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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: Andrew M. Weiner
  • Vol. 21, Iss. 17 — Aug. 26, 2013
  • pp: 19880–19884
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Fully updatable three-dimensional holographic stereogram display device based on organic monolithic compound

Naoto Tsutsumi, Kenji Kinashi, Kazuhiro Tada, Kodai Fukuzawa, and Yutaka Kawabe  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 21, Issue 17, pp. 19880-19884 (2013)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.21.019880


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Abstract

Holographic technique is a unique method to reproduce object on a device in three dimensions (3D). It allows us real 3D images with full parallax without special eye glasses or any special optical devices. we present fully updatable holographic 3D display system using a holographic stereographic technique with a transparent optical device of poly(methylmethacrylate) doped organic compound of 3-[(4-nitrophenyl)azo]-9H-carbazole-9-ethanol (NACzE). 100 elemental holograms which are a series of pictures of object took from different angles can completely reproduce updatable entire hologram of object. Former hologram of object can be over-recorded and immediately replaced by new hologram of object without erasing process. Typical recording time for an elemental hologram is 200 ms, and total recording time including translational stage movement for 100 elemental holograms is 28 s. The present system with preferred memory is a good candidate for 3D signage application.

© 2013 OSA

1. Introduction

In this paper, we present fully updatable holographic 3D display system using a holographic stereographic technique with a transparent optical device of PMMA doped organic compound of NACzE. 100 elemental holograms which are a series of pictures of object took from different angles can completely reproduce updatable entire hologram of object.

2. Experimental Sections

Figure 1
Fig. 1 Schematic diagram of updatable 3D holographic display system. Laser sources are a green CW laser at 532 nm for recording and a yellow-orange laser at 594 nm or a red laser at 642 nm for reading. Image on SLM is projected on a diffuser and it is used as an object image. Collimated reference beam is adjusted as stripe beam using two cylindrical lenses.
shows the schematic diagram of updatable 3D holographic display system. Laser source is a palmtop diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) CW laser (SambaTM 1500, linewidth <1 MHz, 1.5 W at 532 nm, Cobolt, Sweden). CW laser beam was expanded using a combination of an object lens and a plano-convex lens. s-Polarized expanded beam split off by a beam splitter work as a reference beam and p-polarized beam transmitted through a beam splitter is reflected on a spatial light modulator (SLM, Holoeye LCR-1080 with 1920 x 1200 pixel resolution and 8.1 μm pixel size). Reflected beam work as an object beam. Polarization of a reflected beam from SLM is changed to s-polarization. Object image from SLM was projected on a diffuser, which was final object image for hologram. The distance between diffuser (holographic plane) and polymer composite (view plane) is 300 mm. Reference beam was further expanded using a combination of two plano-convex lenses with different focus length. Expanded beam was reshaped as stripe form using a combination of two cylinderical lenses. Object and reference beams are interfered on a polymer composite (view plane) and recorded hologram is simultaneously reconstructed by a palmtop s-polarized yellow-orange DPSS laser (MamboTM, linewidth <1 MHz, 100 mW at 594 nm, Cobolt, Sweden) or a palmtop s-polarized red probe beam (Omicron-Laserage semiconductor laser PhoxX 642, 140 mW at 642 nm). Typical intensity of an object beam is 22 mW and unit intensity of reference beam is 220 mW cm−2. Relatively thick sample device with thickness ca. 50 μm sandwiched between two glass plates of 100 mm × 100 mm size is shown in Fig. 2(a)
Fig. 2 Pictures of sample device. (a) Relatively thick sample device with thickness ca. 50 μm sandwiched between two glass plates of 100 mm × 100 mm size. (b) Thin sample device using spin coating technique on a glass plate with 100 mm × 100 mm size.
. Thin sample device fabricated using a spin coating technique on a glass plate with 100 mm × 100 mm size is also shown in Fig. 2(b).

Holographic stereography is used to reconstruct updatable 3D hologram in a device. Series of images of object on a rotational stage were captured by a CMOS camera (2M pixels, 40 fts) with a Tamron lens using SGVIEW (Sigma Koki, Japan) software operated on a computer. To get a horizontal parallax hologram, simultaneously rotating object, device equipped on a translational stage was moved every 0.6 or 0.8 mm interval and focused object image from SLM and stripe reference beam (60 mm long and 2 mm width) was interfered in a device every 600 ms including the time for moving translational and rotational stages. In this case total recording time for 100 steps is 60 s. Schematics of this procedure is shown in Fig. 1. To obtain holographic stereogram using the series of image of object already taken from different angles, we have developed the software, named holographic stereogram, KIT, to record the elemental hologram of object and to move translational stage. This software can provide minimum time for recording is 1 ms, but because of the limitation of the response time of liquid crystalline display and SLM, actual response time is limited 20 ms and above. Using this software, we can provide minimum holographic recording time for one elemental hologram, 20 ms for recording and 80 ms for stage translation.

