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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 20, Iss. 5 — Feb. 27, 2012
  • pp: 5313–5318
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175 fs Tm:Lu2O3 laser at 2.07 µm mode-locked using single-walled carbon nanotubes

Andreas Schmidt, Philipp Koopmann, Günter Huber, Peter Fuhrberg, Sun Young Choi, Dong-Il Yeom, Fabian Rotermund, Valentin Petrov, and Uwe Griebner  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 20, Issue 5, pp. 5313-5318 (2012)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.20.005313


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Abstract

Single–walled carbon nanotube saturable absorbers were designed and fabricated for passive mode-locking of bulk lasers operating in the 2 μm spectral range. Mode-locked lasers based on Tm:Lu2O3 single crystals containing different Tm3+-doping concentrations were studied. Nearly transform-limited pulses as short as 175 fs at 2070 nm were generated at 88 MHz repetition rate.

© 2012 OSA

1. Introduction

The eye-safe laser emission region around 2 µm covered by Tm3+, Ho3+, and codoped (Tm3+-Ho3+) active media is important for medical applications, mainly due to the strong optical absorption by water, and remote sensing (LIDAR) of CO2 and water in the atmosphere [1

1. A. Godard, “Infrared (2–12 μm) solid-state laser sources: a review,” C. R. Phys. 8(10), 1100–1128 (2007). [CrossRef]

]. Ultrashort pulse laser sources in the 2 µm spectral region are of particular interest as pump sources for synchronously-pumped optical parametric oscillators operating in the mid-IR above 5 µm, as seeders of chirped-pulse optical parametric amplifiers pumped near 1 µm for high-order harmonic and soft-X-ray generation, for IR supercontinuum or THz generation, and for time-resolved molecular spectroscopy in the molecular fingerprint region [2

2. F. Adler, P. Masłowski, A. Foltynowicz, K. C. Cossel, T. C. Briles, I. Hartl, and J. Ye, “Mid-infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy with a broadband frequency comb,” Opt. Express 18(21), 21861–21872 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

In recent years the direct generation of ultrashort pulses near 2 μm was demonstrated using Tm- and Tm,Ho-doped solid-state bulk or fiber lasers and semiconductor disk lasers (SDL). The latter are limited to low pulse energies due to their intrinsically high repetition rates in the GHz range. The only demonstrated fs-SDL, containing GaSb semiconductor structures, delivered pulses with a duration of 384 fs at 1960 nm [3

3. A. Härkönen, C. Grebing, J. Paajaste, R. Koskinen, J.-P. Alanko, S. Suomalainen, G. Steinmeyer, and M. Guina, “Modelocked GaSb disk laser producing 384 fs pulses at 2 μm wavelength,” Electron. Lett. 47, 454–456 (2011).

]. Tm3+ and Ho3+ both operate as quasi-three-level systems near 2 µm but the advantage of the Tm-laser is the possibility of direct diode pumping with AlGaAs diodes. The first sub-ps 2-µm lasers were based on mode-locked Tm- and Tm,Ho-doped fiber lasers. In 1995, Nelson et al. demonstrated generation of 500-fs pulses [4

4. L. E. Nelson, E. P. Ippen, and H. A. Haus, “Broadly tunable sub-500 fs pulses from an additive-pulse mode-locked thulium-doped fiber laser,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 67, 19–21 (1995). [CrossRef]

] using a spectral filter and the nonlinear polarization rotation approach. Shortly afterwards, Sharp et al. achieved 190-fs pulses with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) mode-locked Tm-doped fiber laser, the shortest pulses to date out of a 2-µm oscillator [5

5. R. C. Sharp, D. E. Spock, N. Pan, and J. Elliot, “190-fs passively mode-locked thulium fiber laser with a low threshold,” Opt. Lett. 21(12), 881–883 (1996). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Higher pulse energy of 4 nJ at 41 MHz was demonstrated using a Tm-fiber laser operating in the stretched-pulse regime. The pulses with a duration of 1.2 ps could be compressed outside the cavity to 173 fs [6

