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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 20, Iss. 9 — Apr. 23, 2012
  • pp: 9351–9356
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A 2.5 ns switching time Mach­Zehnder modulator in as-deposited a-Si:H

Sandro Rao, Giuseppe Coppola, Mariano A. Gioffrè, and Francesco G. Della Corte  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 20, Issue 9, pp. 9351-9356 (2012)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.20.009351


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Abstract

A very simple and fast Mach­Zehnder electro-optic modulator based on a p-i-n configuration, operating at λ = 1.55 μm, has been fabricated at 170°C using the low cost technology of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). In spite of the device simplicity, refractive index modulation was achieved through the free carrier dispersion effect resulting in characteristic rise and fall times of ~2.5 ns. By reverse biasing the p-i-n device, the voltage-length product was estimated to be Vπ∙Lπ = 40 V⋅cm both from static and dynamic measurements. Such bandwidth performance in as-deposited a-Si:H demonstrates the potential of this material for the fabrication of fast active photonic devices integrated on standard microelectronic substrates.

© 2012 OSA

1. Introduction

One critical device for on-chip photonics circuits (PC) is a high-speed waveguide-integrated electro-optic modulator, which converts data from the electrical to the optical domain. Beside the tens of Gbps devices [4

4. D. J. Thomson, F. Y. Gardes, Y. Hu, G. Mashanovich, M. Fournier, P. Grosse, J.-M. Fedeli, and G. T. Reed, “High contrast 40Gbit/s optical modulation in silicon,” Opt. Express 19(12), 11507–11516 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], necessary for addressing the data exchange bottleneck at chip level, plenty of opportunities also exist for Gbps ones, such as for fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) terminal units and routers, or remote sensors.

To date, a definitively prevailing technology for the integration of photonic components on a CMOS platform is still to emerge. Crystalline silicon (c-Si)-based photonic devices require a high thermal budget and not truly standard fabrication processes. In contrast, non-crystalline forms of silicon, such as polycrystalline (poly-Si) and amorphous silicon (a-Si), can be deposited yielding low cost and flexible fabrication. Recently, experimental results have been reported of direct electrical and all-optical modulation [5

5. K. Preston, S. Manipatruni, A. Gondarenko, C. B. Poitras, and M. Lipson, “Deposited silicon high-speed integrated electro-optic modulator,” Opt. Express 17(7), 5118–5124 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7

7. K. Preston, P. Dong, B. Schmidt, and M. Lipson, “High-speed all-optical modulation using polycrystalline silicon microring resonators,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 92(15), 151104 (2008). [CrossRef]

], at the communication wavelengths, in poly-Si-based thin-film devices. However, poly-Si waveguides introduce high optical losses from scattering at the grain boundaries and the involved thermal crystallization temperature (~1100°C), necessary to maximize the optical and electronic material properties, is above the suggested limit of 450°C set for back-end integration. Near-UV laser pulses were therefore used to locally melt and crystallize a top layer of poly-Si at 400°C [8

8. K. Preston, C. B. Poitras, M. Thompson, and M. Lipson, “Photonic devices in low-temperature laser-crystallized deposited silicon,” in Proceedings of Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) and Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference (QELS) (2010).

], but no active devices have been realized with it yet. On the other hand, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), deposited using low temperature (120-300°C) Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) technique, seems useful for realizing minimally-invasive on-chip passive [8

8. K. Preston, C. B. Poitras, M. Thompson, and M. Lipson, “Photonic devices in low-temperature laser-crystallized deposited silicon,” in Proceedings of Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) and Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference (QELS) (2010).