3. Results and discussion

To apply the present technique and device to commercial product, easy fabrication of devices is demanded. Spin coating technique and roll to roll fabrication technique are preferred to make the large size devices. The possibility of spin coated device to the holographic display application is investigated. As shown in Fig. 2(b), we prepared spin coated film device for holographic display. Device thickness is 2 – 3 μm. Normal spin coating technique is used: 14 wt % of DMF solution was spin coated at 1000 rpm for 7 s followed by at 2000 rpm for 7 s. After spun, device was dried at 100 °C for 12 h. Sample device has enough absorbance of 1.1 at 532 nm. The same procedure shown in Fig. 4 is applied using spin coated holographic device. We could confirm that spin coated devices also work as an updatable holographic devices. These dynamic recording and simultaneous replaying hologram and over-recording are shown in Media 2. In the case of spin coated device, 200 ms is enough for recording each elemental hologram and total recording time for 100 elemental holograms is 28 s. A longer recording time leads to brighter hologram.

It is noted that NACzE/PMMA holographic device has superior feature that updatable 3D hologram can be recorded every 200 - 300 ms/step (20 s - 30 s for total 100 steps) with only interference beams. Conventional organic photorefractive polymer device requires applied electric field up to 40 - 60 V μm−1 to achieve effective diffraction efficiency and fast response time. In that case, fast response time is a merit for holographic reconstruction of object images on a SLM with a video refresh rate [10

10. S. Tsujimura, K. Kinashi, W. Sakai, and N. Tsutsumi, “High-speed photorefractive response capability in triphenylamine polymer-based composites,” Appl. Phys. Express 5(6), 064101 (2012). [CrossRef]

]. However, fast response time usually loses the memory effect of hologram imaging. Namely quick response of hologram imaging means quick change of hologram imaging. For the holographic imaging of signage applications, memory effect of hologram is required. The present material is suitable for such holographic display. Furthermore, the performance of the device has no change even though one and half years had passed after fabrication. Our system works using palmtop CW lasers, it allows us compact design of system.

4. Conclusions

Our successful demonstration of real-time holographic display using quickly updatable holographic medium will open a door for the large size optical devices targeted on 3D digital signage and true real-time 3D holographic display without any special eye-glasses.

Acknowledgments

This research is supported by program for Strategic Promotion of Innovative Research and Development (SPIRE), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST).

References and links

1.

D. Gabor, “A new microscopic principle,” Nature 161(4098), 777–778 (1948). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

2.

V. Toal, Introduction to Holography (CRC Press, 2012), Chap. 6.

3.

S. Ducharme, J. C. Scott, R. J. Twieg, and W. E. Moerner, “Observation of the photorefractive effect in a polymer,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 66(14), 1846–1849 (1991). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

O. Ostroverkhova and W. E. Moerner, “Organic photorefractives: mechanisms, materials, and applications,” Chem. Rev. 104(7), 3267–3314 (2004) (and references there in.). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

P. Blanche, S. Tay, R. Voorakaranam, P. Saint-Hilaire, C. Christenson, T. Gu, W. Lin, D. Flores, P. Wang, M. Yamamoto, J. Thomas, R. A. Norwood, and N. Peyghambarian, “An updatable holographic display for 3D visualization,” J. Display Tech. 4(4), 424–430 (2008), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/jdt/abstract.cfm?uri=jdt-4-4-424. [CrossRef]

6.

P.-A. Blanche, A. Bablumian, R. Voorakaranam, C. Christenson, W. Lin, T. Gu, D. Flores, P. Wang, W.-Y. Hsieh, M. Kathaperumal, B. Rachwal, O. Siddiqui, J. Thomas, R. A. Norwood, M. Yamamoto, and N. Peyghambarian, “Holographic three-dimensional telepresence using large-area photorefractive polymer,” Nature 468(7320), 80–83 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

M. Paturzo, P. Memmolo, A. Finizio, R. Näsänen, T. J. Naughton, and P. Ferraro, “Synthesis and display of dynamic holographic 3D scenes with real-world objects,” Opt. Express 18(9), 8806–8815 (2010), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?uri=oe-18-9-8806. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

N. Tsutsumi, K. Kinashi, W. Sakai, J. Nishide, Y. Kawabe, and H. Sasabe, “Real-time three-dimensional holographic display using a monolithic organic compound dispersed film,” Opt. Mater. Express 2(8), 1003–1010 (2012), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ome/abstract.cfm?uri=ome-2-8-1003. [CrossRef]

9.

