(6)
where circ(xm2+ym2w) stands for the system pupil with radius w. The amplitude of the diffracting signal propagating to the CCD is calculated by the Fresnel diffraction.
Ds(xs,ys,zm)=exp(iπ(xs2+ys2)λ(z0+zm))Dm(xs,ys,zm)exp(iπxm2+ym22xsxm2ysymλ(z0+zm))dxmdym,
(7)
To obtain an analytical solution, we use the property
r0>>xmsinθ.
(8)
The parameter r approximates as follows:
rr0+zmcosθ.
(9)
Therefore, we obtain the amplitude of the diffractive signal from depth zm, as follows:
Ds(xs,ys,zm)=F(SpPSFDelta),
(10)
where
F(xs,ys,zm)=exp(iπλ(xs2+ys2Δx2Δy2z0+zm+Δx2cos2θ+Δy2+Δxzmsin2θr0+zmcosθ2Δxsinθ)),
(11)
Sp(xs,ys,zm)=S0*(xs,ys)exp(iπxs2+ys2+2Δxxs+2Δyysλ(z0+zm)),
(12)
PSF(xs,ys,zm)=λ(z0+zm)J1(2πwxs2+ys2λ(z0+zm))πwxs2+ys2,
(13)
and
Delta(xs,ys,zm)=δ(xsΔx(1(z0+zm)cos2θr0+zmcosθ),ysΔy(1(z0+zm)r0+zmcosθ)).
(14)
Each function has a unique physical property. The F function is a phase distribution; the Sp function is the mathematical product of a signal distribution and a phase distribution; PSF is a point spread function caused by the system pupil; and the Delta function describes the shift of the diffracting pattern. The Delta function is the key factor in the present analysis. When the disc rotates, the tangential shift (Δx) is greater than the radial shift (Δy). Therefore, if
r0z0=cos2θ,
(15)
Δx is multiplied by a number approaching zero in Eq. (14). In other words, the shift of the disc causes the smallest possible shift of the diffracting pattern. We use K to mean r0/z0:

K=r0z0.
(16)

Described in physical terms, the solution of pixel migration is effectuated through displacement compensation. When the disc shifts, there is a corresponding positive shift of the recording position and a corresponding negative shift of the diffracting image. When the distance ratio equals cos2θ, the positive and negative shifts compensate for each other. Thus, the pixel migration is resolved.

3. Simulation

Using Eq. (7), a simulation can be conducted based on the Fresnel diffraction and the VOHIL theorem (the approximation in Eq. (9) is not used). By integrating Ds along depth zm, we obtain the intensity distribution in the CCD plane.
ICCD(xs,ys)=|-T2T2Ds(xs,ys,zm)dzm|2.
(17)
In the simulation, the thickness of the disc is 1.8 mm and the refractive index is 1.5. The wavelength inside the disc is 0.532/1.5 μm. The effective incident angle of the reference is 15°. The effective distance, r0, is kept at 40 mm to keep the same shift selectivity. z0 is 20 mm for K = 2 and 42.9 mm for K = cos2θ. The signal in the SLM is 50 × 50 pixels with randomly distributed 0’s and 1’s. The pixel-number ratio between 0’s and 1’s is 1:1. The pixel size of
Fig. 4 Diffracted signal captured by the CCD. (a) K = 2 (Media 2). (b) K = cos2θ(Media 3). both the SLM and the CCD is 14 × 14 μm2. Figure 4(a) (Media 2) and Fig. 4 (b) (Media 3) show the diffracting signal captured by the CCD when K = 2 and K = cos2θ, respectively. As expected, the diffracting signal in Fig. 4(a) (Media 2) shifts, but that in Fig. 4 (b) (Media 3) remains steady. Figure 4 (b) (Media 3) consequently shows greater image quality when the disc rotates. The SNRs were calculated according to the following formula:
SNR=20log[(m1vth)σ1],
(18)
where m1 and m0 are the means of the distribution of 1’s and 0’s, respectively [25

25. G. P. Nordin and P. Asthana, “Effects of cross talk on fidelity in page-oriented volume holographic optical data storage,” Opt. Lett. 18(18), 1553–1555 (1993). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 26

26. Members of the Technical Staff, Bell Laboratories, Transmission Systems for Communications (Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, N.J., 1971), Chap. 30, p. 726.

]. σ1 and σ0 are the standard deviations of the distribution of 1’s and 0’s, respectively. vth is the threshold value between the 1’s and the 0’s, and is calculated as follows:
vth=σ1m0+σ0m1σ1+σ0,
(19)
Figure 5
Fig. 5 SNR of diffracting signal depending on disc rotation.
shows the SNR of the diffracting signal plotted against the disc rotation. The blue and red curves stand for K = 2 and K = cos2θ, respectively. With the disc in the initial position in the writing process, the blue curve is higher than the red curve because the smaller z0 yields a greater point spread function. However, as the disc falls out of precise alignment, the blue curve drops considerably faster than the red curve. In other words, pixel migration has been avoided at the price of a slight decrease in SNR.

