OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: Andrew M. Weiner
  • Vol. 21, Iss. 22 — Nov. 4, 2013
  • pp: 25744–25751
« Show journal navigation

Controllable chrominance and highly improved luminescent quantum yield of YV1-xPxO4: Tm, Dy, Eu inverse opal white light phosphors

Pingwei Zhou, Yongsheng Zhu, Wen Xu, Lin Xu, and Hongwei Song  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 21, Issue 22, pp. 25744-25751 (2013)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.21.025744


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (1593 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

In this work, rare earth (RE) ions tri-doped YV1-xPxO4: RE3+ (RE = Tm, Dy, Eu) inverse opal photonic crystals (IOPCs) were fabricated by the PMMA template method, which demonstrated efficient white light emissions under ultraviolet excitation. It is significant to observe that the chrominance of the white light could be largely modulated by the photonic stop band of the IOPCs. And more, the photoluminescence quantum yield in the IOPCs was largely improved over the grinded reference (REF) because the undesired energy transfer (ET) process was effectively restrained.

© 2013 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

Since the pioneering works by Yablonovitch [1

1. E. Yablonovitch, “Inhibited spontaneous emission in solid-state physics and electronics,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 58(20), 2059–2062 (1987). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] and John [2

2. S. John, “Strong localization of photons in certain disordered dielectric superlattices,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 58(23), 2486–2489 (1987). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] in 1987, photonic crystals (PCs) have attracted considerable interests. Possessing spatial periodicity in their dielectric constants on the length scale of the optical wavelength, PCs behave with respect to electromagnetic waves like atomic crystals do with respect to electrons. As an electronic band gap is created by the periodic arrangement of atoms in a semiconductor, the periodic electromagnetic modulation created by the PCs can yield a photonic stop band (PSB), a band of frequency for which light propagation in the PCs is forbidden. PCs have demonstrated a wide variety of applications, such as optical waveguides with sharp bands, optical circuits, optical signal modulators and etc [3

3. A. Majumdar, J. Kim, J. Vuckovic, and F. Wang, “Electrical control of silicon photonic crystal cavity by graphene,” Nano Lett. 13(2), 515–518 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8

8. C. Xiong, C. Monat, A. S. Clark, C. Grillet, G. D. Marshall, M. J. Steel, J. Li, L. O’Faolain, T. F. Krauss, J. G. Rarity, and B. J. Eggleton, “Slow-light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide,” Opt. Lett. 36(17), 3413–3415 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Among various applications, controlling the spontaneous emission of excited atoms and molecules is attracting particular interests. Up to now, the modification of spontaneous emission by embedding luminescent species in the three-dimensional PCs, including organic dyes, semiconductors and RE ions has been widely studied and various phenomena have been observed, such as the modulation of PCs on spontaneous emission rate and ET process, Lamb shift and so on [9

9. K. Yoshino, S. B. Lee, S. Tatsuhara, Y. Kawagishi, M. Ozaki, and A. A. Zakhidov, “Observation of inhibited spontaneous emission and stimulated emission of rhodamine 6G in polymer replica of synthetic opal,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 73(24), 3506–3508 (1998). [CrossRef]

16

16. Y. S. Zhu, W. Xu, H. Z. Zhang, W. Wang, S. Xu, and H. W. Song, “Inhibited long-scale energy transfer in dysprosium doped yttrium vanadate inverse opal,” J. Phys. Chem. C 116(3), 2297–2302 (2012). [CrossRef]

].

On the other hand, the searching for efficient white light phosphors is of great significance in the field of lighting and display [17

17. A. S. Osvaldo, A. C. Simone, and R. I. J. Renata, “A new procedure to obtain Eu3+ doped oxide and oxosalt phosphors,” Alloys Compd. 303–304, 316–319 (2000).

]. White light can be traditionally generated by mixing blue, green, and red phosphors together. However, in a multiphase system, the luminescent efficiency is unavoidably affected due to the reabsorption of blue light by red and green phosphors [18

18. Y. H. Won, H. S. Jang, W. B. Im, D. Y. Jeon, and J. S. Lee, “Tunable full-color-emitting La0.827Al11.9O19.09: Eu2+,Mn2+ phosphor for application to warm white-light-emitting diodes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 89(23), 231909 (2006). [CrossRef]

, 19

19. D. Gao, H. Zheng, X. Zhang, W. Gao, Y. Tian, J. Li, and M. Cui, “Luminescence enhancement and quenching by codopant ions in lanthanide doped fluoride nanocrystals,” Nanotechnology 22(17), 175702 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. It is expected that more efficient white emission could be realized by a single phase phosphor with co-excited activators and some efforts have been contributed [20

20. C. H. Huang and T. M. Chen, “A novel single-composition trichromatic white-light Ca3Y(GaO)3(BO3)4:Ce3+,Mn2+,Tb3+ phosphor for UV-light emitting diodes,” J. Phys. Chem. C 115(5), 2349–2355 (2011). [CrossRef]

].

