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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 20, Iss. 7 — Mar. 26, 2012
  • pp: 7616–7629
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Design of mid-infrared amplifiers based on fiber taper coupling to erbium-doped microspherical resonator

Luciano Mescia, Pietro Bia, Marco De Sario, Annalisa Di Tommaso, and Francesco Prudenzano  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 20, Issue 7, pp. 7616-7629 (2012)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.20.007616


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Abstract

A dedicated 3D numerical model based on coupled mode theory and solving the rate equations has been developed to analyse, design and optimize an optical amplifier obtained by using a tapered fiber and a Er3+-doped chalcogenide microsphere. The simulation model takes into account the main transitions among the erbium energy levels, the amplified spontaneous emission and the most important secondary transitions pertaining to the ion–ion interactions. The taper angle of the optical fiber and the fiber-microsphere gap have been designed to efficiently inject into the microsphere both the pump and the signal beams and to improve their spatial overlapping with the rare earth doped region. In order to reduce the computational time, a detailed investigation of the amplifier performance has been carried out by changing the number of sectors in which the doped area is partitioned. The simulation results highlight that this scheme could be useful to develop high efficiency and compact mid-infrared amplifiers.

© 2012 OSA

1. Introduction

2. Theory

Fig. 1 Layout scheme of the fiber taper coupled to the Er3+-doped chalcogenide micro-sphere.

The electromagnetic analysis of the microsphere is performed by finding the solution of the scalar Helmholtz equation in spherical coordinates:
1r2sinθ[sinθr(r2ψr)+θ(sinθψθ)+1sinθ2ψφ2]+k2ns2ψ=0
(1)
where k = 2π/λ is the wave vector in vacuum, λ is the wavelength in vacuum and ns is the refractive index of the microsphere. In particular, the polarization direction of the electromagnetic field is considered constant along a fixed spherical coordinate. The solution of Eq. (1) is separable, i.e. ψl,m,n (r,θ) = NsR (r) Θ (θ) Φ (φ); being ψl,m,n = Eθ for the transverse electric (TE) modes, and ψl,m,n = Hθ for the transverse magnetic (TM) modes. Ns is the normalization constant calculated so that the volume integral of ψl,m,n2 over all space, divided by the micro-sphere circumference is equal to unit [13

13. B. E. Little, J. P. Laine, and H. A. Haus, “Analytic Theory of Coupling from Tapered Fibers and Half-Blocks into Microsphere Resonators,” J. Lightwave Technol. 17, 704–715 (1999). [CrossRef]

]. As a consequence, each WGM can be identified by three integers l,m,n where l − m + 1 is the number of field maxima in the polar, θ̂, direction and n is the number of field maxima along the radial direction.

The azimuthal dependence Φ(φ) can be expressed in terms of complex exponential functions depending on the mode number ml. If the sphere radius is larger than the effective wavelength, the WGMs are characterized by large values of m and l. Moreover, the approximation θ ≪ 1 for the polar angle has been considered because the corresponding modes are the most strongly coupled with the tapered fiber. In this case, the polar dependence Θ(θ) can be represented by the Hermite polynomials of order N = l − m. Therefore, the radial solution R(r) can be expressed in terms of spherical Bessel functions depending on the mode orders l and n [13

13. B. E. Little, J. P. Laine, and H. A. Haus, “Analytic Theory of Coupling from Tapered Fibers and Half-Blocks into Microsphere Resonators,” J. Lightwave Technol. 17, 704–715 (1999). [CrossRef]

].

The coupling lifetime τext=1/κ2=mπ/(ωKfs2), where κ is the cavity decay rate, denotes the coupling phenomenon between microsphere and optical fiber. In particular, the coupling coefficient Kfs was calculated according to the overlap integral [13

13. B. E. Little, J. P. Laine, and H. A. Haus, “Analytic Theory of Coupling from Tapered Fibers and Half-Blocks into Microsphere Resonators,” J. Lightwave Technol. 17, 704–715 (1999). [CrossRef]

]
Kfs=Vk2(ns2n02)2βfEfEs*dV
(5)
where Ef is the field of the fundamental mode of the optical fiber and Es is the WGM field of the microsphere. Both the electromagnetic fields are calculated by using the Eqs. (1)(3) and normalizing on the · θ̂ plane such that
0π0+|Ef|2rdrdθ=1
(6)
0π0+|Es|2rdrdθ=1
(7)
In particular, for an adiabatic taper, the fiber radius, a, can be approximated as
a(z)=a0+|z|δ
(8)
where δ is the tapered angle and a0 is the fiber radius at the waist of the tapered fiber, as shown in Fig. 1. As result, the z-depending propagation constant, βf, of the optical fiber mode can be calculated by solving the characteristic equation [13