N. Tsutsumi, K. Kinashi, W. Sakai, J. Nishide, Y. Kawabe, and H. Sasabe, “Fully updatable three-dimensional holographic display device using a monolithic compound,” Proceedings of DH & 3D Imaging, DM2C.2 (2012). http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=DH-2012-DM2C.2&origin=search [CrossRef]

10.

S. Tsujimura, K. Kinashi, W. Sakai, and N. Tsutsumi, “High-speed photorefractive response capability in triphenylamine polymer-based composites,” Appl. Phys. Express 5(6), 064101 (2012). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(090.2870) Holography : Holographic display
(090.7330) Holography : Volume gratings
(190.2055) Nonlinear optics : Dynamic gratings
(090.5694) Holography : Real-time holography

ToC Category:
Nonlinear Optics

History
Original Manuscript: May 23, 2013
Revised Manuscript: June 27, 2013
Manuscript Accepted: July 2, 2013
Published: August 16, 2013

Citation
Naoto Tsutsumi, Kenji Kinashi, Kazuhiro Tada, Kodai Fukuzawa, and Yutaka Kawabe, "Fully updatable three-dimensional holographic stereogram display device based on organic monolithic compound," Opt. Express 21, 19880-19884 (2013)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-21-17-19880


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References

  1. D. Gabor, “A new microscopic principle,” Nature161(4098), 777–778 (1948). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. V. Toal, Introduction to Holography (CRC Press, 2012), Chap. 6.
  3. S. Ducharme, J. C. Scott, R. J. Twieg, and W. E. Moerner, “Observation of the photorefractive effect in a polymer,” Phys. Rev. Lett.66(14), 1846–1849 (1991). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. O. Ostroverkhova and W. E. Moerner, “Organic photorefractives: mechanisms, materials, and applications,” Chem. Rev.104(7), 3267–3314 (2004) (and references there in.). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. P. Blanche, S. Tay, R. Voorakaranam, P. Saint-Hilaire, C. Christenson, T. Gu, W. Lin, D. Flores, P. Wang, M. Yamamoto, J. Thomas, R. A. Norwood, and N. Peyghambarian, “An updatable holographic display for 3D visualization,” J. Display Tech.4(4), 424–430 (2008), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/jdt/abstract.cfm?uri=jdt-4-4-424 . [CrossRef]
  6. P.-A. Blanche, A. Bablumian, R. Voorakaranam, C. Christenson, W. Lin, T. Gu, D. Flores, P. Wang, W.-Y. Hsieh, M. Kathaperumal, B. Rachwal, O. Siddiqui, J. Thomas, R. A. Norwood, M. Yamamoto, and N. Peyghambarian, “Holographic three-dimensional telepresence using large-area photorefractive polymer,” Nature468(7320), 80–83 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. M. Paturzo, P. Memmolo, A. Finizio, R. Näsänen, T. J. Naughton, and P. Ferraro, “Synthesis and display of dynamic holographic 3D scenes with real-world objects,” Opt. Express18(9), 8806–8815 (2010), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?uri=oe-18-9-8806 . [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  8. N. Tsutsumi, K. Kinashi, W. Sakai, J. Nishide, Y. Kawabe, and H. Sasabe, “Real-time three-dimensional holographic display using a monolithic organic compound dispersed film,” Opt. Mater. Express2(8), 1003–1010 (2012), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ome/abstract.cfm?uri=ome-2-8-1003 . [CrossRef]
  9. N. Tsutsumi, K. Kinashi, W. Sakai, J. Nishide, Y. Kawabe, and H. Sasabe, “Fully updatable three-dimensional holographic display device using a monolithic compound,” Proceedings of DH & 3D Imaging, DM2C.2 (2012). http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=DH-2012-DM2C.2&origin=search [CrossRef]
  10. S. Tsujimura, K. Kinashi, W. Sakai, and N. Tsutsumi, “High-speed photorefractive response capability in triphenylamine polymer-based composites,” Appl. Phys. Express5(6), 064101 (2012). [CrossRef]

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