In this work, we demonstrate an efficient white light emission in Tm3+, Dy3+ and Eu3+ tri-doped YV1-xPxO4 IOPCs under the excitation of ultraviolet (UV) light. It is known that YVO4 is one of the most famous phosphors under UV excitation due to its outstanding physical and chemical stability, high thermal conductivity, large absorption cross-section and effective ET from VO43+ to RE ions [21

21. R. J. Wiglusz, A. Bednarkiewicz, and W. Strek, “Role of the sintering temperature and doping level in the structural and spectral properties of Eu-doped nanocrystalline YVO4.,” Inorg. Chem. 51(2), 1180–1186 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Through the suitable introduction of P element in the YVO4 host, the cross ET among VO43- groups can be suppressed, thus the ET from VO43- groups to RE ions becomes more effective [22

22. M. Yu, J. Lin, Y. H. Zhou, M. L. Pang, X. M. Han, and S. B. Wang, “Luminescence properties of RP1−xVxO4: A (R=Y, Gd, La; A=Sm3+, Er3+x=0, 0.5, 1) thin films prepared by Pechini sol–gel process,” Thin Solid Films 444(1-2), 245–253 (2003). [CrossRef]

]. In fact, RE ions triply doped method has been already used to realize white light emission [23

23. C. Lorbeer and A. V. Mudring, “White-light-emitting single phosphors via triply doped LaF3 nanoparticles,” J. Phys. Chem. C 117(23), 12229–12238 (2013). [CrossRef]

]. It is expected that in the YV1-xPxO4 IOPCs, by the modulation of IOPC structure, the unexpected cross ET among different RE ions could be further suppressed and the luminescent quantum efficiency could be improved. In this experiment, it is significant to realize efficient white light emissions in the tri-doped three-dimensional IOPCs and to observe considerably improved luminescent efficiency.

2. Experiments

All the YV1-xPxO4 IOPCs were prepared by the PMMA latex sphere template technique, similar to [13

13. Y. S. Zhu, Z. P. Sun, Z. Yin, H. W. Song, W. Xu, Y. F. Wang, L. G. Zhang, and H. Z. Zhang, “Self-assembly, highly modified spontaneous emission and energy transfer properties of LaPO4:Ce3+, Tb3+ inverse opals,” Dalton Trans. 42(22), 8049–8057 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 16

16. Y. S. Zhu, W. Xu, H. Z. Zhang, W. Wang, S. Xu, and H. W. Song, “Inhibited long-scale energy transfer in dysprosium doped yttrium vanadate inverse opal,” J. Phys. Chem. C 116(3), 2297–2302 (2012). [CrossRef]

]. PMMA template method has some advantages such as low cost of Methyl methacrylate (MMA), simple synthesis process and highly uniformed and dispersed of Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) spheres. YVO4 can be prepared by sol-gel method and the precursor solution can uniformly infiltrates into the space of PMMA sphere template. Thus, through PMMA template method, controllable thickness YVO4 IOPCs with different PSBs can be prepared easily. The PSBs of YV1-xPxO4 IOPCs were controlled by diameters of the PMMA latex spheres (The PSBs of the YV1-xPxO4 IOPCs measured in the normal direction located at 380, 478, 516, 570 and 615 nm and they were named as, PC1-PC5, respectively, in Fig. 3 and Fig. 4. The IOPCs used in Fig. 5 and Fig. 6 owned the PSBs at 615nm. All the IOPCs in this work were controlled with the same thickness). The REF samples were prepared by grinding the corresponding IOPCs to destroy the regular 3D structure. The experimental conditions for structure characterization and optical measurement have been described in detail in [16

16. Y. S. Zhu, W. Xu, H. Z. Zhang, W. Wang, S. Xu, and H. W. Song, “Inhibited long-scale energy transfer in dysprosium doped yttrium vanadate inverse opal,” J. Phys. Chem. C 116(3), 2297–2302 (2012). [CrossRef]

].