4. Experiment

Figure 6
Fig. 6 The experimental setup.
shows the experimental apparatus used to demonstrate this technique. Its setup is the same as that shown in Fig. 1, except that an additional CCD B is used to capture diffracting signals (S). The light source is a Verdi-laser with a wavelength of 0.532 μm. The signal beam is a convergent spherical wave illuminating the SLM and focusing on the disc. The disc is positioned near the focus of the signal beam but deviates slightly from the focus depth to avoid a strong DC term.

The recording medium is a PQ/PMMA photopolymer 1.8 mm in thickness. The refractive index of the PQ/PMMA is 1.5. The signal beam normally strikes the disc with a distance of 6.8 cm between the SLM and the disc. Because of the refractive boundary, the effective distance inside the disc is 10.2 cm. The reference beam is a divergent spherical wave with an incident angle of 22.8°, which corresponds to 15° inside the disc. The distance from the divergent point of the reference to the recording region on the disc is 6.4 cm. From the geometric schematic diagram shown in Fig. 7
Fig. 7 Schematic diagram for position of effective light source.
, we obtain

rairsin(23.3)=rdisksin(15).
(20)

The resulting effective distance inside the disc (rdisc) is 9.5 cm. The K factor thus equals cos2θ and fits Eq. (15). In the readout process, the conjugation of the reference (R*) serves as the reading light. Thus, the conjugation of the signal (S*) is diffracted and imaged on CCD A. The contrast enhanced image in Fig. 8
Fig. 8 Contrast enhanced image captured by the CCD in the reading process (Media4).
(Media 4) shows that when the disc shifts, the diffracting image dims but remains in the same position. Compared to Fig. 2 (Media 1), the improvement is evident.

5. Application

Using an optimal value for K, the signal can be read even when the disc continues to rotate. In the simulation, we accumulated the signal with the disc rotating from 0 rad to 10−3 rad (Fig. 9
Fig. 9 Accumulated signal with disc rotating from 0 rad to 10−3 rad. (a) K = 2 (Media 5). (b) K = cos2θ (Media 6).
). Figure 9(a) (Media 5) and Fig. 9(b) (Media 6) show the accumulated signals when K = 2 and K = cos2θ, respectively, and show how the image quality in Fig. 9(b) (Media 6) remains relatively unchanged as the disc rotates. Figure 10
Fig. 10 SNR depending on disc rotation.
shows the SNR plotted against disc rotation. The horizontal axis is the accumulation distance, and the blue and red curves stand for K = 2 and K = cos2θ, respectively. Significantly, the red curve remains above 10 throughout the range of accumulated distance from 0 rad to 10−3 rad, reflecting the degree to which the data transfer rate is enhanced by the ability to read the signal while the disc is rotating.

6. Analysis for SLM with wide area

Equation (15) is derived out based on paraxial condition. Nevertheless, the system is composed of a SLM with wide area and a reference with a divergent beam. So, the geometric relationship described by Eq. (15) can’t be satisfied for signal in any position of the SLM. Here, we analyze the applicability of compensating pixel migration for signal in different locations. The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction theory is used in order to simulate light propagating at large angle [27

27. M. Born and E. Wolf, Principles of Optics, 6th ed. (Pergamon, New York, 1980), p. 382.

]. Figure 11
Fig. 11 Schematic diagram for (a) K = cos2θ and (b) K = 2.
shows the schematic diagram for both K = cos2θ and K = 2. The parameters are the same as other simulations in this paper except the dimension of the SLM. The width of SLM in x direction is 28mm, corresponding to 2000 pixel numbers. θs is the inclined angle of the light when it propagates from the signal to the focus point. The simulation results for SNR depending on disc rotation among different θs range are shown in Fig. 12
Fig. 12 SNR depending on disc rotation forθs in different range. (a) 0°<θs<1.9°. (b) 1.9°<θs <3.7°. (c) 3.7°<θs<5.6°. (d) 5.6°<θs<7.4°. (e) 7.4°<θs<9.3°. (f) 9.3°<θs<11.1°. (g) 11.1°<θs <12.9°. (h) 12.9°<θs<14.6°. (i) 11.1°<θs <12.9°. (j) 12.9°<θs<14.6°.
. In each case, 100 × 10 pixels are used as signal for K = cos2θ, and pixels inside the same range of θs are used as signal for K = 2. The simulation results show the SNR drops down for large θs. Even so, the performance for K = cos2θ is always better than K = 2.