11

11. S. K. Selvaraja, E. Sleeckx, M. Schaekers, W. Bogaerts, D. V. Thourhout, P. Dumon, and R. Baets, “Low-loss amorphous silicon-on-insulator technology for photonic integrated circuitry,” Opt. Commun. 282(9), 1767–1770 (2009). [CrossRef]

] and active [9

9. G. Cocorullo, F. G. Della Corte, R. De Rosa, I. Rendina, A. Rubino, and E. Terzini, “Amorphous silicon-based guided-wave passive and active devices for silicon integrated optoelectronics,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 4(6), 997–1002 (1998). [CrossRef]

,12

12. K. Narayanan, A. W. Elshaari, and S. F. Preble, “Broadband all-optical modulation in hydrogenated-amorphous silicon waveguides,” Opt. Express 18(10), 9809–9814 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14

14. S. Rao, F. G. Della Corte, C. Summonte, and F. Suriano, “Electro-optical modulating device based on a CMOS-compatible a-Si:H/a-SiCN multistack waveguide,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 16(1), 173–178 (2010). [CrossRef]

] devices by depositing vertically stacked layers. Broadband all-optical modulation has recently been reported in as-deposited a-Si:H [15

15. K. Narayanan, A. W. Elshaari, and S. F. Preble, “Broadband all-optical modulation in hydrogenated-amorphous silicon waveguides,” Opt. Express 18(10), 9809–9814 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], exploiting the free carrier absorption effect (Δα) by a pump-probe technique, demonstrating carrier recombination time, in a-Si:H nano-sized waveguides, comparable to that of c-Si.

In a more recent paper [16

16. F. G. Della Corte, S. Rao, G. Coppola, and C. Summonte, “Electro-optical modulation at 1550 nm in an as-deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n waveguiding device,” Opt. Express 19(4), 2941–2951 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], we have shown the first experimental results of an effective refractive index variation (Δneff) obtained by an electrically induced carrier depletion in a-Si:H-based p-i-n waveguiding device deposited at a maximum temperature of 170°C. Characteristic switch-on and switch-off times of ~14 ns were measured in Fabry-Perot (FP) resonators allowing a modulation rate of ~30 MHz, the highest value ever reported for waveguide-integrated electrically driven a-Si:H-based optical devices.In this paper we report experimental results obtained in an improved device, namely a Mach­Zehnder interferometer (MZI), where phase shift is induced by carrier depletion in an optimized p-i-n diode embedded in the a-Si:H rib waveguides forming the arms of the MZI. By reverse biasing the device, we induce a very fast modulation of the space charge volume that, in turn, modifies the refractive index profile of the waveguide and therefore the optical phase of the 1.55 μm wavelength light passing through it.

2. Device structure and fabrication

The schematic layout of the realized modulator is shown in Fig. 1(a)
Fig. 1 (a) Top view of the MZI a-Si:H-based modulator. (b) SEM image of the splitting region. (c) SEM cross-sectional view of the fabricated rib waveguide phase shifter. The optical mode propagates along the z direction.
together with its geometrical dimensions. The device consists of a W = 6 μm input rib-waveguide that is in-tapered over a distance of 1 mm to a W = 4 μm single-mode rib-waveguide. Input-output S-bent curved waveguides, 2050 μm-long, were used to split and combine the optical beam. The S-bent radius of curvature and the intersecting angle of 1.4° result from parametrical optical simulation [17

17. RSoft Photonics CAD Layout User Guide, Rsoft Design Group, Inc. Physical Layer Division, 200 Executive Blvd. Ossining, NY 10562.

] in order to achieve a trade-off between the need for a compact device and low insertion losses. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of the splitting region is shown in Fig. 1(b).

The distance between the two parallel waveguides, 1.3 cm-long, is 50 μm while the overall device length is about 1.86 cm. In Fig. 2(a)
Fig. 2 Schematic cross-section of the realised rib waveguides (a), refractive index profile (b) along the vertical direction, and TE (c) and TM (d) simulated fundamental optical modes in the <x,y> plane. Parametric beam propagation method (BPM) simulations allowed to design a single-mode, birefringence-free, waveguide-integrated p-i-n device.
we report the schematic cross section of the rib-waveguide (W = 4 μm), which consists of a p-i-n structure made of a 2 μm-thick a-Si:H undoped core region between a p-doped a-SiC:H bottom cladding (2 μm-thick) and an n-doped a-SiC:H top layer (300 nm-thick). The substrate is a p-doped Silicon wafer, 300 μm thick.