3. Results and discussions

Firstly, the structure of all the IOPCs and REF samples were characterized and compared. Figs. 1(a)
Fig. 1 The XRD patterns of YVxP1-xO4:Dy3+ PCs (a) and REF samples (b) with different x values (x = 0, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.1), and insets of (a) and (b) show the closeup of (200) reflection of the IOPCs and REF samples, respectively. (c) The SEM image of PC5. (d) The TEM image of PC5.
and 1(b) show the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the IOPCs and REF samples, respectively, in contrast to the standard card JCPDS 17-0341 for tetragonal YVO4. In Fig. 1(a), the broad band ranging of 15-40 degree comes from the diffraction of the glass substrate. The diffraction peaks at 2θ≈25° are due to the (200) reflection of YV1-xPxO4. No impurity peaks appear, implying that all YV1-xPxO4 samples are in pure tetragonal phase. The insert of Figs. 1(a) and 1(b) show that the diffraction peaks present a gradually shift towards higher 2θ values with the increasing of P concentration, owning to the decrease in unit cell parameters [24

24. C. H. Lu and R. Jagannathan, “Cerium-ion-doped yttrium aluminum garnet nanophosphors prepared through sol-gel pyrolysis for luminescent lighting,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 80(19), 3608–3610 (2002). [CrossRef]

]. As a typical case, the SEM and TEM images of PC5 are shown in Figs. 1(c) and 1(d), respectively. The SEM image shows that the PC5 sample yields a long-range ordered hexagonal arrangement of IOPC, and the center-to-center distance of the IOPC is 338 nm. The TEM image shows that the wall thickness of the IOPC is about 10 nm, which consists of a large amount of small nanoparticles (NPs). The structure characteristics of the other IOPCs are similar to PC5 except the change of IOPC center to center distance. Figure 2
Fig. 2 The EDS spectra of YV0.95P0.05O4: Dy3+ IOPC.
shows the EDS spectra of the YV0.95P0.05O4: Dy3+ IOPC. It shows that Y, V, P, and O elements all exist in the sample and this is the direct experimental evidence to prove the P element in the YVO4 host.

Figure 3
Fig. 3 The transmittance of PC2 (a), PC3 (b), PC4 (c), PC5 (d), and the steady-state emission spectra (ex = 280nm) of PC2 (a), PC3 (b), PC4 (c), PC5 (d) in contrast with that of PC1 (the black line in (a)-(d)).
shows the transmittance spectra with different PSBs at normal (θ = 0°) and the corresponding steady-state emission spectra in the Y0.986V0.95P0.05O4: Tm3+0.008Dy3+0.004Eu3+0.002 IOPCs . It can be seen that the PC2 displays a PSB centering at 478 nm, corresponding to the 1G4-3H6 transition of Tm3+ and the 4F9/2-6H15/2 transition of Dy3+. PC3 demonstrates a PSB at 516 nm, which is nearby the 1G4-3H6/4F9/2-6H15/2 transition. The PC4 and PC5 display PSBs centering at 570 nm and 615 nm, overlapping with the 4F9/2-6H13/2 transition of Dy3+ and the 5D0-7F2 transition of Eu3+, respectively. From the steady-state emission spectra, when the emission wavelength locates on the center of PSBs, a significant inhibition of luminescent intensity can be observed in contrast to PC1, which displays a PSB centering at 380nm and is far away from all the emissions. The inhibition of light emission is an universal phenomenon for luminescent species embedded in PCs [12

12. Y. S. Zhu, W. Xu, H. Z. Zhang, W. Wang, L. Tong, S. Xu, Z. P. Sun, and H. W. Song, “Highly modified spontaneous emissions in YVO4:Eu3+ inverse opal and refractive index sensing application,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 100(8), 081104 (2012). [CrossRef]

, 16

16. Y. S. Zhu, W. Xu, H. Z. Zhang, W. Wang, S. Xu, and H. W. Song, “Inhibited long-scale energy transfer in dysprosium doped yttrium vanadate inverse opal,” J. Phys. Chem. C 116(3), 2297–2302 (2012). [CrossRef]

]. Suppression of the emission can be understood as being due to the reduction in the number of opticalmodes available for photonpropagation at frequencies within the PSB [25

25. G. von Freymann, V. Kitaev, B. V. Lotsch, and G. A. Ozin, “Bottom-up assembly of photonic crystals,” Chem. Soc. Rev. 42(7), 2528–2554 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. It can be seen from Figs. 3(b) and 3(d), when the emission wavelength locates on the edge of PSBs, a weak enhancement of luminescent intensity is distinguished, owing to the improvement in the number of opticalmodes on the edge of PSBs [15

15. C. Blum, A. P. Mosk, I. S. Nikolaev, V. Subramaniam, and W. L. Vos, “Color control of natural fluorescent proteins by photonic crystals,” Small 4(4), 492–496 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 26

26. S. Fan, P. R. Villeneuve, J. D. Joannopoulos, and E. F. Schubert, “High extraction efficiency of spontaneous emission from slabs of photonic crystals,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 78(17), 3294–3297 (1997). [CrossRef]

]. It should be highlighted that besides the transition of RE ions, the broad band emission ranging of 400-450nm originating from vanadate groups can be also observed, which cannot be observed in YVO4: Dy3+ IOPCs [16

16. Y. S. Zhu, W. Xu, H. Z. Zhang, W. Wang, S. Xu, and H. W. Song, “Inhibited long-scale energy transfer in dysprosium doped yttrium vanadate inverse opal,” J. Phys. Chem. C 116(3), 2297–2302 (2012). [CrossRef]

]. This is the direct evidence that the ET process from vanadate groups to defects is suppressed by the doping of P element.