13. B. E. Little, J. P. Laine, and H. A. Haus, “Analytic Theory of Coupling from Tapered Fibers and Half-Blocks into Microsphere Resonators,” J. Lightwave Technol. 17, 704–715 (1999). [CrossRef]

]
kfJ1[a(z)kf]J0[a(z)kf]=αfK1[a(z)αf]K0[a(z)αf]
(9)
where
kf=k2nf2βf2
(10)
αf=βf2k2n02
(11)
Jυ and Kυ, υ = 0,1, are the Bessel functions of the first kind and the modified Bessel functions of the second kind, respectively.

The interaction of the WGMs with the rare earth doped microsphere has been investigated by using the rate equation model. Figure 2 shows the schematic of six energy manifolds (numbered with |ii = 1,2,...6), the electronic transitions and the energy transfers of the trivalent erbium ions in the chalcogenide glass. The state |6〉 is constituted by the 4S3/2, 2H11/2, 4F7/2 manifolds because the nonradiative transition 4F7/22 H11/2 is very fast, and the 4S3/2 and 2H11/2 are thermally distributed. However, the complex Er3+-ions system was justified by the fact that in the considered chalcogenide glass the lifetime of the 4I13/2, 4I11/2, 4I9/2 energy manifolds are comparable and the lifetime of the 4F9/2 energy manifolds is small but not negligible. In particular, the important energy exchange processes considered in the model are: 1) both 806 nm (4I15/24 I9/2) and 980 nm (4I15/24 I11/2) pump transitions, 2) 4.5 μm (4I9/24 I11/2), 2.7 μm (4I11/24 I13/2) and 1.55 μm (4I13/24 I15/2) stimulated emission transitions, 3) different spontaneous decays (point arrows), 4) various types of energy transfer mechanisms occurring in a pair of Er3+ ions: (4I13/2, 4I13/24 I15/2, 4I9/2), (4I11/2, 4I11/24 I15/2, 4S3/2), (4I9/2, 4I9/24 S3/2, 4I13/2), (4I15/2, 4I9/24 I13/2), (4I15/2, 4S3/24 I13/2, 4I9/2), (4I13/2, 4I9/24 I15/2, 4S3/2).

Fig. 2 Energy level diagram of the Er3+ ions considered in our simulations.

The doped area, in the plane · θ̂ is divided in q sector, as showed in Fig. 3. In particular, Δr and Δθ are the radial and polar dimension of each sector, Sq is the area of the q-th sector, θmax is the maximum polar angle defining the doped area considered in the simulations.

Fig. 3 Discretization of the doped area in the plane r̂ ·θ̂.

The rate equations describing the population dynamic of the |1〉–|6〉 energy manifolds can be written as:
dN1qdt=(W21q+CupN2q+C24N4q+A21)N2q+(C3N3q+A31)N3q+A41N4q+A51N5q+A61N6q+(R13q+R14q+W12q+2C16N6q+C14N4q)N1q
dN2qdt=(W12q+2C16N6q+C14N4q)N1q+(W32q+A32)N3q+(C14N1q+C4N4q+A42)N4q+A52N5q++A62N6q(W21q+C24N4q+2CupN2q+A21)N2q
dN3qdt=R13qN1q+A43N4q+A53N5q+A63N6q(W32q+2C3N3q+A31+A32)N3q
dN4qdt=2C16N1qN6q+Cup(N2q)2(A41+A42+A43+C14N1q+2C4N4q+C24N2q)N4q++A54N5q+A64N6q+R14qN1
dN5qdt=A65N6q(A51+A52+A53+A54)N5q
dN6qdt=C3(N3q)2+C4(N4q)2+C24N2qN4q(A61+A62+A63+A64+A65+2C16N1q)N6q
where Niq i = 1,2,...6 is the concentration of i-th energy manifold in the q-th sector, Rijq is the pump transition rate and Wijq is the signal transition rate in the q-th sector defined as:
Rijq=l,m,nRijq,l,m,n
Wijq=l,m,nWijq,l,m,n
Rijq,l,m,n and Wijq,l,m,n are the contribution to the pump and signal rate of each WGM propagating into the microsphere and they can be calculated as
Rijq,l,m,n=σij(ν˜)hν˜SqSqIl,m,np(r,θ,φ=0,t)rdrdθ
(12)
Wijq,l,m,n=σij(ν˜)hν˜SqSqIl,m,ns(r,θ,φ=0,t)rdrdθ
(13)
where ν̃ = νl,m,n is the WGM resonant frequency, σi,j (ν̃) is the emission cross section at the frequency ν̃, when i > j, and the absorption cross section at the frequency ν̃ when i < j, and (1/Sq) SqIl,m,ns,prdrdθ is the average value, over the doped area Sq, of the intensity profile. In particular, the intensity profile at pump, Il,m,np, and signal, Il,m,ns, frequency can be formulated in terms of electric field by [15