7. Conclusion

VHOD storage is simpler and more compact than angular multiplexing holographic storage. However, disc rotation typically causes pixel migration and a consequent decline in signal quality. This study proposed a geometrical algorithm to avoid pixel migration during the reading process. By making a paraxial approximation of VHOD, a geometrical distance ratio, K, can be calculated. When K equals cos2θ, the system achieves displacement compensation, and the pixel migration is compensated for. This technique was demonstrated in a simulation video in which the SNR was used to assess diffracting signal quality. The video shows that with the disc in the initial writing position, there is no improvement at K = cos2θ because the relatively small z0 induces a greater point spread function. However, when the disc is not aligned precisely, the SNR for K = 2 drops substantially faster than that for K = cos2θ, indicating that the problem of pixel migration has been solved at the price of a slight decrease in SNR. An experiment to demonstrate the technique showed that when the disc shifted at K = cos2θ, the diffracting image dimmed but remained in the same position. Compared to the results obtained with K = 2, the progress is evident. Thus, the technique of reading signals during disc rotation enhances the data transfer rate significantly. In the end, we check the performance of the system for signal with large size by Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction theory. Although the simulation results show the SNR drops down for large θs, the performance for K = cos2θ is always better than K = 2.

Acknowledgment

References and links

1.

Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM), NEMA Standards Publications. http://medical.nema.org/.

2.

K. D. Foord, “PACS workstation respecification: display, data flow, system integration, and environmental issues, derived from analysis of the Conquest Hospital pre-DICOM PACS experience,” Eur. Radiol. 9(6), 1161–1169 (1999). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

J. Bernarding, A. Thiel, and A. Grzesik, “A JAVA-based DICOM server with integration of clinical findings and DICOM-conform data encryption,” Int. J. Med. Inform. 64(2-3), 429–438 (2001). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

J. Fernàndez-Bayó, O. Barbero, C. Rubies, M. Sentís, and L. Donoso, “Distributing Medical Images with Internet Technologies: a DICOM Web Server and a DICOM Java Viewer,” Radiographics 20(2), 581–590 (2000). [PubMed]

5.

R. N. J. Graham, R. W. Perriss, and A. F. Scarsbrook, “DICOM demystified: A review of digital file formats and their use in radiological practice,” Clin. Radiol. 60(11), 1133–1140 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

IBM, “Tape storage systems,” http://www-03.ibm.com/systems/storage/tape/.

7.

P. J. van Heerden, “Theory of optical information storage in solids,” Appl. Opt. 2(4), 393 (1963). [CrossRef]

8.

A. Pu and D. Psaltis, “Holographic data storage with 100 bits/μm2 density,” Optical Data Storage Topical Meeting Conference Digest, 48–49 (1997).

9.

G. W. Burr, C. M. Jefferson, H. Coufal, C. Gollasch, M. Jurich, J. A. Hoffnagle, R. Macfarlane, and R. M. Shelby, “Volume holographic data storage at an areal density of 100 Gbit/in2,” Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, 188–189 (2000).

10.

N. Butt, K. Mcstay, A. Cestero, H. Ho, W. Kong, S. Fang, R. Krishnan, B. Khan, A. Tessier, W. Davies, S. Lee, Y. Zhang, J. Johnson, S. Rombawa, R. Takalkar, A. Blauberg, K. V. Hawkins, J. Liu, S. Rosenblatt, P. Goyal, S. Gupta, J. Ervin, Z. Li, S. Galis, J. Barth, M. Yin, T. Weaver, J. H. Li, S. Narasimha, P. Parries, W. K. Henson, N. Robson, T. Kirihata, M. Chudzik, E. Maciejewski, P. Agnello, S. Stiffler, and S. S. Iyer, “A 0.039 μm2 High Performance eDRAM Cell based on 32nm High-K/Metal SOI Technology,” IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting, 27.5.1 – 27.5.4 (2010).

11.

L. Hesselink, S. Orlov, and M. Bashaw, “Holographic data storage systems,” Proc. IEEE 92(8), 1231–1280 (2004). [CrossRef]

12.

J. J. Amodei and D. L. Staebler, “Holographic pattern fixing in electro-optic crystals,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 18(12), 540–542 (1971). [CrossRef]

13.

F. Micheron and G. Bismuth, “Electrical control of fixation and erasure of holographic patterns in ferroelectric materials,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 20(2), 79–81 (1972). [CrossRef]

14.

D. von der Linde, A. M. Glass, and K. F. Rodgers, “Multiphoton photorefractive processes for optical storage in LiNbO3,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 25(3), 155–157 (1974). [CrossRef]

15.

D. Psaltis, K. Buse, and A. Adibi, “Non-volatile holographic storage in doubly doped lithium niobate crystals,” Nature 393(6686), 665–668 (1998). [CrossRef]

16.

