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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: Andrew M. Weiner
  • Vol. 21, Iss. 18 — Sep. 9, 2013
  • pp: 21317–21328
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Electromagnetic waves in a topological insulator thin film stack: helicon-like wave mode and photonic band structure

Jun-ichi Inoue  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 21, Issue 18, pp. 21317-21328 (2013)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.21.021317


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Abstract

We theoretically explore the electromagnetic modes specific to a topological insulator superlattice in which topological and conventional insulator thin films are stacked periodically. In particular, we obtain analytic formulas for low energy mode that corresponds to a helicon wave, as well as those for photonic bands. We illustrate that the system can be modeled as a stack of quantum Hall layers whose conductivity tensors alternately change signs, and then we analyze the photonic band structures. This subject is a natural extension of a previous study by Tselis et al., which took into consideration a stack of identical quantum Hall layers but their discussion was limited into a low energy mode. Thus we provide analytic formulas for photonic bands and compare their features between the two systems. Our central findings in the topological insulator superlattice are that a low energy mode corresponding to a helicon wave has linear dispersion instead of the conventional quadratic form, and that a robust gapless photonic band appears although the system considered has spacial periodicity. In addition, we demonstrate that the photonic bands agree with the numerically calculated transmission spectra.

© 2013 OSA

1. Introduction

Helicon waves are one of the canonical elements that characterize electromagnetic (EM) properties of bulk semiconductors in the low energy region [1

1. E. D. Palik and J. K. Furdyna, “Infrared and microwave magnetoplasma effects in semiconductors,” Rep. Prog. Phys. 33, 1193–1322 (1970). [CrossRef]

3

3. J. J. Quinn and K-s. Yi, Solid State Physics: Principles and Modern Applications (Springer, 2009).

]. Bulk semiconductors generally fail to propagate transverse EM waves whose frequencies are lower than the plasma frequency, because carriers in the sample can instantaneously follow a slow modulation induced by the EM wave, resulting in total reflection. However, once an external magnetic field is applied, for instance along the z-axis, a branch of the EM mode that is active for a specific circular polarization appears below the plasma frequency. This low energy mode, or helicon wave, propagates parallel along the direction of the applied magnetic field. The features of this mode are that in the long wavelength limit kz → 0, the dispersion relation is gapless and quadratic, ωkz2; also, the proportionality coefficient depends on the amplitude of the magnetic field.

The helicon wave can also propagate in a semiconductor system with a long period structure, as shown by Tselis et al. [4

4. A. C. Tselis and J. J. Quinn, “Retardation effects and transverse collective excitations in semiconductor superlattices,” Phys. Rev. B 29, 2021–2027 (1984). [CrossRef]

]. They considered a semiconductor superlattice in which each interface is assumed to be an infinitely thin two dimensional electron layer (2DEL) with conductivity tensor σ. Then they modeled the superlattice as stacked 2DELs along the z direction under an external magnetic field. This one dimensional periodic system, schematically shown in Fig. 1(a), is the simplest in the sense that each unit “cell” contains a single “site.” The authors in [4

4. A. C. Tselis and J. J. Quinn, “Retardation effects and transverse collective excitations in semiconductor superlattices,” Phys. Rev. B 29, 2021–2027 (1984). [CrossRef]

] had a keen interest in the long wavelength limit; they found a low energy EM mode whose nature was identical to that of the helicon wave in isotropic bulk semiconductors. They further applied their theory to a novel system called a quantum Hall layer stack (QHLS); in this stack each 2DEL was assumed to be in the quantum Hall state. In this case, since the diagonal conductivity is null, each layer is characterized solely by its own Hall conductivity. Although the helicon wave dispersion expected in the QHLS was also found to be gapless and quadratic, the curvature of the dispersion relation no longer depends on the magnetic field.

Fig. 1 (a) Schematic of a stack of quantum Hall layers, QHLS, which was considered in [4]. This system shows distinct EM properties between the two circular polarizations E± and in the long wavelength limit, it has a gapless quadratic dispersion relation that is active only for E+. (b) Schematic of our system, AQHLS, which is a stack of quantum Hall layers whose conductivities change signs layer by layer. The EM properties for the two polarizations are identical. (c) Topological insulator superlattice, which can be model by the system in (b). Gray (white) regions indicate topological (conventional) insulator thin films. (d) Asymmetric AQHLS (0 < α < 2).