15. C. L. Zou, Y. Yang, C. H. Dong, Y. F. Xiao, X. W. Wu, Z. F. Han, and G. C. Guo, “Taper-microsphere coupling with numerical calculation of coupled-mode theory,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25, 1895–1898 (2008). [CrossRef]

]:
Il,m,na(r,θ,φ,t)=12ɛ0cneff(ν˜)|Al,m,na(φ,t)|2|El,m,na(r,θ)|2with a=p,s
(14)
Al,m,nq(φ,t) is the slowly varying amplitude and El,m,na(r,θ) is the normalized electric field on the plane r̂ · θ̂. Thus, the Eqs. (12)(13) can be written as
Rijq,l,m,n=σij(ν˜)2ν˜hSqɛ0cneff(ν˜)|Al,m,np(φ=0,t)|2Γl,m,nq,p
(15)
Wijq,l,m,n=σij(ν˜)2ν˜hSqɛ0cneff(ν˜)|Al,m,ns(φ=0,t)|2Γl,m,nq,s
(16)
where
Γl,m,nq,a=Sq|El,m,nq(r,θ)|2rdrdθwitha=p,s
(17)
is the overlap factor of each WGM with the rare-earth profile in the q-th sector. The condition φ= 0 in Eqs. (15)(16) is used by considering that the azimuthal dependence of the electromagnetic field takes the form exp(−jmφ).

Since the obtained differential Eqs. (18) are of the same kind of the equation (4), a term concerning the light-matter interaction can be added to obtain:
dAl,m,npdt=12(1τext+1τ0gl,m,np2iΔω)Al,m,np+i1τextτAin,l,m,npdAl,m,nsdt=12(1τext+1τ0gl,m,ns2iΔω)Al,m,ns+c2neffqNjqσji(ν˜)Γl,m,nq,sA0++i1τextτAin,l,m,ns
(19)
where the term
gl,m,nq=cneff(qNjqσji(ν˜)Γl,m,nq,aqNiqσij(ν˜)Γl,m,nq,a)with a=p,s
(20)
arises from the interaction of both the optical pump and the signal to be amplified with Er3+ ions. In particular, if the laser action occurs gl,m,np<0 describes the decay of the pump energy and gl,m,ns>0 quantifies the energy improvement of the WGM. Finally, the overall transmittance can be expressed by the equation [18

18. K. Vahala, Optical Microcavities (World Scientific Publishing, 2004). [CrossRef]

]
T=|Aout,l,m,naAin,l,m,na|2=|1ττext+iττextAl,m,naAin,l,m,na|witha=p,s
(21)
where the resonance character of the transmittance becomes apparent when the dependence of τ, τext, Al,m,na and Ain,l,m,na on the WGM resonance frequency ν̃ is considered.

3. Numerical results

The numerical investigation is aimed to the evaluation of Ga5Ge20Sb10S65 chalcogenide glass feasibility for the construction of microsphere amplifiers operating in the mid-infrared wavelength range. In order to carry out a realistic design, the simulations have been performed by taking into account the refractive index wavelength dispersion [12

12. F. Prudenzano, L. Mescia, L. Allegretti, V. Moizan, V. Nazabal, and F. Smektala, “Theoretical study of cascade laser in erbium-doped chalcogenide glass fibers,” Opt. Mat. 33, 241–245 (2010). [CrossRef]

] and the spectroscopic parameter summarized in Table 1. Moreover, a very short lifetime (10−6 s) of the state |6〉 and transition rates A61 = A62 = A63 = A64 = 0 have been considered in the calculations.