Figure 4
Fig. 4 The CIE chromaticity coordinates diagram of Y0.986V0.95P0.05O4: Tm3+0.008Dy3+0.004Eu3+0.002 IOPCs with different PSBs. Inset is the detail information.
shows the CIE chromaticity coordinates diagram and correlated color temperature (CCT) (inset of Fig. 4) of Y0.986V0.95P0.05O4: Tm3+0.008Dy3+0.004Eu3+0.002 IOPCs with different PSBs. As is shown in the inset of Fig. 4, when the PSB locates at 478 nm, the blue emission is suppressed and a warm white light (CCT = 4192K) can be obtained. When the PSB locates at 570 nm, yellow emission is suppressed and a cold white light (CCT = 6966K) can be realized. Overall, the conversion between warm white and cold white light can be accurately modulated through the PSB effect of IOPCs. Thus, it is expected that IOPC-based white-light sources could be widely used in art exhibition and scene arrangement.

Based on the luminescent dynamics of Tm3+, the ET efficiency from Tm3+ to Dy3+ can be roughly estimated by:
η=1τTm1τTm2,
(1)
where η is the ET efficiency, τTm1 is the lifetime constant of Tm3+ with Dy3+ doping, and τTm2 is the lifetime constant of Tm3+ without Dy3+ doping. The inset of Fig. 5 shows the deduced dependence of ET efficiency from Tm3+ to Dy3+ in the IOPCs and REF samples. As is shown in the inset, the ET efficiency of Tm3+ to Dy3+ in the REF samples increases rapidly with the increasing doping concentration of Dy3+, but the ET efficiency in the IOPCs increases more slowly. This is because, in IOPCs, a high surface-to-volume ratio can effectively increase the chance that photons come into the air and the periodic dielectric cavity acts as a local resonance mode for the emission propagation. Photons can couple to the local resonance mode and scatter out of the structure [28

28. H. Li, J. X. Wang, H. Lin, L. Xu, W. Xu, R. M. Wang, Y. L. Song, and D. B. Zhu, “Amplification of fluorescent contrast by photonic crystals in optical storage,” Adv. Mater. 22(11), 1237–1241 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Thus, more energy of excited Tm3+ could be converted to light in IOPCs, and the unexpected nonradiative process of Tm3+ and the ET process from Tm3+ to Dy3+ could be suppressed. Note that the white emission and ET between Tm3+ and Dy3+ ions were reported in [29

29. X. Wang, X. H. Yan, Y. Y. Bu, J. Zhen, and Y. Xuan, “Fabrication, photoluminescence, and potential application in white light emitting diode of Dy3+-Tm3+ doped transparent glass ceramics containing GdSr2F7 nanocrystals,” Appl. Phys., A Mater. Sci. Process. 112(2), 317–322 (2013). [CrossRef]

], which tuned the chrominance and luminescent intensity through the doping concentration of Tm3+ and Dy3+. In this work, IOPC structure was used and the chrominance could be largely modulated between warm white and cold white light by the PSB of the IOPCs. Besides, the ET between Tm3+ and Dy3+ could be suppressed by using IOPC structure and the luminescent quantum efficiency could be improved.

The PL quantum yield (QY) of YV1-xPxO4:Dy3+ IOPCs (PSBs located at 615nm) and REF (grinding the corresponding IOPCs with the same thickness) samples were measured with a fluorescence spectrophotometer equipped with a BaSO4 integrated sphere similar to [30

30. J. C. de Mello, H. F. Wittmann, and R. H. Friend, “An improved experimental determination of external photoluminescence quantum efficiency,” Adv. Mater. 9(3), 230–232 (1997). [CrossRef]

] and the result as shown in Fig. 6
Fig. 6 The PL quantum yield of YV1-xPxO4:Dy3+ (x = 0, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07, 0.1) PCs (red bar) and REF samples (blue bar). Inset: the decay time constant of Dy3+ in YV1-xPXO4:Dy3+ (x = 0, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07, 0.1) PCs (red line) and REF samples (black line).
. It can be observed that the PL quantum yield first increases with the increasing of x value (x = 0-0.05) both in the IOPCs and REF samples, and then decreases with the further increase of x value (x = 0.05-0.1). As mentioned above, luminescent quenching will inevitably happen due to the ET from VO43- groups to defect states because of the existence of long-term resonant ET among VO43- groups. The replacement of a part of VO43- by PO43- can prevent this ET process, leading to the initial increase of QY. With the further increase of PO43-, the ET process can be suppressed not only from VO43- groups to defects, but also from VO43- groups to the RE ions, resulting in the decrease of QY.