6. M. Engelbrecht, F. Haxsen, A. Ruehl, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Ultrafast thulium-doped fiber-oscillator with pulse energy of 4.3 nJ,” Opt. Lett. 33(7), 690–692 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

Tm- and Tm,Ho-doped bulk gain materials are an alternative choice for the development of high-power ultrashort-pulse lasers in the 2-μm spectral region. Among them, the Tm-doped sesquioxide single crystals stand out because of their high thermal conductivity, even when doped with high Tm3+-concentrations. However, in most laser crystals high doping concentrations lead to a strong decrease of the thermal conductivity like, e.g., observed in YAG. This in turn leads to a strong heating of the crystal which is detrimental, in particular for quasi-three level lasers. The strong decrease of the thermal conductivity is not observed in thulium-doped Lu2O3, since the masses of the thulium and lutetium ions differ by only 3% and thus the phonon propagation gets only slightly constrained. Furthermore, Tm:Lu2O3 exhibits the advantages of broad absorption and emission spectra, high emission cross sections, and low phonon energies [7

7. P. Koopmann, R. Peters, K. Petermann, and G. Huber, “Crystal growth, spectroscopy, and highly efficient laser operation of thulium-doped Lu2O3 around 2 µm,” Appl. Phys. B 102, 19–24 (2011).

]. In continuous-wave (CW) regime a diode-pumped Tm:Lu2O3 laser at 2065 nm delivering 75-W output power with a slope efficiency of 39% and spectral tuning from 1922 nm to 2134 nm was already demonstrated [8

8. P. Koopmann, S. Lamrini, K. Scholle, P. Fuhrberg, K. Petermann, and G. Huber, “Efficient diode-pumped laser operation of Tm:Lu2O3 around 2 μm,” Opt. Lett. 36(6), 948–950 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

The first passively mode-locked Tm-doped bulk laser using single-walled carbon nanotubes as saturable absorber (SWCNT-SA) was demonstrated in 2009. The Tm:KLu(WO4)2 laser produced 10-ps pulses at 1944 nm [9

9. W. B. Cho, A. Schmidt, J. H. Yim, S. Y. Choi, S. Lee, F. Rotermund, U. Griebner, G. Steinmeyer, V. Petrov, X. Mateos, M. C. Pujol, J. J. Carvajal, M. Aguiló, and F. Díaz, “Passive mode-locking of a Tm-doped bulk laser near 2 μm using a carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” Opt. Express 17, 11007–11009 (2009). [PubMed]

]. SWCNT-SAs were also successfully employed to mode-lock Tm-doped fiber lasers [10

10. S. Kivistö, T. Hakulinen, A. Kaskela, B. Aitchison, D. P. Brown, A. G. Nasibulin, E. I. Kauppinen, A. Härkönen, and O. G. Okhotnikov, “Carbon nanotube films for ultrafast broadband technology,” Opt. Express 17(4), 2358–2363 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 11

11. K. Kieu and F. W. Wise, “Soliton thulium-doped fiber laser with carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 21(3), 128–130 (2009). [CrossRef]

] whereby the shortest pulse duration amounted to 750 fs [11

11. K. Kieu and F. W. Wise, “Soliton thulium-doped fiber laser with carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 21(3), 128–130 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. Recently femtosecond lasers around 2 µm containing bulk gain media were realized. A Tm-doped fluorogermanate glass [12

12. F. Fusari, A. A. Lagatsky, G. Jose, S. Calvez, A. Jha, M. D. Dawson, J. A. Gupta, W. Sibbett, and C. T. Brown, “Femtosecond mode-locked Tm(3+) and Tm(3+)-Ho(3+) doped 2 μm glass lasers,” Opt. Express 18(21), 22090–22098 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] and KY(WO4)2 laser [13

13. A. A. Lagatsky, S. Calvez, J. A. Gupta, V. E. Kisel, N. V. Kuleshov, C. T. Brown, M. D. Dawson, and W. Sibbett, “Broadly tunable femtosecond mode-locking in a Tm:KYW laser near 2 μm,” Opt. Express 19(10), 9995–10000 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] yielded pulse durations of 410 fs and 386 fs, respectively. Lasers based on Tm,Ho codoped KY(WO4)2 [14