Table 1. Spectroscopic parameters of the Er3+-doped chalcogenide microsphere.

table-icon
View This Table

In order to overcome the limitations due to the dense optical spectrum of WGMs, a quite small microsphere has been considered. Figure 4 shows the transmission characteristic around (a) pump wavelength λp = 0.98 μm and (b) signal wavelength λs = 2.76 μm, of the undoped microsphere coupled with the tapered fiber by considering sphere radius R0 = 25 μm and taper-microsphere gap d = 460 nm, at the pump wavelength, and d = 1.8 μm, at the signal wavelength. The different values of d have been chosen to obtain the critical coupling condition at both wavelengths. The size of the fiber taper has been designed to ensure the fundamental mode propagation along the waveguide formed by the fiber waist surrounded by air, and to have a significant evanescent field into the space surrounding the taper. In particular, the considered waist radius and taper angle numerical values are a0 = 700 nm and δ = 0.03 rad, respectively.

Fig. 4 Transmission spectrum of the undoped microsphere, having radius R0 = 25 μm, around (a) pump wavelength λp = 0.98 μm and (b) signal wavelength λs = 2.76 μm.

The main aspect of the numerical simulation pertains to the suitable choice of the sector number q ensuring a good compromise between the result accuracy and the computational time. Figure 5 summarizes the obtained results regarding the variation of the signal transmittance versus the sector number for different maximum polar angles, θmax. In the simulations, the thickness of the erbium-doped region and erbium concentration are s = 3 μm and NEr = 0.5 w%, respectively. Other parameters are: input pump power Pp = 100 mW, input signal power Ps = −50 dBm, taper angle δ = 0.03 rad, taper-microsphere gap d = 560 nm, waist radius a0 = 700 nm. It can be observed that for sectors number higher than 80, the transmittance is almost constant even by increasing θmax. This occurrence can be explained by considering that, for small θmax, only a part of the power distribution is taken into account in the calculation of the gain. By increasing θmax, the tails of the electromagnetic field along the polar direction are also considered for the signal amplification. For θmax > π/10 and q > 80, the transmittance slightly changes because the electromagnetic field distribution of the fundamental WGM on the · θ̂ plane is almost completely considered in the calculations. Significant transmittance variation can be observed for θmax > π/5 and q < 80 because a poor sampling of the electromagnetic field occurs. However, we have selected θmax = π/10 and q = 30 since the obtained signal transmittance is practically equal to that calculated for θmax = π/5 and q > 80.

Fig. 5 Signal transmittance versus the number of the sector q for different maximum polar angles: θmax = π/5 rad (full curve), θmax = π/10 rad (dash curve), θmax = π/20 rad (dash-dot curve) and θmax = π/30 rad (dot curve).

The variation of the amplifier characteristics due to the changes of the erbium-doped region thickness has been investigated, too. Figure 6 shows the dependence of the signal transmittance as a function of doped region thickness for different maximum polar angles. Other parameters used in the computation are: input pump power Pp = 100 mW, input signal power Ps = −50 dBm, taper angle δ = 0.03 rad, taper-microsphere gap d = 560 nm, erbium concentration NEr = 0.5 w%, waist radius a0 = 700 nm. In all the investigated cases, the transmittance increases by increasing the thickness s of the doped region because a better overlap between WGM electromagnetic field profile and the region containing the erbium ions occurs. For thicknesses of the doped region higher than 2 μm the transmittance is quite constant because the WGM field intensity at both pump and signal wavelengths are bounded in a spatial region enclosed in s < 2 μm. Nevertheless, the transmittance increases by increasing the maximum polar angles θmax till θmax > π/10. The curves θmax = π/5 and θmax = π/10 are practically unnoticeable.

Fig. 6 Signal transmittance versus the thickness of the doped region s for different maximum polar angles: θmax = π/5 rad (full curve), θmax = π/10 rad (dash curve), θmax = π/20 rad (dash-dot curve) and θmax = π/30 rad (dot curve).

Figure 7 depicts the transmittance as a function of maximum polar angle θmax for three different doped region thicknesses, s=1,2,3 μm. As expected, for θmax > 0.2 rad the signal transmittance slightly changes by changing the thickness of the doped region. Thus, according with the aforesaid remarks, the sector number q = 30, maximum polar angle θmax = π/10 rad, thickness of the doped region s=3 μm, sphere radius R0 = 25 μm are fixed in the following simulations, allowing to obtain a good result precision without too much computational time consumption.

