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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 20, Iss. 28 — Dec. 31, 2012
  • pp: 29149–29154
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Dynamic virtual GMPLS-controlled WSON using a Resource Broker with a VNT Manager on the ADRENALINE testbed

Ricard Vilalta, Raul Muñoz, Ramon Casellas, and Ricardo Martinez  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 20, Issue 28, pp. 29149-29154 (2012)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.20.029149


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Abstract

We present a Resource Broker with a Virtual Network Topology Manager (VNTM) which dynamically deploys virtual GMPLS-controlled WSON networks. Virtual Optical links are constructed by grouping established optical connections which are managed by the VNTM. We evaluate the performance of the Resource Broker in the ADRENALINE testbed.

© 2012 OSA

1. Introduction

Optical Network Virtualization involves the dynamic provisioning of dedicated virtual networks over the same physical optical infrastructure, which is attracting a lot of attention from network infrastructure providers, with the purpose of offering their Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS). Optical network virtualization technologies allow the partitioning/aggregation of the network infrastructure into independent virtual resources, where each virtual resource has the same functionality as the physical resource [1

1. R. Nejabati, E. Escalona, S. Peng, and D. Simeonidou, “Optical network virtualization,” in Proc. of Optical Network Design and Modeling (ONDM), 2011, http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=5753389.

]. Virtual Optical Networks (VON) support the heterogeneous and stringent infrastructure network requirements of the emerging dynamic and bandwidth-hungry applications such as high-definition video streaming and cloud computing. Thus, service providers can dynamically request, on a per need basis, a dedicated VON for each application and have full control over it. In order to independently provide the functionalities of automatical optical connection provisioning, traffic engineering and dynamic protection/restoration to the resulting virtual instances, a VON must be composed of not only a virtual transport plane but also of a virtual control plane.

2. System architecture

Figure 1 shows the proposed system architecture. A virtualizable GMPLS/PCE-controlled WSON network is managed by the proposed Resource Broker, which is the responsible for managing the incoming asynchronous and dynamic VON requests, which consists on the allocation of the new VON, the modification of resources assigned to an existing VON or the releasing of the resources in case a VON is torn down.

Fig. 1 Resource Broker system architecture

The Resource Manager handles the virtual control resources. It manages the available IP subnetworks that shall be used to establish the virtual IP Control Channel (IPCC) to later deploy dedicated Data Communication Network (DCN) for each virtual transport plane. It is also responsible for managing the number and location of the available virtual GMPLS controllers that each physical GMPLS controller supports (static partitioning), as well as their configuration information (including the management IP address, the amount of CPU power and the available RAM). It also stores all the information required to configure the processes (e.g., routing, signaling, etc.) running in the virtual GMPLS controllers.

The VON Controller accepts incoming TCP sessions, used to reliably transport VON requests, and handles these requests asynchronously and dynamically. Once the VON identifier is assigned, or found, the VON controller triggers the resource allocator in order to process the VON request.

The Resource Allocator assigns the control resources to the requested VON. For the virtual control plane, it allocates the virtual GMPLS controllers, and assigns the GMPLS router address. It also assigns IP addresses and GRE tunnels for the required IPCC.

The Resource Configurator generates the virtual transport and control plane configuration XML file, which describes a VON scenario model that can be set up, modified or torn down by means of ADRENALINE Network Configurator (ADNETCONF) [3

3. F. Galán and R. Muñoz, “An automatic model-based reconfiguration and monitoring mechanism for flexible GMPLS-based optical networking testbeds,” in ONDM Lecture Notes in Computer Science 4534/2007, 239–248, http://www.springerlink.com/content/9v0m633420853021/.

]. This is a proprietary software tool in charge of scenario model management in ADRENALINE testbed [4

4. R. Muñoz, C. Pinart, R. Martinez, J. Sorribes, M. Maier, A. Amrani, and G. Junyent, “The adrenaline testbed: integrating GMPLS, XML, and SNMP in transparent DWDM networks,” IEEE Commun. Mag 43(8), 40–48 (2005). [CrossRef]

]. Using ADNETCONF, the scenario model is then serialized to the formal representation of the scenario that the processing engine understands. Up to five different XML files are produced; one describing the logical DCN topology for the virtual control plane, and the others describing the configuration of the different GMPLS processes.

3. Experimental assessment and performance evaluation

In this section we present a experimental assessment and a performance evaluation of the proposed system architecture on the virtualizable GMPLS-controlled WSON platform of the ADRENALINE Testbed [5

5. R. Muñoz, R. Casellas, R. Martinez, R. Vilalta, J. Vilchez, and J. Vazquez, “Virtualizing adrenaline testbed for deploying dynamic GMPLS-controlled wson as a service,” in Proc. of OFC/NFOEC, 2011, http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=5875311.

].

3.1. Experimental assessment

The GMPLS-controlled WSON platform of the ADRENALINE Testbed is composed of an all-optical WSON infrastructure with 2 ROADMs and 2 OXCs providing reconfigurable (in space and in frequency) end-to-end lightpaths, deploying a total of 610 km of G.652 and G.655 optical fiber, with six DWDM wavelengths per optical link. Each optical node is equipped with a virtualization server running in a Linux-based router with an Intel Core 2 Duo E6550 2.33 GHz processor.

Fig. 2 Wireshark Capture of a Path Computation Request (left), LSP Setup XML messages (center) and Resource Broker with VNTM message exchange (right)

Once all the necessary LSPs have been established, the necessary virtual GMPLS control plane resources need to be allocated. To this end, the established LSPs are used as virtual TE links. Finally, once the VON configuration is generated, the VON Configurator, by means of ADNETCONF, is the responsible to set up or tear down the requested VON. We observe that the virtual GMPLS-controlled WSON setup and tear down delay for our testbed are 17s and 7s, respectively.