14. A. A. Lagatsky, F. Fusari, S. Calvez, S. V. Kurilchik, V. E. Kisel, N. V. Kuleshov, M. D. Dawson, C. T. A. Brown, and W. Sibbett, “Femtosecond pulse operation of a Tm,Ho-codoped crystalline laser near 2 µm,” Opt. Lett. 35, 172–175 (2010). [PubMed]

] and NaY(WO4)2 [15

15. A. A. Lagatsky, X. Han, M. D. Serrano, C. Cascales, C. Zaldo, S. Calvez, M. D. Dawson, J. A. Gupta, C. T. Brown, and W. Sibbett, “Femtosecond (191 fs) NaY(WO4)2 Tm,Ho-codoped laser at 2060 nm,” Opt. Lett. 35(18), 3027–3029 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], both operating around 2060 nm, delivered pulses as short as 570 fs and 191 fs, respectively. All reported femtosecond bulk lasers operating at 2 µm were passively mode-locked by SESAMs.

SWCNT-SAs are unique nanostructures which, due to their fast third order optical nonlinearity and saturable absorption effects, can act as a potential replacement for SESAMs. While SESAMs have to be fabricated by very complex epitaxial processes, SWCNT-SAs profit from simple production technology and low manufacture cost. In addition, natural mixture of SWCNTs of different diameters and chiralities provides much broader absorption band than that of SESAMs. SWCNT-SAs have proven their suitability for use as SAs for mode-locking during the last ten years. A number of different active materials, fiber as well as bulk lasers, were mode-locked by SWCNT-SAs in the wavelength range between 800 nm and 2000 nm [16

16. T. R. Schibli, K. Minoshima, H. Kataura, E. Itoga, N. Minami, S. Kazaoui, K. Miyashita, M. Tokumoto, and Y. Sakakibara, “Ultrashort pulse-generation by saturable mirrors based on polymer embedded carbon nanotubes,” Opt. Express 13, 8025–8031 (2005). [PubMed]

18

18. W. B. Cho, J. H. Yim, S. Y. Choi, S. Lee, A. Schmidt, G. Steinmeyer, U. Griebner, V. Petrov, D.-I. Yeom, K. Kim, and F. Rotermund, “Boosting the nonlinear optical response of carbon nanotube saturable absorbers for broadband mode-locking of bulk lasers,” Adv. Funct. Mater. 20, 1937–1943 (2010).

].

Here we report picosecond and femtosecond mode-locking of Tm:Lu2O3 employing SWCNTs as saturable absorbers. We demonstrate the generation of pulses as short as 175 fs, the shortest to date for any laser oscillator around 2 µm. Furthermore we present results achieved with different Tm3+ doping levels.

2. Experimental setup

High-quality Tm-doped Lu2O3 single crystals with dopant concentrations of 1 at.%, 1.8 at.%, and 5 at.% were grown by the Heat-Exchanger Method [19

19. R. Peters, C. Kränkel, K. Petermann, and G. Huber, “Crystal growth by the heat exchanger method, spectroscopic characterization and laser operation of high purity Yb:Lu2O3,” J. Cryst. Growth 310(7-9), 1934–1938 (2008). [CrossRef]

]. The uncoated samples had a thickness of 2 mm with an aperture of 3 mm × 3 mm. The SWCNT-SA used in the present work was based on arc-made SWCNTs and can basically also be applied in the 1 µm spectral range. While the absorption band around 1 µm corresponds to the E22-transition of SWCNTs, the E11-transition is utilized near 2 µm. The SWCNT-SAs were fabricated by the spin coating method on a quartz substrate as described in Ref. 18

18. W. B. Cho, J. H. Yim, S. Y. Choi, S. Lee, A. Schmidt, G. Steinmeyer, U. Griebner, V. Petrov, D.-I. Yeom, K. Kim, and F. Rotermund, “Boosting the nonlinear optical response of carbon nanotube saturable absorbers for broadband mode-locking of bulk lasers,” Adv. Funct. Mater. 20, 1937–1943 (2010).