One might think an AQHLS to be artificial, but it connects to a realistic system encountered in modern condensed matter physics; i.e., an AQHLS mimics a topological insulator superlattice. A topological insulator, whose typical examples are Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3, has bulk properties similar to those of conventional band insulators, but has a novel property in that its surface state is metallic [5

5. M. Z. Hasan and C. L. Kane, “Topological insulators,” Rev. Mod. Phys. 82, 3045–3067 (2010). [CrossRef]

7

7. M. Z. Hasan and J. E. Moore, “Three-dimensional topological insulators,” Ann. Rev. Condens. Matter Phys. 2, 55–78 (2011). [CrossRef]

]. The surface state is expected to exhibit the quantum charge/spin Hall effect without an external magnetic field. The following discussion emphasizes the point that the two interfaces of a topological insulator in slab geometry have quantized Hall conductivities with opposite signs (shown later) [8

8. A. M. Essin, J. E. Moore, and D. Vanderbilt, “Magnetoelectric polarizability and axion electrodynamics in crystalline insulators,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 146805-1–146805-4 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. Note that a similar system is expected by considering bianisotropic photonic metamaterials [9

9. C. E. Kriegler, M. S. Rill, S. Linden, and M. Wegener, “Bianisotropic photonic metamaterials,”IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quant. Electron. 16, 367–375 (2010).

]. Exploiting these facts, we can use the system shown in Fig. 1(b) to model the topological insulator superlattice shown in Fig. 1(c).

The system considered here is also intriguing from the viewpoint of photonic band structures [10

10. T. Ochiai, “Theory of Light Scattering in Axion Electrodynamics,” J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 81, 094401–094408 (2012). [CrossRef]

]. The fundamental physics of photonic bands has been extensively studied, but we find a nontrivial aspect to our system: Since the AQHLS is periodic, a finite band gap is naturally expected to open at the zone boundary. However, it might also be considered as a “vacuum” under an appropriate condition, because of the two interfaces having opposite signs in their Hall conductivities.

In this paper, we explore properties of EM waves in a topological insulator superlattice. In the long wavelength limit, we find a gapless EM mode, which is a known feature of conventional helicon waves. However, in marked contrast, the dispersion relation is linear instead of quadratic, and the mode is active for both circular polarizations. We then analytically obtain explicit equations for the photonic band structures of the geometries in both Figs.1(a) and 1(b). The former gives a distinct photonic band for each circular polarization, one of which is gap-less and thus continuously connects to the quadratic helicon mode found in [4

4. A. C. Tselis and J. J. Quinn, “Retardation effects and transverse collective excitations in semiconductor superlattices,” Phys. Rev. B 29, 2021–2027 (1984). [CrossRef]

]. The latter, the model of the topological insulator superlattice, has two kinds of photonic bands, since the unit “cell” has two “sites.” Both photonic bands do not depend on the polarization direction. What should be emphasized is that one of the photonic bands has nowhere energy gaps, in spite of the presence of periodicity. This fact indicates that the AQHLS can be interpreted as a “vacuum” due to the contributions from pairs of layers having opposite signs for the conductivities. The resulting photonic band structure is compared with a numerically calculated transmission spectrum. Finally, by introducing asymmetry in AQHLS, as Fig. 1(d), the two features, the gapless linear low energy mode and a presence of the gapless band, are demonstrated not to be limited to the case of Fig. 1(b).