The simulated fundamental TE0 and TM0 mode-field profiles supported by the structure are shown in Fig. 2(c) and Fig. 2(d). The simulations show that it is birefringence free and single mode for wavelengths between 1.51 and 1.6 μm. The calculated losses are 3.66 dB/cm and 4.06 dB/cm respectively, with and without an aluminum (Al) top contact (Al refractive index = 1.57 + i15.6 at λ = 1.55 μm), in agreement with the experimental results.

To ensure an easy back-end integration with CMOS, we decided to avoid an SiO2 under-cladding layer, and therefore the p-i-n waveguides were fabricated at low temperature (TMAX = 170°C) directly on the p-doped c-Si substrate by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) in an MVSystems reactor. The measured fundamental optical and electrical material parameters are listed in Table 1

Table 1. Fundamental Electrical and Optical Parameters Measured at λ = 1.55 μm

table-icon
View This Table
.

3. Experimental results and discussion

The W = 4 μm (6 μm)-wide rib waveguides were patterned by photolithography and etched to a depth of 520 nm by a reactive ion etching (RIE). One arm of the MZ modulator was covered by a 100 nm-thick evaporated Al film to ensure a good ohmic contact.

We have tested the behavior of the waveguide-integrated MZI by performing both DC and AC measurements. In our set-up a TE-polarized light beam from a 25 mW tunable laser-diode was coupled via a lensed fiber focused onto the input facet of the tapered waveguide, and the output light signal was collected by a single-mode fiber and detected by a high speed InGaAs photodiode. Light intensity is modulated by the phase shift induced in one arm of the interferometer by free carrier depletion in the p-i-n junction. The optical transmission of the MZI was scanned over a wavelength range of 2 nm between 1549 nm and 1551 nm. At each wavelength, a DC reverse bias between 0 V and 60 V, in steps of 1 V, was applied to the phase shifter between the top Al contact and the substrate. We measured modulation depths, defined as (Imax-Imin)/Imax, where Imax and Imin are the maximum and minimum transmitted signals respectively, of 14%. The figure of merit Vπ∙Lπ (the voltage required to achieve a π phase shift for a given length) was extracted from the transmission vs. reverse voltage plot. Figure 3
Fig. 3 Normalized optical transmission vs. DC voltage for the 1.3 cm-long arm a-Si:H MZ modulator. The required voltage to achieve a π phase shift is ~31 V.
shows the normalized optical transmission as a function of the bias level from which we calculated a static Vπ∙Lπ product of ~40 V∙cm.

The on-chip insertion loss was ~18 ± 1 dB when the MZI is in the “ON” state, including ~4 dB of coupling losses at the tapered input. However, it is common to place contact metal aside of the rib, far from the optical field, in order to cut these high absorption losses [4

4. D. J. Thomson, F. Y. Gardes, Y. Hu, G. Mashanovich, M. Fournier, P. Grosse, J.-M. Fedeli, and G. T. Reed, “High contrast 40Gbit/s optical modulation in silicon,” Opt. Express 19(12), 11507–11516 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. We also measured the fiber-to-fiber losses of a straight p-i-n rib waveguide (W = 4 μm) to evaluate the propagation losses, estimating a value of about 4.3 ± 0.2 dB/cm. For the considered branch angle (1.4°), the loss due to leakage from the splitting action is about 1.2 dB as estimated by optical simulations.

The speed performance of the reported vertical p-i-n depletion modulator was analyzed by applying to one arm of the MZI a pulsed signal (Agilent 8114A) with frequency f = 10 MHz, rise (fall) time of ~2 ns, and adjustable peak amplitude Vp. High-frequency electrical micro probe-heads were used to deliver the pulses to the device.