.

The linear transmission of the SWCNT-SA used for mode-locking is shown in Fig. 1
Fig. 1 Linear transmission spectrum of the arc-discharge SWCNT saturable absorber indicating the E11- and E22-transitions of semiconducting nanotubes.
. We have characterized the nonlinear response of similar SWCNT-SAs at 2 µm, resulting in a very fast relaxation time of about 1 ps. The preparation for the measurement of the nonlinear reflectivity near 2 µm is still in progress. We expect a saturation fluence of <10 μJ/cm2 and a modulation depth of <1%, similar to the values for the E22-transition of the same SWCNTs [9

9. W. B. Cho, A. Schmidt, J. H. Yim, S. Y. Choi, S. Lee, F. Rotermund, U. Griebner, G. Steinmeyer, V. Petrov, X. Mateos, M. C. Pujol, J. J. Carvajal, M. Aguiló, and F. Díaz, “Passive mode-locking of a Tm-doped bulk laser near 2 μm using a carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” Opt. Express 17, 11007–11009 (2009). [PubMed]

]. The experimental laser set-up was similar to that described in [17

17. A. Schmidt, S. Rivier, W. B. Cho, J. H. Yim, S. Y. Choi, S. Lee, F. Rotermund, D. Rytz, G. Steinmeyer, V. Petrov, and U. Griebner, “Sub-100 fs single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber mode-locked Yb-laser operation near 1 µm,” Opt. Express 17, 20109–20116 (2009). [PubMed]

]. A Ti:sapphire laser emitting up to 2 W of output power at 798 nm served as a pump source. The actively cooled Tm:Lu2O3 crystal was placed at Brewster angle in between two folding mirrors with radius-of-curvature (ROC) = 10 cm. One resonator arm was additionally folded using two highly reflecting focusing mirrors (ROC = 10 cm and 5 cm). The transmission-type SWCNT-SA was placed at Brewster angle in the vicinity of this second resonator waist to enhance the intensity on the absorber. The other resonator arm contained a plane output coupler and prisms could be introduced to control the dispersion.

3. SWCNT-SA mode-locked Tm:Lu2O3 laser

Initially we studied the SWCNT-SA mode-locked operation in the picosecond regime using the 1 at.% Tm3+-doped Lu2O3 crystal. In this configuration, without the prism pair in the cavity, the laser delivered 31 ps at a repetition rate of 128 MHz. The average output power applying an output coupling of 1.5% amounted to 88 mW at an absorbed pump power of approximately 1 W. The intensity autocorrelation and the corresponding fit, assuming a sech2 pulse shape, are shown in Fig. 2
Fig. 2 Picosecond Tm:Lu2O3 laser mode-locked by SWCNT-SA: (a) autocorrelation trace and sech2-fit, (b) first beat note of the RF spectrum; inset: 1 GHz scan.
. The optical spectrum had a FWHM below 0.5 nm at a center wavelength of 1965 nm. The radio frequency spectra recorded at a resolution bandwidth (RBW) of 100 kHz and 1 kHz, respectively, do not show any spurious modulation and indicate clean CW mode-locking with the fundamental beat-note being 49 dB above noise level.

In contrast to the study in the picosecond regime at 1965 nm, for the femtosecond regime the emission wavelength had to be shifted to >2000 nm because the water vapor absorption in the 1800-2000 nm region prevented broadband mode-locking. For this purpose we decided to operate the laser at low inversion levels where the gain cross section of Tm:Lu2O3 is highest around 2065 nm, cf. Figure 3
Fig. 3 Femtosecond Tm:Lu2O3 laser mode-locked by SWCNT-SA: (a) autocorrelation trace (dots) and fit (line) assuming a sech2-pulse shape, (b) optical spectrum.
in Ref. 8

8. P. Koopmann, S. Lamrini, K. Scholle, P. Fuhrberg, K. Petermann, and G. Huber, “Efficient diode-pumped laser operation of Tm:Lu2O3 around 2 μm,” Opt. Lett. 36(6), 948–950 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

. This approach was not successful when using the 1 at. % doped Tm:Lu2O3 crystal, despite applied output coupler transmissions as low as 0.2%. Increasing the Tm-doping level and hence the reabsorption loss we were able to operate the laser in the desired spectral range above 2000 nm.