2. Helicon waves in stacked quantum Hall layers

3. Low energy EM waves in a stack of alternating quantum Hall layers

3.1. Equivalence of a topological insulator superlattice and an AQHLS

We verify our claim that the AQHLS is a model for a topological insulator superlattice. This fact relies on a novel EM property inherent to topological insulators [12

12. X. L. Qi, T. L. Hughes, and S. C. Zhang, “Topological field theory of time-reversal invariant insulators,” Phys. Rev. B 78, 195424-1–195424-43 (2008). [CrossRef]

16

16. M. C. Chang and M. F. Yang, “Optical signature of topological insulators,” Phys. Rev. B 80, 113304-1–113304-4 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. The topological EM response is described within a theoretical framework termed axion electrodynamics [17

17. F. Wilczek, “Two applications of axion electrodynamics,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1799–1802 (1987). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], originally introduced in the context of high energy physics. As a prerequisite, time reversal symmetry should be broken. One of the methods proposed for that is to make a contact with a magnetic material [12

12. X. L. Qi, T. L. Hughes, and S. C. Zhang, “Topological field theory of time-reversal invariant insulators,” Phys. Rev. B 78, 195424-1–195424-43 (2008). [CrossRef]

]. In our case, for instance, transparent ferromagnetic material, TiO2 codoped with Fe and Nb [18

18. E. Sakai, A. Chikamatsu, Y. Hirose, T. Shimada, and T. Hasegawa, “Magnetic and transport properties of anatase TiO2 codoped with Fe and Nb,” Appl. Phys. Express 3, 043001-1–043001-3 (2010).

], is suitable [19

19. J. Inoue, “An optical test for identifying topological insulator thin films,” Opt. Express 21, 8564–8569 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,20

20. J. Inoue and A. Tanaka, “Photoinduced spin Chern number change in a two-dimensional quantum spin Hall insulator with broken spin rotational symmetry,” Phys. Rev. B 85, 125425-1–125425-7 (2012). [CrossRef]

], and this kind of material having a finite energy gap is assumed as a conventional insulator in the following discussion, although fabrication of AQHLS on target, in particular alignment of magnetization direction, is challenging.

Peculiar EM responses from topological insulators are captured by considering an axion term whose Lagrangian is ℒax = θ ∫ drE · B. Here, the coupling coefficient θ is a topological number intrinsic to a given material. However, the addition of this term to the conventional Lagrangian for the Maxwell theory does not produce a substantial difference in the corresponding Euler–Lagrange equation, since ℒax is essentially a term given by the total derivative of another quantity [21

21. W. Dittrich and M. Reuter, Selected Topics in Gauge Theories (Springer, 1986).

]. The net effect of the term θ is incorporated into the Maxwell theory by an extension of conventional constitutive relations from D = εE and H = (1/μ0)B to D = εEatopB and H = (1/μ0)B + btopE [12

12. X. L. Qi, T. L. Hughes, and S. C. Zhang, “Topological field theory of time-reversal invariant insulators,” Phys. Rev. B 78, 195424-1–195424-43 (2008). [CrossRef]

, 13

13. X. L. Qi, J. Zang, and S. C. Zhang, “Inducing a magnetic monopole with topological surface states,” Science 323, 1184–1187 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. The second terms in the latter two equations are referred to as cross correlated terms [22

22. M. Fiebig, “Revival of the magnetoelectric effect,” J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 38, R123–R152 (2005). [CrossRef]

].

We can generalize the above discussion to a case with two interfaces. A topological insulator thin film sandwiched by conventional insulators has surface quantized Hall conductivities on both interfaces. Note that the signs of the Hall conductivities are opposite to one another [8

8. A. M. Essin, J. E. Moore, and D. Vanderbilt, “Magnetoelectric polarizability and axion electrodynamics in crystalline insulators,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 146805-1–146805-4 (2009). [CrossRef]

]; this can be easily seen from the fact that the cross correlated term in H has the form btop[Θ(z) − Θ(zd)]E for a film with thickness d. Thus, the topological insulator superlattice in Fig. 1(c) can be modeled by the system shown in Fig. 1(b).

Before moving to a discussion about low energy EM modes, we emphasize that the scheme of using the surface quantized Hall conductivity is advantageous over the alternatives. One reason is that the scheme fully utilizes the novel nature of topological insulators. In addition, compared to other approaches, the method reduces the complexity of the problem and enables a simple analysis. The latter advantage is essential in deriving analytic formulas for photonic band structures in Sec. 4. To highlight the role of quantum Hall layers and to emphasize differences between AQHLS and QHLS, we set ε2/ε1 = 1 throughout this work.