F. Liu, Y. Kong, X. Ge, H. Liu, S. Liu, S. Chen, R. Rupp, and J. Xu, “Improved sensitivity of nonvolatile holographic storage in triply doped LiNbO3:Zr,Cu,Ce,” Opt. Express 18(6), 6333–6339 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

17.

K. Meerholz, B. L. Volodin, B. Sandalphon, Kippelen, and N. Peyghambarian, “A Photorefractive polymer with high optical gain and diffraction efficiency near 100%,” Nature 357, 479–500 (1994).

18.

S. Tay, P.-A. Blanche, R. Voorakaranam, A. V. Tunç, W. Lin, S. Rokutanda, T. Gu, D. Flores, P. Wang, G. Li, P. St Hilaire, J. Thomas, R. A. Norwood, M. Yamamoto, and N. Peyghambarian, “An updatable holographic three-dimensional display,” Nature 451(7179), 694–698 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

19.

K. Curtis, L. Dhar, A. Hill, W. Wilson, and M. Ayres, Holographic Data Storage: From Theory to Practical Systems (Wiley, 2010).

20.

G. Barbastathis, M. Levene, and D. Psaltis, “Shift multiplexing with spherical reference waves,” Appl. Opt. 35(14), 2403–2417 (1996). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

21.

H. Y. S. Li and D. Psaltis, “Three-dimensional holographic disks,” Appl. Opt. 33(17), 3764–3774 (1994). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

22.

T. C. Teng, Y. W. Yu, and C. C. Sun, “Enlarging multiplexing capacity with reduced radial cross talk in volume holographic discs,” Opt. Express 14(8), 3187–3192 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

23.

J. W. Goodman, Introduction to Fourier Optics (McGraw-Hill, 2002).

24.

C. C. Sun, “Simplified model for diffraction analysis of volume holograms,” Opt. Eng. 42(5), 1184–1185 (2003). [CrossRef]

25.

G. P. Nordin and P. Asthana, “Effects of cross talk on fidelity in page-oriented volume holographic optical data storage,” Opt. Lett. 18(18), 1553–1555 (1993). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

26.

Members of the Technical Staff, Bell Laboratories, Transmission Systems for Communications (Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, N.J., 1971), Chap. 30, p. 726.

27.

M. Born and E. Wolf, Principles of Optics, 6th ed. (Pergamon, New York, 1980), p. 382.

OCIS Codes
(210.2860) Optical data storage : Holographic and volume memories

ToC Category:
Optical Data Storage

History
Original Manuscript: May 15, 2012
Revised Manuscript: August 2, 2012
Manuscript Accepted: August 5, 2012
Published: August 28, 2012

Citation
Yeh-Wei Yu, Chih-Yuan Cheng, Tun-Chien Teng, Cheng-Hsien Chen, Shiuan-Huei Lin, Bo-Rong Wu, Che-Chih Hsu, Yi-Jiun Chen, Xuan-Hao Lee, Chi-Yu Wu, and Ching-Cherng Sun, "Method of compensating for pixel migration in volume holographic optical disc (VHOD)," Opt. Express 20, 20863-20873 (2012)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-20-19-20863


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References

  1. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM), NEMA Standards Publications. http://medical.nema.org/ .
  2. K. D. Foord, “PACS workstation respecification: display, data flow, system integration, and environmental issues, derived from analysis of the Conquest Hospital pre-DICOM PACS experience,” Eur. Radiol.9(6), 1161–1169 (1999). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. J. Bernarding, A. Thiel, and A. Grzesik, “A JAVA-based DICOM server with integration of clinical findings and DICOM-conform data encryption,” Int. J. Med. Inform.64(2-3), 429–438 (2001). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. J. Fernàndez-Bayó, O. Barbero, C. Rubies, M. Sentís, and L. Donoso, “Distributing Medical Images with Internet Technologies: a DICOM Web Server and a DICOM Java Viewer,” Radiographics20(2), 581–590 (2000). [PubMed]
  5. R. N. J. Graham, R. W. Perriss, and A. F. Scarsbrook, “DICOM demystified: A review of digital file formats and their use in radiological practice,” Clin. Radiol.60(11), 1133–1140 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. IBM, “Tape storage systems,” http://www-03.ibm.com/systems/storage/tape/ .
  7. P. J. van Heerden, “Theory of optical information storage in solids,” Appl. Opt.2(4), 393 (1963). [CrossRef]
  8. A. Pu and D. Psaltis, “Holographic data storage with 100 bits/μm2 density,” Optical Data Storage Topical Meeting Conference Digest, 48–49 (1997).
  9. G. W. Burr, C. M. Jefferson, H. Coufal, C. Gollasch, M. Jurich, J. A. Hoffnagle, R. Macfarlane, and R. M. Shelby, “Volume holographic data storage at an areal density of 100 Gbit/in2,” Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, 188–189 (2000).
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