In order to prove this viewpoint, the decay time constants of Dy3+ in YV1-xPxO4:Dy3+ (x = 0, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07, and 0.1) IOPCs and REF samples were measured. As shown in the inset of Fig. 6, Whether in IOPCs or REF samples, the decay time constants of Dy3+ rarely change with P concentration. This result implies that the change of QY with P concentration is mainly due to ET process from VO43- groups to Dy3+ as well as the other RE ions. In Fig. 6, it is exciting to observe that the PL quantum yield of IOPCs was considerably improved than that of REF samples. Because in the inverse opals, the long-range ET among VO43- groups should be restrained largely due to the thin thickness of each YV1-xPxO4 layer and the existence of a long periodic air cavity between the two layers.

4. Conclusions

In conclusion, tri-doped YV1-xPxO4: RE3+ (RE = Tm, Dy, Eu) IOPCs were fabricated by the PMMA template method. As x = 0.05, both YV1-xPxO4: RE3+ IOPCs and REF samples demonstrated a maximum PL quantum yield. Using the IOPC structure, the unexpected ET process was effectively restrained and the PL quantum yield was considerably increased. Meanwhile, the color conversion between warm white and cold white light was modulated by the PSB effect of PCs. Overall, YV1-xPxO4:RE3+ (RE = Tm, Dy, Eu) IOPCs have a remarkable application prospect in the field of white-light source.

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by National Talent Youth Science Foundation of China (Grant no. 60925018), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant no. 61204015, 51002062, 11174111, 61177042, and 81201738), funding from the State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics of Southeast University.

References and links

1.

E. Yablonovitch, “Inhibited spontaneous emission in solid-state physics and electronics,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 58(20), 2059–2062 (1987). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

2.

S. John, “Strong localization of photons in certain disordered dielectric superlattices,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 58(23), 2486–2489 (1987). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

A. Majumdar, J. Kim, J. Vuckovic, and F. Wang, “Electrical control of silicon photonic crystal cavity by graphene,” Nano Lett. 13(2), 515–518 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

N. Matsuda, H. Takesue, K. Shimizu, Y. Tokura, E. Kuramochi, and M. Notomi, “Slow light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in photonic-crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguides,” Opt. Express 21(7), 8596–8604 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

F. Raineri, T. J. Karle, V. Roppo, P. Monnier, and R. Raj, “Time-domain mapping of nonlinear pulse propagation in photonic-crystal slow-light waveguides,” Phys. Rev. A 87(4), 041802 (2013). [CrossRef]

6.

V. Liu, D. A. B. Miller, and S. H. Fan, “Ultra-compact photonic crystal waveguide spatial mode converter and its connection to the optical diode effect,” Opt. Express 20(27), 28388–28397 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

A. Hosseini, X. C. Xu, H. Subbaraman, C. Y. Lin, S. Rahimi, and R. T. Chen, “Large optical spectral range dispersion engineered silicon-based photonic crystal waveguide modulator,” Opt. Express 20(11), 12318–12325 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

C. Xiong, C. Monat, A. S. Clark, C. Grillet, G. D. Marshall, M. J. Steel, J. Li, L. O’Faolain, T. F. Krauss, J. G. Rarity, and B. J. Eggleton, “Slow-light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide,” Opt. Lett. 36(17), 3413–3415 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9.

K. Yoshino, S. B. Lee, S. Tatsuhara, Y. Kawagishi, M. Ozaki, and A. A. Zakhidov, “Observation of inhibited spontaneous emission and stimulated emission of rhodamine 6G in polymer replica of synthetic opal,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 73(24), 3506–3508 (1998). [CrossRef]

10.

P. Lodahl, A. Floris Van Driel, I. S. Nikolaev, A. Irman, K. Overgaag, D. L. Vanmaekelbergh, and W. L. Vos, “Controlling the dynamics of spontaneous emission from quantum dots by photonic crystals,” Nature 430(7000), 654–657 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

A. Rodenas, G. Zhou, D. Jaque, and M. Gu, “Rare-earth spontaneous emission control in three-dimensional lithium niobate photonic crystals,” Adv. Mater. 21(34), 3526–3530 (2009). [CrossRef]

12.