3.2. Gapless linear EM mode

Having demonstrated the equivalence between the AQHLS shown in Fig. 1(b) and the topological insulator superlattice, we now characterize the expected low energy EM modes. The analysis can be performed by generalizing the procedure in Sec. 2. The Hall conductivity in each layer changes sign layer by layer, and the conductivity for the system is denoted by
σ±(z)=σ±[mδ(z2dm)mδ(z2dmd)],
(13)
with an integer m. Consequently, the electric field is written in the form
E±(z)=σ±ξ[z:+exp(β|zz|)E±(+)(z)z:exp(β|zz|)E±()(z)],
(14)
where the symbol ∑z′ indicates the sum with respect to the position z′ of a layer with ±σ, E(+)(z = 2dm) and E(−)(z = 2dm + d) are electric fields at an interface with +σ and −σ, respectively.

Now consider an electric field E±(+)(z=2dm) on the left hand side of Eq. (14). Substituting the ansatz E±(+)(2dm)=E±0(+)exp(ik2dm) and E±()(2dm+d)=E±0()exp(ik(2dm+d)) in Eq. (14), we are lead to one of the secular equations,
ξE±0(+)=σ±SE±0(+)σ±SE±0(),
(15)
where S is given in Eq. (7), and
S=2isinΩ2cosK2cosΩcosK,
(16)
is newly introduced. Similarly, we find the other secular equation by considering E±() on the left hand side of Eq. (14):
ξE±0()=σ±SE±0(+)σ±SE±0().
(17)
From the condition that the set of Eqs. (15) and (17) has nontrivial solutions, we obtain an equation to determine a dispersion relation
ξ2σ±2(S2S2)=0.
(18)
Taking the long wavelength limit K → 0 and confining ourselves to a low energy region, as in Sec. 2, a dispersion relation corresponding to Eq. (8) is obtained:
Ω1±K(1+A)1/2,
(19)
which is once again gapless and A≡ −(σ̂±/ξ)2 = (2πσ̂xy/ε1/2c)2 is defined. However, we can observe two sharp contrasts: the mode is active for both circular polarizations, and the wavenumber dependence is linear instead of quadratic.

4. Electromagnetic dispersion relation: analytic form of one dimensional photonic bands

Since the present systems contain a spatial periodicity, the EM dispersion relation should reflect this structure and thus construct a one dimensional photonic band. To show this, Eqs. (6) and (18), which were used to explore the low-energy EM modes, are also applied over the entire energy region, as long as we assumed that material parameters are insensitive to the frequency under consideration.

A photonic band structure in QHLS for E+ and E polarizations should be separately determined from the equation ξ = σ+S and ξ = σS, respectively. The solutions are straightforwardly found to be
Ω1=cos1[cosK+(A2+Asin2K)1/21+A],
(20)
Ω2=cos1[cosK(A2+Asin2K)1/21+A].
(21)
Here there is a subtlety; in the course of solving those equations, we square both sides of the equations. This procedure, however, provides the common equation ξ2 = (σ+S)2 = (σS)2 for the two polarizations, and information with respect to the polarization has been lost. Consequently, there is no one to one correspondence between the solutions of Ω1,2 and the EM modes Ω± for E±. To recover the correspondence, we need to return to the original equations ξ = σ±S.