The detected modulated signal was sent to an electrical spectrum analyzer, for an easy tracking of the modulation amplitude, and to a 2 GHz bandwidth oscilloscope, allowing for the measurement of the characteristic rise and fall times which set the limit to the maximum modulation speed. In Fig. 4
Fig. 4 Modulated electrical signal amplitude at the photodiode output for a 31 Vp (corresponding to Vπ) pulses, duty-cycle 20%. The measured rise and fall times (20%-80%) are ~2.3 ns and the modulation depth is 14%. The oscilloscope timescale is 20 ns/div.
we show an optical pattern obtained for pulses with an amplitude of Vp = 31 V, applied to the 1.3 cm-long MZI arm. The maximum observed modulation depth is again approximately 14%, as already observed in DC measurements.

It is worth noting that the large pulse amplitude (~31 V) required for achieving a Δϕ = π is strongly dependent on the waveguide thickness (H = 4.3 μm), dictated in turn by the target of limiting the coupling losses. In an optimized setup, the thickness could be easily reduced allowing a reduction of the pulse amplitude (Vp) that we estimated of a factor of 10 in a 400 nm waveguide [16

16. F. G. Della Corte, S. Rao, G. Coppola, and C. Summonte, “Electro-optical modulation at 1550 nm in an as-deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n waveguiding device,” Opt. Express 19(4), 2941–2951 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Moreover, higher doping concentration can lead to higher index change, but with higher loss due to the free carrier absorption. Therefore careful engineering of the material parameters is critical to enable acceptable optical loss while improving the figure of merit Vπ∙Lπ.

Polarization-dependence measurements demonstrated comparable phase modulation efficiency for TM polarization.

4. Conclusion

We have demonstrated a fast and effective electro-optical modulation at λ = 1.55 μm in a p-i-n waveguiding, birefringence-free structure, based on the CMOS-compatible technology of a-Si:H. The MZ interferometric device was easily fabricated on a c-Si wafer without the deposition of a thick oxide layer at the bottom for shielding the waveguide from the substrate, and the maximum temperature during the PECVD process was as low as 170°C. The effective refractive index variation was measured in both static and dynamic conditions. The voltage-length product for inducing a phase variation Δϕ = π in one arm of the MZI was measured to be Vπ⋅Lπ = 40 V∙cm. Switching times of 2.3 ns have been measured.

Acknowledgments

The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 224312 HELIOS.

References and links

1.

L. C. Kimerling, D. Ahn, M. Beals, C.-Y. Hong, J. Liu, J. Michel, D. Pan, and D. K. Sparacin, “Electronic-photonic integrated circuits on the CMOS platform,” Proc. SPIE 6125, 612502, 612502-10 (2006). [CrossRef]

2.

T. Pinguet, B. Analui, E. Balmater, D. Guckenberger, M. Harrison, R. Koumans, D. Kucharski, Y. Liang, G. Masini, A. Mekis, S. Mirsaidi, A. Narasimha, M. Peterson, D. Rines, V. Sadagopan, S. Sahni, T. J. Sleboda, D. Song, Y. Wang, B. Welch, J. Witzens, J. Yao, S. Abdalla, S. Gloeckner, and P. De Dobbelaer, “Monolithically Integrated High-Speed CMOS Photonic Transceivers,” in Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Group IV Photonics, 5th International Conference (2008).

3.

J. M. Fedeli, L. Di Cioccio, D. Marris-Morini, L. Vivien, R. Orobtchouk, P. Rojo-Romeo, C. Seassal, and F. Mandorlo, “Development of silicon photonics devices using microelectronic tools for the integration on top of a CMOS wafer,” Adv. Opt. Technol. 2008, 1–15 (2008). [CrossRef]

4.

D. J. Thomson, F. Y. Gardes, Y. Hu, G. Mashanovich, M. Fournier, P. Grosse, J.-M. Fedeli, and G. T. Reed, “High contrast 40Gbit/s optical modulation in silicon,” Opt. Express 19(12), 11507–11516 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

K. Preston, S. Manipatruni, A. Gondarenko, C. B. Poitras, and M. Lipson, “Deposited silicon high-speed integrated electro-optic modulator,” Opt. Express 17(7), 5118–5124 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

K. Lee, D. J. Shin, H. Ji, K. Na, S. G. Kim, J. Bok, Y. You, S. Kim, I. Joe, S. D. Suh, J. Pyo, Y. Shin, K. Ha, Y. D. Park, and C. H. Chung, “10Gb/s Silicon Modulator Based on Bulk-Silicon Platform for DRAM Optical Interface,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2011), paper JThA033.