First the 1.8 at.% Tm-doped Lu2O3 sample was investigated in the femtosecond regime. The pump absorption increased to 57% in the single pass resulting in higher output powers compared to the previously used 1 at.% Tm-doped crystal. For the femtosecond regime we optimized the cavity design and introduced two CaF2 prisms resulting in a repetition rate of 90 MHz. Using a 0.2% output coupler stable CW mode-locking was achieved yielding 30 mW of average output power. The optical spectrum was centered at 2061 nm and had a bandwidth of 15.5 nm (FWHM). From the measured autocorrelation trace a pulse duration of 279 fs was derived assuming a sech2-pulse shape.

The radio-frequency (RF) spectra of the SWCNT-SA mode-locked Tm:Lu2O3 laser are shown in Fig. 4
Fig. 4 RF spectrum of the femtosecond Tm:Lu2O3 laser mode-locked by SWCNT-SA: (a) first beat note, (b) 1 GHz scan.
. Measured at a resolution bandwidth of 1 kHz in a ~200 kHz span, the fundamental beat note at 87.83 MHz displays an extinction ratio of 65 dB above carrier (Fig. 4(a)). As further evidence for stable CW single-pulse operation without Q-switching, Fig. 4(b) depicts a 1 GHz wide-span RF measurement.

Table 1

Table 1. Parameters of Different Mode-Locked Tm:Lu2O3 Lasers

table-icon
View This Table
summarizes the best output parameters achieved with the three Tm:Lu2O3 crystals in the mode-locked regime at repetition rates of 128, 90, and 88 MHz, respectively.

4. Conclusions

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the National Research Foundation (NRF) grants funded by the Korean Government (MEST) (2011-0017494 and 2011-0001054).

References and links

1.

A. Godard, “Infrared (2–12 μm) solid-state laser sources: a review,” C. R. Phys. 8(10), 1100–1128 (2007). [CrossRef]

2.

F. Adler, P. Masłowski, A. Foltynowicz, K. C. Cossel, T. C. Briles, I. Hartl, and J. Ye, “Mid-infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy with a broadband frequency comb,” Opt. Express 18(21), 21861–21872 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

A. Härkönen, C. Grebing, J. Paajaste, R. Koskinen, J.-P. Alanko, S. Suomalainen, G. Steinmeyer, and M. Guina, “Modelocked GaSb disk laser producing 384 fs pulses at 2 μm wavelength,” Electron. Lett. 47, 454–456 (2011).

4.

L. E. Nelson, E. P. Ippen, and H. A. Haus, “Broadly tunable sub-500 fs pulses from an additive-pulse mode-locked thulium-doped fiber laser,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 67, 19–21 (1995). [CrossRef]

5.

R. C. Sharp, D. E. Spock, N. Pan, and J. Elliot, “190-fs passively mode-locked thulium fiber laser with a low threshold,” Opt. Lett. 21(12), 881–883 (1996). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

M. Engelbrecht, F. Haxsen, A. Ruehl, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Ultrafast thulium-doped fiber-oscillator with pulse energy of 4.3 nJ,” Opt. Lett. 33(7), 690–692 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

P. Koopmann, R. Peters, K. Petermann, and G. Huber, “Crystal growth, spectroscopy, and highly efficient laser operation of thulium-doped Lu2O3 around 2 µm,” Appl. Phys. B 102, 19–24 (2011).

8.

P. Koopmann, S. Lamrini, K. Scholle, P. Fuhrberg, K. Petermann, and G. Huber, “Efficient diode-pumped laser operation of Tm:Lu2O3 around 2 μm,” Opt. Lett. 36(6), 948–950 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9.