3.2. Experimental performance evaluation

Figure 3 depicts the blocking rate of VON requests in the NSFNet topology scenario for the proposed VON RA SPUB-FF algorithm. For a given VON request load of 1 Er., the obtained blocking rate of VON requests is 18.2%. This higher bloking rate is due to the fact that several of the randomly constructed requests cannot satisfy the WCC. For a VON request load of 5 Er. the VON blocking rate is of 26.3%.

Fig. 3 VON request blocking rate

Fig. 4 VON setup delay

4. Conclusions

We have presented the SPUB-FF algorithm and evaluated its performance in terms of blocking rate of VON requests and VON setup delay. We propose further study on more complex VON RA algorithms, taking into account GCO, which will lead to a more efficient usage of the available physical optical network resources.

Acknowledgments

This work was supported partially by the Spanish Ministery of Economy and Competitivity through the project DORADO (TEC2009-07995).

References and links

1.

R. Nejabati, E. Escalona, S. Peng, and D. Simeonidou, “Optical network virtualization,” in Proc. of Optical Network Design and Modeling (ONDM), 2011, http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=5753389.

2.

R. Vilalta, R. Muñoz, R. Casellas, and R. Martinez, “Experimental demonstration of a virtual optical network resource broker and compositor for dynamic GMPLS WSON infrastructure services,” in Proc. of OFC/NFOEC, 2012, http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=OFC-2012-OM3G.4.

3.

F. Galán and R. Muñoz, “An automatic model-based reconfiguration and monitoring mechanism for flexible GMPLS-based optical networking testbeds,” in ONDM Lecture Notes in Computer Science 4534/2007, 239–248, http://www.springerlink.com/content/9v0m633420853021/.

4.

R. Muñoz, C. Pinart, R. Martinez, J. Sorribes, M. Maier, A. Amrani, and G. Junyent, “The adrenaline testbed: integrating GMPLS, XML, and SNMP in transparent DWDM networks,” IEEE Commun. Mag 43(8), 40–48 (2005). [CrossRef]

5.

R. Muñoz, R. Casellas, R. Martinez, R. Vilalta, J. Vilchez, and J. Vazquez, “Virtualizing adrenaline testbed for deploying dynamic GMPLS-controlled wson as a service,” in Proc. of OFC/NFOEC, 2011, http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=5875311.

6.

R. Vilalta, R. Muñoz, R. Casellas, and R. Martinez, “Dynamic virtual GMPLS-controlled WSON using a resource broker with a VNT Manager on the adrenaline testbed,” in Proc. of European Conference on Optical Communications (ECOC), 2012.

7.

Y. Lee, JL. Le Roux, D. King, and E. Oki, “Path Computation Element Communication Protocol (PCEP) requirements and protocol extensions in support of global concurrent optimization,” IETF RFC5557, 2009, http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5557.

OCIS Codes
(060.4250) Fiber optics and optical communications : Networks
(060.4258) Fiber optics and optical communications : Networks, network topology

ToC Category:
Backbone and Core Networks

History
Original Manuscript: October 1, 2012
Revised Manuscript: November 27, 2012
Manuscript Accepted: November 29, 2012
Published: December 17, 2012

Virtual Issues
European Conference on Optical Communication 2012 (2012) Optics Express

Citation
Ricard Vilalta, Raul Muñoz, Ramon Casellas, and Ricardo Martinez, "Dynamic virtual GMPLS-controlled WSON using a Resource Broker with a VNT Manager on the ADRENALINE testbed," Opt. Express 20, 29149-29154 (2012)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-20-28-29149


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References

  1. R. Nejabati, E. Escalona, S. Peng, and D. Simeonidou, “Optical network virtualization,” in Proc. of Optical Network Design and Modeling (ONDM), 2011, http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=5753389 .
  2. R. Vilalta, R. Muñoz, R. Casellas, and R. Martinez, “Experimental demonstration of a virtual optical network resource broker and compositor for dynamic GMPLS WSON infrastructure services,” in Proc. of OFC/NFOEC, 2012, http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=OFC-2012-OM3G.4 .
  3. F. Galán and R. Muñoz, “An automatic model-based reconfiguration and monitoring mechanism for flexible GMPLS-based optical networking testbeds,” in ONDM Lecture Notes in Computer Science4534/2007, 239–248, http://www.springerlink.com/content/9v0m633420853021/ .
  4. R. Muñoz, C. Pinart, R. Martinez, J. Sorribes, M. Maier, A. Amrani, and G. Junyent, “The adrenaline testbed: integrating GMPLS, XML, and SNMP in transparent DWDM networks,” IEEE Commun. Mag43(8), 40–48 (2005). [CrossRef]
  5. R. Muñoz, R. Casellas, R. Martinez, R. Vilalta, J. Vilchez, and J. Vazquez, “Virtualizing adrenaline testbed for deploying dynamic GMPLS-controlled wson as a service,” in Proc. of OFC/NFOEC, 2011, http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=5875311 .
  6. R. Vilalta, R. Muñoz, R. Casellas, and R. Martinez, “Dynamic virtual GMPLS-controlled WSON using a resource broker with a VNT Manager on the adrenaline testbed,” in Proc. of European Conference on Optical Communications (ECOC), 2012.
  7. Y. Lee, JL. Le Roux, D. King, and E. Oki, “Path Computation Element Communication Protocol (PCEP) requirements and protocol extensions in support of global concurrent optimization,” IETF RFC5557, 2009, http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5557 .

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