From a careful classification, we find that the nth branch of the photonic band for E+ polarization is Ω+(n=2m1)=Ω1, Ω+(n=2m)=Ω2, and that for E polarization is Ω(n=2m1)=Ω2, Ω(n=2m)=Ω1. These are combined into a single equation
Ω±(n)=cos1[cosK(1)n(A2+Asin2K)1/21+A].
(22)
To illustrate this formula, consider Ω1, for instance, in the vicinity of K = 0 and Ω1 = 2π, whose curves are shown in Fig. 2. Rewrite the equation for E+ (E) polarization, ξ = σ+S (ξ = σS), in the form cosΩ1 − cosK = −asinΩ1 (cos Ω1 − cosK = +asinΩ1), where a ≡ 2πσ̂xy/(ε1/2c) is assumed to be positive. For K = 0, the left-hand side of the equation is cosΩ1 − 1 ≤ 0, and thus the right-hand side should be negative. This indicates that Ω1 ≥ 2π1 < 2π) in the vicinity of Ω1 = 2π. Consequently, the upper (lower) branch in Fig. 2 is assigned to the mode for E+ (E). Repeating this sort of discussion, we finally arrive at Eq. (22). The photonic band structures Ω±(n) with corresponding transmission spectra (discussed in Sec. 5) are illustrated in Figs. 3(a) and 3(b), respectively. The band gaps appear between the branches, all with equal magnitude given by θ = cos−1[(1 − A)/(1 + A)]. Thus the bandwidth πθ is identical for all branches in Ω±(n).

Fig. 2 Two branches of Ω1, from Eq. (20), in the vicinity of K = 0 and Ω1 = 2π.
Fig. 3 Photonic band structures (a) Ω+ and (b) Ω for E+ and E, respectively, in a QHLS as functions of K. The right panels in (a) and (b) are corresponding transmission spectra T as functions of Ω.

The helicon wave discussed in Sec. 2 should appear in the gapless photonic band structure Ω+ in the long wavelength limit. Consider the lowest branch of the photonic band, Ω+(1), which satisfies the equation cosΩ+(1)=(1+A)1(cosK+(A2+Asin2K)1/2). Expanding the left and right hand sides up to the second and fourth orders, respectively, one finds the relation (Ω+(1))2~K4, which reproduces the gapless quadratic dispersion relation. This derivation also proves that the helicon mode obtained in Sec. 2 is active only for E+ polarization. On the other hand, Ω(1) has a finite energy gap in the K → 0 limit, and thus there is no low energy EM mode active for E polarization.

The AQHLS provides photonic bands qualitatively different from those in QHLS. The photonic bands are obtained from Eq. (18),
A(S2S2)=1.
(23)
This equation commonly holds for both polarizations E±, in contrast to the case of QHLS. The two solutions of Eq. (23) are
Ω1±=cos1[A+cosK1+A],
(24)
Ω2±=K.
(25)
The former photonic band Ω with corresponding transmission spectrum is shown in Fig. 4(a). This band structure has identical energy gaps ΔΩ = 2θ and bandwidth 2(πθ), except for the lowest photonic band whose width is πθ.

Fig. 4 (a) Photonic band structure Ω and transmission spectrum in AQHLS. (b) “Vacuum” like photonic band Ω found in AQHLS.

In the long wavelength limit K → 0 the dispersion is gapless and hence should coincide with the low energy mode in Eq. (19). This fact is confirmed by expanding Ω in the vicinity of the origin. Indeed, we reproduce the relation, ΩK/(1 + A)1/2, from Eq. (24). As aforementioned, the mode is linear, gapless, and active for both polarizations E±. Hence, this mode is a generalization of the conventional helicon wave found in bulk semiconductors under magnetic fields.

In the present study of photonic bands, the scheme using the surface Hall conductivity is essential; this scheme enables us to obtain analytic formulas of photonic bands, Eqs. (22), (24) and (25). Furthermore, the interpretation that one aspect of the AQHLS is effectively “vacuum” in the context of EM response would not be available unless this scheme is employed.

5. Transmission spectra

The transmission spectra for QHLS are shown in the right panels in Figs. 3(a) and 3(b) for E+ and E polarizations, respectively. The fine fringes in the spectra are due to finite sized effects. In both polarizations, the transmission spectra have two values: T = 1 and T = 0 (note that real dielectric constants are assumed). The former appears in energy regions where the photonic bands are constructed, whereas the latter corresponds to photonic band gaps. Similarly, the transmission spectrum for AQHLS is shown in the right panel in Fig. 4(a). This spectrum corresponds to Ω. As in the case of QHLS, the transmission spectrum shows good agreement with the photonic band structure Ω. We confirm that the spectra are common to both polarizations E±.