W. B. Cho, A. Schmidt, J. H. Yim, S. Y. Choi, S. Lee, F. Rotermund, U. Griebner, G. Steinmeyer, V. Petrov, X. Mateos, M. C. Pujol, J. J. Carvajal, M. Aguiló, and F. Díaz, “Passive mode-locking of a Tm-doped bulk laser near 2 μm using a carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” Opt. Express 17, 11007–11009 (2009). [PubMed]

10.

S. Kivistö, T. Hakulinen, A. Kaskela, B. Aitchison, D. P. Brown, A. G. Nasibulin, E. I. Kauppinen, A. Härkönen, and O. G. Okhotnikov, “Carbon nanotube films for ultrafast broadband technology,” Opt. Express 17(4), 2358–2363 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

K. Kieu and F. W. Wise, “Soliton thulium-doped fiber laser with carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 21(3), 128–130 (2009). [CrossRef]

12.

F. Fusari, A. A. Lagatsky, G. Jose, S. Calvez, A. Jha, M. D. Dawson, J. A. Gupta, W. Sibbett, and C. T. Brown, “Femtosecond mode-locked Tm(3+) and Tm(3+)-Ho(3+) doped 2 μm glass lasers,” Opt. Express 18(21), 22090–22098 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

A. A. Lagatsky, S. Calvez, J. A. Gupta, V. E. Kisel, N. V. Kuleshov, C. T. Brown, M. D. Dawson, and W. Sibbett, “Broadly tunable femtosecond mode-locking in a Tm:KYW laser near 2 μm,” Opt. Express 19(10), 9995–10000 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

A. A. Lagatsky, F. Fusari, S. Calvez, S. V. Kurilchik, V. E. Kisel, N. V. Kuleshov, M. D. Dawson, C. T. A. Brown, and W. Sibbett, “Femtosecond pulse operation of a Tm,Ho-codoped crystalline laser near 2 µm,” Opt. Lett. 35, 172–175 (2010). [PubMed]

15.

A. A. Lagatsky, X. Han, M. D. Serrano, C. Cascales, C. Zaldo, S. Calvez, M. D. Dawson, J. A. Gupta, C. T. Brown, and W. Sibbett, “Femtosecond (191 fs) NaY(WO4)2 Tm,Ho-codoped laser at 2060 nm,” Opt. Lett. 35(18), 3027–3029 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

T. R. Schibli, K. Minoshima, H. Kataura, E. Itoga, N. Minami, S. Kazaoui, K. Miyashita, M. Tokumoto, and Y. Sakakibara, “Ultrashort pulse-generation by saturable mirrors based on polymer embedded carbon nanotubes,” Opt. Express 13, 8025–8031 (2005). [PubMed]

17.

A. Schmidt, S. Rivier, W. B. Cho, J. H. Yim, S. Y. Choi, S. Lee, F. Rotermund, D. Rytz, G. Steinmeyer, V. Petrov, and U. Griebner, “Sub-100 fs single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber mode-locked Yb-laser operation near 1 µm,” Opt. Express 17, 20109–20116 (2009). [PubMed]

18.

W. B. Cho, J. H. Yim, S. Y. Choi, S. Lee, A. Schmidt, G. Steinmeyer, U. Griebner, V. Petrov, D.-I. Yeom, K. Kim, and F. Rotermund, “Boosting the nonlinear optical response of carbon nanotube saturable absorbers for broadband mode-locking of bulk lasers,” Adv. Funct. Mater. 20, 1937–1943 (2010).

19.