Fig. 7 Signal transmittance versus the maximum polar angle for different thicknesses of the doped region: s=3 μm (full curve), s=2 μm (dash curve), and s=1 μm (dot curve).

The performance of the gain-functionalized microsphere depends on the coupling strength between fiber modes and WGMs and it exhibits different behavior for the under-coupling, over-coupling and critical coupling conditions. In particular, an efficient coupling can be obtained if significant overlap and phase-matching (phase synchronism) between the propagation constant of WGM and the propagation constant of the fundamental taper mode is fulfilled, as well as the frequency of the excitation is resonant with the WGM frequency. To this aim, the taper angle, the fiber radius and the fiber-microsphere gap have been tailored in order to efficiently couple the pump beam into the rare earth-doped microsphere and to enhance the extraction of the amplified signal from the microsphere. Figure 8 shows the transmittance versus the fibre-microsphere gap for different erbium concentration, with taper angle δ = 0.03 rad and input pump power Pp = 100 mW. The transmittance (marked curves) at both pump and signal wavelengths for the undoped sphere are reported for a comparison. Good signal amplification is obtained for a fibre-microsphere gap close to 500 nm where the condition of critical coupling at the pump wavelength occurs. In fact, in this operational regime the most part of the pump signal is coupled into the microsphere. As result, a strong pump absorption rate occurs, the erbium ions are inverted and the signal stimulated emission rate takes place. It can be also observed that the amplifier performance depends on the erbium concentration. When the fiber is very close to the microsphere (d≅200 nm) both the pump and signal to be amplified are in a regime where the coupling is stronger than the loss (over-coupling). In this condition, the energy circulating in the microsphere poorly interacts with the active ions because a large portion of its is coupled out to the fiber. By increasing the gap up to about 550 nm the pump signal circulating in the microsphere is high enough to ensure a strong population inversion whose value mainly depends on erbium concentration. In under-coupling regime (d>550 nm) only a small part of input pump power is coupled in the microsphere. As result, the reduction of the population inversion due to the ion-ion interaction becomes stronger at higher erbium concentration causing a decreasing of the amplifier performance. Finally, for large gap values the signal amplifica-tion cannot be fulfilled because the pump signal in the microsphere is too much low. Figure 9 shows the signal transmittance versus the fibre-microsphere gap for three different taper angles, erbium concentration NEr = 0.5 w%, input pump and signal power Pp(0) = 100 mW and Ps(0) = −50 dBm, respectively. It can be observed that quite similar performance in terms of maximum signal amplification are obtained.

Fig. 8 Transmittance versus the fibre-microsphere gap for different erbium concentrations: NEr = 0.5 w% (full curve), NEr = 0.3 w% (dash curve), and NEr = 0.1 w% (dot curve); transmittance of the undoped microsphere at pump wavelength (square mark) and at signal wavelength (circular mark).
Fig. 9 Signal transmittance versus the fibre-microsphere gap for different taper angles: δ = 0.01 rad (full curve), δ = 0.02 rad (dash curve), and δ = 0.03 rad (dot curve).

The effect of the pump power on the gain performance is an important issue for the micro-sphere amplifier. To this aim, Fig. 10 illustrates the transmittance as a function of the input pump power for three different input signal powers. In all the cases, the transmittance linearly increases by increasing the pump power up to a threshold value depending on input signal power: ≈ 67 mW for Ps = −30 dBm, ≈ 78 mW for Ps = −40 dBm and Ps = −50 dBm. In fact, for input pump power lower than the threshold one the absorption and the stimulated emission rates due to the internal cavity field at the pump and signal wavelength respectively, induce a weak population improvement of the 4I11/2 energy manifold. The different values of the threshold pump power can be explained by taking into account the upconversion phenomena from 4I13/2 and 4I11/2 energy manifolds. In fact, with lower signal power the ion population of the 4I11/2 energy manifold is quite high and the upconversion is more efficient. At the same time, the ion population of the 4I13/2 energy manifold is not high enough to compensate the deleterious effect of the upconversion from the 4I11/2 energy manifold. As result, in order to fully invert the active medium higher pump power is required. On the contrary, for input pump powers higher than the threshold one the population of the 4I11/2 energy manifold steeply increases and a strong population inversion occurs. Finally, for input pump power higher than 85 mW the transmittance is, in all the three cases, quite constant because this regime corresponds to a fully inverted medium. Moreover, as expected, the transmittance value decreases by increasing the input signal power, because the gain saturation due to the amplified signal occurs.