6. Asymmetric AQHLS

So far, we have emphasized the two features in AQHLS: the linear gapless low energy mode ΩK, and the presence of a gapless photonic band Ω = K. Both of these are common for the two circular polarizations. Since these results are derived in a limited case, we now relax the conditions imposed on AQHLS and introduce asymmetry in the model. We show that these two features are still valid.

Consider an asymmetric AQHLS shown in Fig. 1(d), where the layers with σ are located at z = 2dm +αd (0 < α < 2), while those with σ+ are at z = 2dm. From a cumbersome but parallel calculation with that for symmetric case (i.e., α = 1), the secular equation for general α is found to be
2A(cosΩcosK)sin(α2Ω)sin(2α2Ω)=(cosΩcosK)2.
(26)
Thus, we can immediately find relations that the two modes, Ω and Ω, should satisfy:
2Asin(α2Ω1±)sin(2α2Ω1±)=cosΩ1±cosK,
(27)
cosΩ2±cosK=0.
(28)
From the former, when Ω, K ≪ 1, the gapless linear low energy mode
Ω1±K{1+Aα(2α)}1/2,
(29)
and from the latter, the gapless photonic band Ω = K, are obtained, respectively. Thus those two features found in the symmetric case are not accidental, but robust against the introduction of the asymmetry. Interestingly, we can observe that Eq. (26) reduces to (cosΩ − cosK)2 = 0, by intentionally setting α = 0 and 2. Consequently, we obtain doubly degenerated gapless bands, Ω = Ω = K. Note that when the cross correlated terms, or equivalently σ±, are removed from AQHLS, a conventional dispersion relation of EM waves, ω = (c/ε1/2)k, or Ω = K, should be obtained, since the AQHLS now loses the spatial periodicity and then turns into a uniform system.

In contrast to those features robust against α ≠ 1, we find an aspect that is limited in the symmetric case; the EM modes of Ω = 2 (n = 1,2,···) at K = 0 in symmetric AQHLS disappear once the asymmetry is introduced. Indeed, we can see in Eq. (27) that when α ≠ 1, although Ω = 0 and K = 0 is still its solution, Ω = 2 ceases to be a solution at K = 0. Instead, Ω opens finite band gaps at these points. Thus, the zero gap at (K, Ω) = (0, 2) is limited in the case of α = 1.

7. Summary and conclusions

Acknowledgments

The author was supported in part by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) 22540340 from MEXT, Japan.

References and links

1.

E. D. Palik and J. K. Furdyna, “Infrared and microwave magnetoplasma effects in semiconductors,” Rep. Prog. Phys. 33, 1193–1322 (1970). [CrossRef]

2.

P. M. Platzman and P. A. Wolff, Waves and Interactions in Solids State Plasma, Solid State Phys. 13 (Academic Press, 1972).

3.

J. J. Quinn and K-s. Yi, Solid State Physics: Principles and Modern Applications (Springer, 2009).

4.

A. C. Tselis and J. J. Quinn, “Retardation effects and transverse collective excitations in semiconductor superlattices,” Phys. Rev. B 29, 2021–2027 (1984). [CrossRef]

5.

M. Z. Hasan and C. L. Kane, “Topological insulators,” Rev. Mod. Phys. 82, 3045–3067 (2010). [CrossRef]

6.

X. L. Qi and S. C. Zhang, “Topological insulators and superconductors,” Rev. Mod. Phys. 83, 1057–1110 (2011). [CrossRef]

7.

M. Z. Hasan and J. E. Moore, “Three-dimensional topological insulators,” Ann. Rev. Condens. Matter Phys. 2, 55–78 (2011). [CrossRef]

8.

A. M. Essin, J. E. Moore, and D. Vanderbilt, “Magnetoelectric polarizability and axion electrodynamics in crystalline insulators,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 146805-1–146805-4 (2009). [CrossRef]

9.

C. E. Kriegler, M. S. Rill, S. Linden, and M. Wegener, “Bianisotropic photonic metamaterials,”IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quant. Electron. 16, 367–375 (2010).

10.

T. Ochiai, “Theory of Light Scattering in Axion Electrodynamics,” J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 81, 094401–094408 (2012). [CrossRef]

11.