Y. S. Zhu, W. Xu, H. Z. Zhang, W. Wang, L. Tong, S. Xu, Z. P. Sun, and H. W. Song, “Highly modified spontaneous emissions in YVO4:Eu3+ inverse opal and refractive index sensing application,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 100(8), 081104 (2012). [CrossRef]

13.

Y. S. Zhu, Z. P. Sun, Z. Yin, H. W. Song, W. Xu, Y. F. Wang, L. G. Zhang, and H. Z. Zhang, “Self-assembly, highly modified spontaneous emission and energy transfer properties of LaPO4:Ce3+, Tb3+ inverse opals,” Dalton Trans. 42(22), 8049–8057 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

Q. Liu, H. W. Song, W. Wang, X. Bai, Y. Wang, B. Dong, L. Xu, and W. Han, “Observation of Lamb shift and modified spontaneous emission dynamics in the YBO3:Eu3+ inverse opal,” Opt. Lett. 35(17), 2898–2900 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

15.

C. Blum, A. P. Mosk, I. S. Nikolaev, V. Subramaniam, and W. L. Vos, “Color control of natural fluorescent proteins by photonic crystals,” Small 4(4), 492–496 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

Y. S. Zhu, W. Xu, H. Z. Zhang, W. Wang, S. Xu, and H. W. Song, “Inhibited long-scale energy transfer in dysprosium doped yttrium vanadate inverse opal,” J. Phys. Chem. C 116(3), 2297–2302 (2012). [CrossRef]

17.

A. S. Osvaldo, A. C. Simone, and R. I. J. Renata, “A new procedure to obtain Eu3+ doped oxide and oxosalt phosphors,” Alloys Compd. 303–304, 316–319 (2000).

18.

Y. H. Won, H. S. Jang, W. B. Im, D. Y. Jeon, and J. S. Lee, “Tunable full-color-emitting La0.827Al11.9O19.09: Eu2+,Mn2+ phosphor for application to warm white-light-emitting diodes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 89(23), 231909 (2006). [CrossRef]

19.

D. Gao, H. Zheng, X. Zhang, W. Gao, Y. Tian, J. Li, and M. Cui, “Luminescence enhancement and quenching by codopant ions in lanthanide doped fluoride nanocrystals,” Nanotechnology 22(17), 175702 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

20.

C. H. Huang and T. M. Chen, “A novel single-composition trichromatic white-light Ca3Y(GaO)3(BO3)4:Ce3+,Mn2+,Tb3+ phosphor for UV-light emitting diodes,” J. Phys. Chem. C 115(5), 2349–2355 (2011). [CrossRef]

21.

R. J. Wiglusz, A. Bednarkiewicz, and W. Strek, “Role of the sintering temperature and doping level in the structural and spectral properties of Eu-doped nanocrystalline YVO4.,” Inorg. Chem. 51(2), 1180–1186 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

22.

M. Yu, J. Lin, Y. H. Zhou, M. L. Pang, X. M. Han, and S. B. Wang, “Luminescence properties of RP1−xVxO4: A (R=Y, Gd, La; A=Sm3+, Er3+x=0, 0.5, 1) thin films prepared by Pechini sol–gel process,” Thin Solid Films 444(1-2), 245–253 (2003). [CrossRef]

23.

C. Lorbeer and A. V. Mudring, “White-light-emitting single phosphors via triply doped LaF3 nanoparticles,” J. Phys. Chem. C 117(23), 12229–12238 (2013). [CrossRef]

24.

C. H. Lu and R. Jagannathan, “Cerium-ion-doped yttrium aluminum garnet nanophosphors prepared through sol-gel pyrolysis for luminescent lighting,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 80(19), 3608–3610 (2002). [CrossRef]

25.

G. von Freymann, V. Kitaev, B. V. Lotsch, and G. A. Ozin, “Bottom-up assembly of photonic crystals,” Chem. Soc. Rev. 42(7), 2528–2554 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

26.

S. Fan, P. R. Villeneuve, J. D. Joannopoulos, and E. F. Schubert, “High extraction efficiency of spontaneous emission from slabs of photonic crystals,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 78(17), 3294–3297 (1997). [CrossRef]

27.

L. P. Xie, H. W. Song, Y. Wang, W. Xu, X. Bai, and B. Dong, “Influence of concentration effect and Au coating on photoluminescence properties of YVO4:Eu3+ NPs colloids,” J. Phys. Chem. C 114(21), 9975–9980 (2010). [CrossRef]

28.

H. Li, J. X. Wang, H. Lin, L. Xu, W. Xu, R. M. Wang, Y. L. Song, and D. B. Zhu, “Amplification of fluorescent contrast by photonic crystals in optical storage,” Adv. Mater. 22(11), 1237–1241 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

29.