Fig. 10 Signal transmittance versus the pump power for different input signal powers: Ps = −50 dBm (full curve), Ps = −40 dBm (dash curve), and Ps = −30 dBm (dot curve).

Finally, Fig. 11 shows the simulation of the signal transmittance versus the time by considering a constant input signal power, Ps = −50 dBm, and for three different input pump powers. With respect to the steady operation an overshoot is observed which is narrowed by increasing the input pump power. The delay time of the peak corresponding to the lower input pump power is due to a slower dynamic of the absorption pump rate. Moreover, the absence of the spike for Pp = 50 mW can be explained by considering that the pump absorption and stimulated emission rates grow in the same way during the time. The obtained numerical results show that the time constants of the transient gain dynamic depend on the input pump power and, the saturation and recovery times are typically less than few ms.

Fig. 11 Signal transmittance versus the time for different input pump powers: Pp = 200 mW (full curve), Pp = 100 mW (dash curve), and Pp = 50 mW (dot curve).

In order to evaluate the effects of the lasing action on the amplifier performance some simulations have been performed by using over 120 WGMs in the wavelength band from 2740 nm to 2780 nm. A laser threshold of about 60 mW and a negligible power of the higher order WGMs have been calculated for input pump power lower than 120 mW. Moreover, higher input pump power can activate the laser action of the high order WGMs in the signal wavelength band without drastically reduce the gain at the signal frequency (n=1, m=l=118).

The proposed device is feasible also with reference to the temperature variation, due to the pump power, lower than 50 °C. In fact, by considering typical values of the thermal expansion coefficient (CTE=14.4×10−6 °C−1) and thermal refraction coefficients (dns/dT=10−5 °C−1) of chalcogenide glasses [20

20. J. S. Sanghera and I. D. Aggarwal, “Active and passive chalcogenide glass optical fibers for IR applications: a review,” J. Non-Crystalline Sol. 256–257,6–16 (1999). [CrossRef]

], a red shift of the pump and signal resonance frequencies of about 0.2 nm and 0.5 nm, respectively, has been calculated for a temperature improvement of 50 °C. These red shifts slowly change the output power at the signal wavelength.

4. Conclusion

In this paper, we have reported an extremely accurate design of Er3+-doped chalcogenide microsphere amplifier evanescently coupled with a tapered optical fiber. The device performance has been investigated by changing the fiber-microsphere gap, the thickness of erbium doped region, the fiber taper angle, the erbium concentration and the operative parameters such as pump and signal power. A dedicated 3D model based on coupled mode theory and solving the rate equations has been developed and implemented in a home-made computer code. The electromagnetic analysis of the microsphere has been performed by finding the solution of the scalar Helmholtz equation in spherical coordinates. Moreover, peculiar parameters as quality factor and coupling coefficients have been evaluated by considering the calculated electromagnetic field profile of both microsphere and tapered optical fiber. A detailed analysis pertaining to the simulation accuracy has been performed by changing the amplitude of the computational domain and the number of the discretization points. In particular, sector number q=30 and maximum polar angle θmax = π/10 rad ensure good result precision and not too much computational time consuming. A significant signal amplification can be obtained for input pump powers higher than 80 mW and, in the small signal operation, maximum optical gain of about 7 dB has been calculated. The performed simulations indicate that the proposed Er3+-doped microspheres are good candidates for an efficient frequency-selective amplification, e.g. to restore signal attenuation and to be employed for compact integration of the active optical functionalities.

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M. L. Gorodetsky and V. S. Ilchenko, “Optical microsphere resonators: optimal coupling to high-Q whispering-gallery modes” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 16, 147–154 (1999). [CrossRef]

15.

C. L. Zou, Y. Yang, C. H. Dong, Y. F. Xiao, X. W. Wu, Z. F. Han, and G. C. Guo, “Taper-microsphere coupling with numerical calculation of coupled-mode theory,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25, 1895–1898 (2008). [CrossRef]

16.

H. A. Haus, Waves and Fields in Optoelectronics (Prentice Hall Inc., 1984).

17.

M. J. F. Digonnet, Rare-Earth-Doper Fider Lasers and Amplifiers (Marcel Dekker Inc., 2001). [CrossRef]

18.