7.

K. Preston, P. Dong, B. Schmidt, and M. Lipson, “High-speed all-optical modulation using polycrystalline silicon microring resonators,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 92(15), 151104 (2008). [CrossRef]

8.

K. Preston, C. B. Poitras, M. Thompson, and M. Lipson, “Photonic devices in low-temperature laser-crystallized deposited silicon,” in Proceedings of Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) and Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference (QELS) (2010).

9.

G. Cocorullo, F. G. Della Corte, R. De Rosa, I. Rendina, A. Rubino, and E. Terzini, “Amorphous silicon-based guided-wave passive and active devices for silicon integrated optoelectronics,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 4(6), 997–1002 (1998). [CrossRef]

10.

A. Harke, M. Krause, and J. Mueller, “Low-loss single mode amorphous silicon waveguides,” Electron. Lett. 41(25), 1377–1378 (2005). [CrossRef]

11.

S. K. Selvaraja, E. Sleeckx, M. Schaekers, W. Bogaerts, D. V. Thourhout, P. Dumon, and R. Baets, “Low-loss amorphous silicon-on-insulator technology for photonic integrated circuitry,” Opt. Commun. 282(9), 1767–1770 (2009). [CrossRef]

12.

K. Narayanan, A. W. Elshaari, and S. F. Preble, “Broadband all-optical modulation in hydrogenated-amorphous silicon waveguides,” Opt. Express 18(10), 9809–9814 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

F. G. Della Corte, S. Rao, M. A. Nigro, F. Suriano, and C. Summonte, “Electro-optically induced absorption in alpha-Si:H/alpha-SiCN waveguiding multistacks,” Opt. Express 16(10), 7540–7550 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

S. Rao, F. G. Della Corte, C. Summonte, and F. Suriano, “Electro-optical modulating device based on a CMOS-compatible a-Si:H/a-SiCN multistack waveguide,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 16(1), 173–178 (2010). [CrossRef]

15.

K. Narayanan, A. W. Elshaari, and S. F. Preble, “Broadband all-optical modulation in hydrogenated-amorphous silicon waveguides,” Opt. Express 18(10), 9809–9814 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

F. G. Della Corte, S. Rao, G. Coppola, and C. Summonte, “Electro-optical modulation at 1550 nm in an as-deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n waveguiding device,” Opt. Express 19(4), 2941–2951 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

17.

RSoft Photonics CAD Layout User Guide, Rsoft Design Group, Inc. Physical Layer Division, 200 Executive Blvd. Ossining, NY 10562.

OCIS Codes
(130.3120) Integrated optics : Integrated optics devices
(230.2090) Optical devices : Electro-optical devices
(130.4110) Integrated optics : Modulators

ToC Category:
Integrated Optics

History
Original Manuscript: December 19, 2011
Revised Manuscript: January 23, 2012
Manuscript Accepted: January 27, 2012
Published: April 9, 2012

Citation
Sandro Rao, Giuseppe Coppola, Mariano A. Gioffrè, and Francesco G. Della Corte, "A 2.5 ns switching time Mach­Zehnder modulator in as-deposited a-Si:H," Opt. Express 20, 9351-9356 (2012)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-20-9-9351