R. Peters, C. Kränkel, K. Petermann, and G. Huber, “Crystal growth by the heat exchanger method, spectroscopic characterization and laser operation of high purity Yb:Lu2O3,” J. Cryst. Growth 310(7-9), 1934–1938 (2008). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(140.3070) Lasers and laser optics : Infrared and far-infrared lasers
(140.4050) Lasers and laser optics : Mode-locked lasers

ToC Category:
Lasers and Laser Optics

History
Original Manuscript: January 4, 2012
Revised Manuscript: February 8, 2012
Manuscript Accepted: February 8, 2012
Published: February 17, 2012

Citation
Andreas Schmidt, Philipp Koopmann, Günter Huber, Peter Fuhrberg, Sun Young Choi, Dong-Il Yeom, Fabian Rotermund, Valentin Petrov, and Uwe Griebner, "175 fs Tm:Lu2O3 laser at 2.07 µm mode-locked using single-walled carbon nanotubes," Opt. Express 20, 5313-5318 (2012)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-20-5-5313


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References

  1. A. Godard, “Infrared (2–12 μm) solid-state laser sources: a review,” C. R. Phys.8(10), 1100–1128 (2007). [CrossRef]
  2. F. Adler, P. Masłowski, A. Foltynowicz, K. C. Cossel, T. C. Briles, I. Hartl, and J. Ye, “Mid-infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy with a broadband frequency comb,” Opt. Express18(21), 21861–21872 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. A. Härkönen, C. Grebing, J. Paajaste, R. Koskinen, J.-P. Alanko, S. Suomalainen, G. Steinmeyer, and M. Guina, “Modelocked GaSb disk laser producing 384 fs pulses at 2 μm wavelength,” Electron. Lett.47, 454–456 (2011).
  4. L. E. Nelson, E. P. Ippen, and H. A. Haus, “Broadly tunable sub-500 fs pulses from an additive-pulse mode-locked thulium-doped fiber laser,” Appl. Phys. Lett.67, 19–21 (1995). [CrossRef]
  5. R. C. Sharp, D. E. Spock, N. Pan, and J. Elliot, “190-fs passively mode-locked thulium fiber laser with a low threshold,” Opt. Lett.21(12), 881–883 (1996). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. M. Engelbrecht, F. Haxsen, A. Ruehl, D. Wandt, and D. Kracht, “Ultrafast thulium-doped fiber-oscillator with pulse energy of 4.3 nJ,” Opt. Lett.33(7), 690–692 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. P. Koopmann, R. Peters, K. Petermann, and G. Huber, “Crystal growth, spectroscopy, and highly efficient laser operation of thulium-doped Lu2O3 around 2 µm,” Appl. Phys. B102, 19–24 (2011).
  8. P. Koopmann, S. Lamrini, K. Scholle, P. Fuhrberg, K. Petermann, and G. Huber, “Efficient diode-pumped laser operation of Tm:Lu2O3 around 2 μm,” Opt. Lett.36(6), 948–950 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  9. W. B. Cho, A. Schmidt, J. H. Yim, S. Y. Choi, S. Lee, F. Rotermund, U. Griebner, G. Steinmeyer, V. Petrov, X. Mateos, M. C. Pujol, J. J. Carvajal, M. Aguiló, and F. Díaz, “Passive mode-locking of a Tm-doped bulk laser near 2 μm using a carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” Opt. Express17, 11007–11009 (2009). [PubMed]
  10. S. Kivistö, T. Hakulinen, A. Kaskela, B. Aitchison, D. P. Brown, A. G. Nasibulin, E. I. Kauppinen, A. Härkönen, and O. G. Okhotnikov, “Carbon nanotube films for ultrafast broadband technology,” Opt. Express17(4), 2358–2363 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. K. Kieu and F. W. Wise, “Soliton thulium-doped fiber laser with carbon nanotube saturable absorber,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett.21(3), 128–130 (2009). [CrossRef]
  12. F. Fusari, A. A. Lagatsky, G. Jose, S. Calvez, A. Jha, M. D. Dawson, J. A. Gupta, W. Sibbett, and C. T. Brown, “Femtosecond mode-locked Tm(3+) and Tm(3+)-Ho(3+) doped 2 μm glass lasers,” Opt. Express18(21), 22090–22098 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. A. A. Lagatsky, S. Calvez, J. A. Gupta, V. E. Kisel, N. V. Kuleshov, C. T. Brown, M. D. Dawson, and W. Sibbett, “Broadly tunable femtosecond mode-locking in a Tm:KYW laser near 2 μm,” Opt. Express19(10), 9995–10000 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
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