K. Vahala, Optical Microcavities (World Scientific Publishing, 2004). [CrossRef]

19.

A. W. Snyder and J. D. Love, Optical Waveguide Theory (Chapman and Hall, 1988).

20.

J. S. Sanghera and I. D. Aggarwal, “Active and passive chalcogenide glass optical fibers for IR applications: a review,” J. Non-Crystalline Sol. 256–257,6–16 (1999). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(140.4480) Lasers and laser optics : Optical amplifiers
(230.5750) Optical devices : Resonators

ToC Category:
Lasers and Laser Optics

History
Original Manuscript: December 22, 2011
Revised Manuscript: February 16, 2012
Manuscript Accepted: February 21, 2012
Published: March 20, 2012

Citation
Luciano Mescia, Pietro Bia, Marco De Sario, Annalisa Di Tommaso, and Francesco Prudenzano, "Design of mid-infrared amplifiers based on fiber taper coupling to erbium-doped microspherical resonator," Opt. Express 20, 7616-7629 (2012)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-20-7-7616


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References

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  5. S. Y. Chen, T. Sun, K. T. V. Grattan, K. Annapurna, R. Sen, “Characteristics of Er and ErYbCr doped phosphate microsphere fibre lasers,” Opt. Commun. 282, 3765–3769 (2009). [CrossRef]
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  7. G. Nunzi Conti, A. Chiasera, L. Ghisa, S. Berneschi, M. Brenci, Y. Dumeige, S. Pelli, S. Sebastiani, P. Feron, M. Ferrari, G. C. Righini, “Spectroscopic and lasing properties of Er3+ doped glass microspheres,” J. Non-Crystalline Sol. 352, 2360–2363 (2006). [CrossRef]
  8. G. R. Elliot, D. W. Hewak, G. Senthil Murugan, J. S. Wilkinson, “Chalcogenide glass microspheres; their production, characterization and potential,” Opt. Express 15, 17542–17553 (2007). [CrossRef]
  9. L. Mescia, F. Prudenzano, M. De Sario, T. Palmisano, M. Ferrari, G. C. Righini, “Design of Rare-Earth-Doped Microspheres,” IEEE Photon. Techonol. Lett. 22, 422–424 (2010). [CrossRef]
  10. T. Kouki, T. Makoto, “Optical microsphere amplification system,” Opt. Lett. 32, 3197–3199 (2007). [CrossRef]
  11. Y. G. Boucher, P. Feron, “Generalized transfer function: A simple model applied to active single-mode microring resonators,” Opt. Commun. 282, 3940–3947 (2009). [CrossRef]
  12. F. Prudenzano, L. Mescia, L. Allegretti, V. Moizan, V. Nazabal, F. Smektala, “Theoretical study of cascade laser in erbium-doped chalcogenide glass fibers,” Opt. Mat. 33, 241–245 (2010). [CrossRef]
  13. B. E. Little, J. P. Laine, H. A. Haus, “Analytic Theory of Coupling from Tapered Fibers and Half-Blocks into Microsphere Resonators,” J. Lightwave Technol. 17, 704–715 (1999). [CrossRef]
  14. M. L. Gorodetsky, V. S. Ilchenko, “Optical microsphere resonators: optimal coupling to high-Q whispering-gallery modes” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 16, 147–154 (1999). [CrossRef]
  15. C. L. Zou, Y. Yang, C. H. Dong, Y. F. Xiao, X. W. Wu, Z. F. Han, G. C. Guo, “Taper-microsphere coupling with numerical calculation of coupled-mode theory,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25, 1895–1898 (2008). [CrossRef]
  16. H. A. Haus, Waves and Fields in Optoelectronics (Prentice Hall Inc., 1984).
  17. M. J. F. Digonnet, Rare-Earth-Doper Fider Lasers and Amplifiers (Marcel Dekker Inc., 2001). [CrossRef]
  18. K. Vahala, Optical Microcavities (World Scientific Publishing, 2004). [CrossRef]
  19. A. W. Snyder, J. D. Love, Optical Waveguide Theory (Chapman and Hall, 1988).
  20. J. S. Sanghera, I. D. Aggarwal, “Active and passive chalcogenide glass optical fibers for IR applications: a review,” J. Non-Crystalline Sol. 256–257,6–16 (1999). [CrossRef]

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