K. W. Chiu and J. J. Quinn, Phys. Rev. B 9, “Plasma oscillations of a two-dimensional electron gas in a strong magnetic field,” 4724–4732 (1974). [CrossRef]

12.

X. L. Qi, T. L. Hughes, and S. C. Zhang, “Topological field theory of time-reversal invariant insulators,” Phys. Rev. B 78, 195424-1–195424-43 (2008). [CrossRef]

13.

X. L. Qi, J. Zang, and S. C. Zhang, “Inducing a magnetic monopole with topological surface states,” Science 323, 1184–1187 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

J. Maciejko, X. L. Qi, H. D. Drew, and S. C. Zhang, “Topological quantization in units of the fine structure constant,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 166803-1–166803-4 (2010). [CrossRef]

15.

W. K. Tse and A. H. MacDonald, “Giant magneto-optical Kerr effect and universal Faraday effect in thin-film topological insulators,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 057401-1–057401-4 (2010). [CrossRef]

16.

M. C. Chang and M. F. Yang, “Optical signature of topological insulators,” Phys. Rev. B 80, 113304-1–113304-4 (2009). [CrossRef]

17.

F. Wilczek, “Two applications of axion electrodynamics,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1799–1802 (1987). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

18.

E. Sakai, A. Chikamatsu, Y. Hirose, T. Shimada, and T. Hasegawa, “Magnetic and transport properties of anatase TiO2 codoped with Fe and Nb,” Appl. Phys. Express 3, 043001-1–043001-3 (2010).

19.

J. Inoue, “An optical test for identifying topological insulator thin films,” Opt. Express 21, 8564–8569 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

20.

J. Inoue and A. Tanaka, “Photoinduced spin Chern number change in a two-dimensional quantum spin Hall insulator with broken spin rotational symmetry,” Phys. Rev. B 85, 125425-1–125425-7 (2012). [CrossRef]

21.

W. Dittrich and M. Reuter, Selected Topics in Gauge Theories (Springer, 1986).

22.

M. Fiebig, “Revival of the magnetoelectric effect,” J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 38, R123–R152 (2005). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(310.6860) Thin films : Thin films, optical properties
(160.5293) Materials : Photonic bandgap materials
(310.6805) Thin films : Theory and design

ToC Category:
Thin Films

History
Original Manuscript: July 10, 2013
Revised Manuscript: August 26, 2013
Manuscript Accepted: August 26, 2013
Published: September 4, 2013

Citation
Jun-ichi Inoue, "Electromagnetic waves in a topological insulator thin film stack: helicon-like wave mode and photonic band structure," Opt. Express 21, 21317-21328 (2013)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-21-18-21317


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References

  1. E. D. Palik and J. K. Furdyna, “Infrared and microwave magnetoplasma effects in semiconductors,” Rep. Prog. Phys.33, 1193–1322 (1970). [CrossRef]
  2. P. M. Platzman and P. A. Wolff, Waves and Interactions in Solids State Plasma, Solid State Phys. 13 (Academic Press, 1972).
  3. J. J. Quinn and K-s. Yi, Solid State Physics: Principles and Modern Applications (Springer, 2009).
  4. A. C. Tselis and J. J. Quinn, “Retardation effects and transverse collective excitations in semiconductor superlattices,” Phys. Rev. B29, 2021–2027 (1984). [CrossRef]
  5. M. Z. Hasan and C. L. Kane, “Topological insulators,” Rev. Mod. Phys.82, 3045–3067 (2010). [CrossRef]
  6. X. L. Qi and S. C. Zhang, “Topological insulators and superconductors,” Rev. Mod. Phys.83, 1057–1110 (2011). [CrossRef]
  7. M. Z. Hasan and J. E. Moore, “Three-dimensional topological insulators,” Ann. Rev. Condens. Matter Phys.2, 55–78 (2011). [CrossRef]
  8. A. M. Essin, J. E. Moore, and D. Vanderbilt, “Magnetoelectric polarizability and axion electrodynamics in crystalline insulators,” Phys. Rev. Lett.102, 146805-1–146805-4 (2009). [CrossRef]
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