X. Wang, X. H. Yan, Y. Y. Bu, J. Zhen, and Y. Xuan, “Fabrication, photoluminescence, and potential application in white light emitting diode of Dy3+-Tm3+ doped transparent glass ceramics containing GdSr2F7 nanocrystals,” Appl. Phys., A Mater. Sci. Process. 112(2), 317–322 (2013). [CrossRef]

30.

J. C. de Mello, H. F. Wittmann, and R. H. Friend, “An improved experimental determination of external photoluminescence quantum efficiency,” Adv. Mater. 9(3), 230–232 (1997). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(250.0250) Optoelectronics : Optoelectronics
(300.0300) Spectroscopy : Spectroscopy

ToC Category:
Optoelectronics

History
Original Manuscript: September 10, 2013
Revised Manuscript: October 3, 2013
Manuscript Accepted: October 4, 2013
Published: October 21, 2013

Citation
Pingwei Zhou, Yongsheng Zhu, Wen Xu, Lin Xu, and Hongwei Song, "Controllable chrominance and highly improved luminescent quantum yield of YV1-xPxO4: Tm, Dy, Eu inverse opal white light phosphors," Opt. Express 21, 25744-25751 (2013)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-21-22-25744


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. E. Yablonovitch, “Inhibited spontaneous emission in solid-state physics and electronics,” Phys. Rev. Lett.58(20), 2059–2062 (1987). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. S. John, “Strong localization of photons in certain disordered dielectric superlattices,” Phys. Rev. Lett.58(23), 2486–2489 (1987). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. A. Majumdar, J. Kim, J. Vuckovic, and F. Wang, “Electrical control of silicon photonic crystal cavity by graphene,” Nano Lett.13(2), 515–518 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. N. Matsuda, H. Takesue, K. Shimizu, Y. Tokura, E. Kuramochi, and M. Notomi, “Slow light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in photonic-crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguides,” Opt. Express21(7), 8596–8604 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. F. Raineri, T. J. Karle, V. Roppo, P. Monnier, and R. Raj, “Time-domain mapping of nonlinear pulse propagation in photonic-crystal slow-light waveguides,” Phys. Rev. A87(4), 041802 (2013). [CrossRef]
  6. V. Liu, D. A. B. Miller, and S. H. Fan, “Ultra-compact photonic crystal waveguide spatial mode converter and its connection to the optical diode effect,” Opt. Express20(27), 28388–28397 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. A. Hosseini, X. C. Xu, H. Subbaraman, C. Y. Lin, S. Rahimi, and R. T. Chen, “Large optical spectral range dispersion engineered silicon-based photonic crystal waveguide modulator,” Opt. Express20(11), 12318–12325 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  8. C. Xiong, C. Monat, A. S. Clark, C. Grillet, G. D. Marshall, M. J. Steel, J. Li, L. O’Faolain, T. F. Krauss, J. G. Rarity, and B. J. Eggleton, “Slow-light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide,” Opt. Lett.36(17), 3413–3415 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  9. K. Yoshino, S. B. Lee, S. Tatsuhara, Y. Kawagishi, M. Ozaki, and A. A. Zakhidov, “Observation of inhibited spontaneous emission and stimulated emission of rhodamine 6G in polymer replica of synthetic opal,” Appl. Phys. Lett.73(24), 3506–3508 (1998). [CrossRef]
  10. P. Lodahl, A. Floris Van Driel, I. S. Nikolaev, A. Irman, K. Overgaag, D. L. Vanmaekelbergh, and W. L. Vos, “Controlling the dynamics of spontaneous emission from quantum dots by photonic crystals,” Nature430(7000), 654–657 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. A. Rodenas, G. Zhou, D. Jaque, and M. Gu, “Rare-earth spontaneous emission control in three-dimensional lithium niobate photonic crystals,” Adv. Mater.21(34), 3526–3530 (2009). [CrossRef]
  12. Y. S. Zhu, W. Xu, H. Z. Zhang, W. Wang, L. Tong, S. Xu, Z. P. Sun, and H. W. Song, “Highly modified spontaneous emissions in YVO4:Eu3+ inverse opal and refractive index sensing application,” Appl. Phys. Lett.100(8), 081104 (2012). [CrossRef]