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References

  1. L. C. Kimerling, D. Ahn, M. Beals, C.-Y. Hong, J. Liu, J. Michel, D. Pan, and D. K. Sparacin, “Electronic-photonic integrated circuits on the CMOS platform,” Proc. SPIE6125, 612502, 612502-10 (2006). [CrossRef]
  2. T. Pinguet, B. Analui, E. Balmater, D. Guckenberger, M. Harrison, R. Koumans, D. Kucharski, Y. Liang, G. Masini, A. Mekis, S. Mirsaidi, A. Narasimha, M. Peterson, D. Rines, V. Sadagopan, S. Sahni, T. J. Sleboda, D. Song, Y. Wang, B. Welch, J. Witzens, J. Yao, S. Abdalla, S. Gloeckner, and P. De Dobbelaer, “Monolithically Integrated High-Speed CMOS Photonic Transceivers,” in Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Group IV Photonics, 5th International Conference (2008).
  3. J. M. Fedeli, L. Di Cioccio, D. Marris-Morini, L. Vivien, R. Orobtchouk, P. Rojo-Romeo, C. Seassal, and F. Mandorlo, “Development of silicon photonics devices using microelectronic tools for the integration on top of a CMOS wafer,” Adv. Opt. Technol.2008, 1–15 (2008). [CrossRef]
  4. D. J. Thomson, F. Y. Gardes, Y. Hu, G. Mashanovich, M. Fournier, P. Grosse, J.-M. Fedeli, and G. T. Reed, “High contrast 40Gbit/s optical modulation in silicon,” Opt. Express19(12), 11507–11516 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. K. Preston, S. Manipatruni, A. Gondarenko, C. B. Poitras, and M. Lipson, “Deposited silicon high-speed integrated electro-optic modulator,” Opt. Express17(7), 5118–5124 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. K. Lee, D. J. Shin, H. Ji, K. Na, S. G. Kim, J. Bok, Y. You, S. Kim, I. Joe, S. D. Suh, J. Pyo, Y. Shin, K. Ha, Y. D. Park, and C. H. Chung, “10Gb/s Silicon Modulator Based on Bulk-Silicon Platform for DRAM Optical Interface,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2011), paper JThA033.
  7. K. Preston, P. Dong, B. Schmidt, and M. Lipson, “High-speed all-optical modulation using polycrystalline silicon microring resonators,” Appl. Phys. Lett.92(15), 151104 (2008). [CrossRef]
  8. K. Preston, C. B. Poitras, M. Thompson, and M. Lipson, “Photonic devices in low-temperature laser-crystallized deposited silicon,” in Proceedings of Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) and Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference (QELS) (2010).
  9. G. Cocorullo, F. G. Della Corte, R. De Rosa, I. Rendina, A. Rubino, and E. Terzini, “Amorphous silicon-based guided-wave passive and active devices for silicon integrated optoelectronics,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron.4(6), 997–1002 (1998). [CrossRef]
  10. A. Harke, M. Krause, and J. Mueller, “Low-loss single mode amorphous silicon waveguides,” Electron. Lett.41(25), 1377–1378 (2005). [CrossRef]
  11. S. K. Selvaraja, E. Sleeckx, M. Schaekers, W. Bogaerts, D. V. Thourhout, P. Dumon, and R. Baets, “Low-loss amorphous silicon-on-insulator technology for photonic integrated circuitry,” Opt. Commun.282(9), 1767–1770 (2009). [CrossRef]
  12. K. Narayanan, A. W. Elshaari, and S. F. Preble, “Broadband all-optical modulation in hydrogenated-amorphous silicon waveguides,” Opt. Express18(10), 9809–9814 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. F. G. Della Corte, S. Rao, M. A. Nigro, F. Suriano, and C. Summonte, “Electro-optically induced absorption in alpha-Si:H/alpha-SiCN waveguiding multistacks,” Opt. Express16(10), 7540–7550 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  14. S. Rao, F. G. Della Corte, C. Summonte, and F. Suriano, “Electro-optical modulating device based on a CMOS-compatible a-Si:H/a-SiCN multistack waveguide,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron.16(1), 173–178 (2010). [CrossRef]
  15. K. Narayanan, A. W. Elshaari, and S. F. Preble, “Broadband all-optical modulation in hydrogenated-amorphous silicon waveguides,” Opt. Express18(10), 9809–9814 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  16. F. G. Della Corte, S. Rao, G. Coppola, and C. Summonte, “Electro-optical modulation at 1550 nm in an as-deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n waveguiding device,” Opt. Express19(4), 2941–2951 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  17. RSoft Photonics CAD Layout User Guide, Rsoft Design Group, Inc. Physical Layer Division, 200 Executive Blvd. Ossining, NY 10562.

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