  13. Y. S. Zhu, Z. P. Sun, Z. Yin, H. W. Song, W. Xu, Y. F. Wang, L. G. Zhang, and H. Z. Zhang, “Self-assembly, highly modified spontaneous emission and energy transfer properties of LaPO4:Ce3+, Tb3+ inverse opals,” Dalton Trans.42(22), 8049–8057 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  14. Q. Liu, H. W. Song, W. Wang, X. Bai, Y. Wang, B. Dong, L. Xu, and W. Han, “Observation of Lamb shift and modified spontaneous emission dynamics in the YBO3:Eu3+ inverse opal,” Opt. Lett.35(17), 2898–2900 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  15. C. Blum, A. P. Mosk, I. S. Nikolaev, V. Subramaniam, and W. L. Vos, “Color control of natural fluorescent proteins by photonic crystals,” Small4(4), 492–496 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  16. Y. S. Zhu, W. Xu, H. Z. Zhang, W. Wang, S. Xu, and H. W. Song, “Inhibited long-scale energy transfer in dysprosium doped yttrium vanadate inverse opal,” J. Phys. Chem. C116(3), 2297–2302 (2012). [CrossRef]
  17. A. S. Osvaldo, A. C. Simone, and R. I. J. Renata, “A new procedure to obtain Eu3+ doped oxide and oxosalt phosphors,” Alloys Compd.303–304, 316–319 (2000).
  18. Y. H. Won, H. S. Jang, W. B. Im, D. Y. Jeon, and J. S. Lee, “Tunable full-color-emitting La0.827Al11.9O19.09: Eu2+,Mn2+ phosphor for application to warm white-light-emitting diodes,” Appl. Phys. Lett.89(23), 231909 (2006). [CrossRef]
  19. D. Gao, H. Zheng, X. Zhang, W. Gao, Y. Tian, J. Li, and M. Cui, “Luminescence enhancement and quenching by codopant ions in lanthanide doped fluoride nanocrystals,” Nanotechnology22(17), 175702 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  20. C. H. Huang and T. M. Chen, “A novel single-composition trichromatic white-light Ca3Y(GaO)3(BO3)4:Ce3+,Mn2+,Tb3+ phosphor for UV-light emitting diodes,” J. Phys. Chem. C115(5), 2349–2355 (2011). [CrossRef]
  21. R. J. Wiglusz, A. Bednarkiewicz, and W. Strek, “Role of the sintering temperature and doping level in the structural and spectral properties of Eu-doped nanocrystalline YVO4.,” Inorg. Chem.51(2), 1180–1186 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  22. M. Yu, J. Lin, Y. H. Zhou, M. L. Pang, X. M. Han, and S. B. Wang, “Luminescence properties of RP1−xVxO4: A (R=Y, Gd, La; A=Sm3+, Er3+x=0, 0.5, 1) thin films prepared by Pechini sol–gel process,” Thin Solid Films444(1-2), 245–253 (2003). [CrossRef]
  23. C. Lorbeer and A. V. Mudring, “White-light-emitting single phosphors via triply doped LaF3 nanoparticles,” J. Phys. Chem. C117(23), 12229–12238 (2013). [CrossRef]
  24. C. H. Lu and R. Jagannathan, “Cerium-ion-doped yttrium aluminum garnet nanophosphors prepared through sol-gel pyrolysis for luminescent lighting,” Appl. Phys. Lett.80(19), 3608–3610 (2002). [CrossRef]
  25. G. von Freymann, V. Kitaev, B. V. Lotsch, and G. A. Ozin, “Bottom-up assembly of photonic crystals,” Chem. Soc. Rev.42(7), 2528–2554 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  26. S. Fan, P. R. Villeneuve, J. D. Joannopoulos, and E. F. Schubert, “High extraction efficiency of spontaneous emission from slabs of photonic crystals,” Phys. Rev. Lett.78(17), 3294–3297 (1997). [CrossRef]
  27. L. P. Xie, H. W. Song, Y. Wang, W. Xu, X. Bai, and B. Dong, “Influence of concentration effect and Au coating on photoluminescence properties of YVO4:Eu3+ NPs colloids,” J. Phys. Chem. C114(21), 9975–9980 (2010). [CrossRef]
  28. H. Li, J. X. Wang, H. Lin, L. Xu, W. Xu, R. M. Wang, Y. L. Song, and D. B. Zhu, “Amplification of fluorescent contrast by photonic crystals in optical storage,” Adv. Mater.22(11), 1237–1241 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  29. X. Wang, X. H. Yan, Y. Y. Bu, J. Zhen, and Y. Xuan, “Fabrication, photoluminescence, and potential application in white light emitting diode of Dy3+-Tm3+ doped transparent glass ceramics containing GdSr2F7 nanocrystals,” Appl. Phys., A Mater. Sci. Process.112(2), 317–322 (2013). [CrossRef]
  30. J. C. de Mello, H. F. Wittmann, and R. H. Friend, “An improved experimental determination of external photoluminescence quantum efficiency,” Adv. Mater.9(3), 230–232 (1997). [CrossRef]

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.


« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited