OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: Andrew M. Weiner
  • Vol. 21, Iss. 23 — Nov. 18, 2013
  • pp: 27835–27840
« Show journal navigation

Regulation of structure rigidity for improvement of the thermal stability of near-infrared luminescence in Bi-doped borate glasses

Qiangbing Guo, Beibei Xu, Dezhi Tan, Juechen Wang, Shuhong Zheng, Wei Jiang, Jianrong Qiu, and Shifeng Zhou  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 21, Issue 23, pp. 27835-27840 (2013)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.21.027835


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (1525 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

The effect of heat-treatment on the near-infrared (NIR) luminescence properties was studied in Bi-doped borate glasses. The luminescence intensity generally decreases with the increase of temperature, and the thermal stability can be improved by nearly 4.5 times with addition of 5 mol% La2O3. Collaborative studies by using steady photoluminescence (PL) and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra, luminescence decay curve, differential thermal analysis (DTA), Raman spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicate that the luminescence decrement is associated with the agglomeration of Bi active centers during heat-treatment. The improvement of the thermal stability of NIR luminescence with the addition of La2O3 is benefited from the enhancement of structure rigidity due to the strong cationic field strength of La3+. The results not only provide valuable guidance for suppressing performance degradation of Bi-doped glass during fiber drawing process, but also present an effective way to control the luminescence properties of main group elements in glasses from the perspective of glass structure.

© 2013 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

With the rapid growth of information demand, which will reach 100-1000 Pbit/s per fiber in 20 years, it’s a big challenge for the present optical fiber communication system to realize a super-big-capacity optical communication. One of the approaches that have been proposed is widening the spectral region for the information transmission [1

1. E. M. Dianov, “Amplification in extended transmission bands using bismuth-doped optical fibers,” J. Lightwave Technol. 31(4), 681–688 (2013). [CrossRef]

], for example, effort has been done to broaden the presently widely used rare-earth ions doped fiber amplifiers’ amplification bandwidth. Although some valuable results have been obtained [2

2. B. Zhou, L. Tao, Y. H. Tsang, W. Jin, and E. Y. Pun, “Superbroadband near-IR photoluminescence from Pr3+-doped fluorotellurite glasses,” Opt. Express 20(4), 3803–3813 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], the potential of this route is still limited due to the native luminescence nature of 4f-4f electronic transition of rare-earth ions, therefore leaving most of the optical fiber’s low optical loss spectra region of 1300-1700 nm being not used [1

1. E. M. Dianov, “Amplification in extended transmission bands using bismuth-doped optical fibers,” J. Lightwave Technol. 31(4), 681–688 (2013). [CrossRef]

, 3

3. I. A. Bufetov and E. M. Dianov, “Bi-doped fiber lasers,” Laser Phys. Lett. 6(7), 487–504 (2009). [CrossRef]

].

2. Experimental

The glass samples with the compositions of 75B2O3-20BaO-5Al2O3-1Bi2O3 (0La) and 75B2O3-15BaO-5La2O3-5Al2O3-1Bi2O3 (5La) (in mol%) were prepared by the conventional melting-quenching technique. Analytical grade reagents H3BO3, BaCO3, Al2O3, La2O3 and Bi2O3 were used as raw materials. 30 g batches were mixed homogeneously and then melted in a corundum crucible at 1550 °C for 20 min in air and then cast onto a stainless steel plate. The obtained glasses were cut into pieces. Then the glass samples were heat-treated at different temperatures between 400 and 700 °C for 2 hours and polished into slices of an appropriate size with a thickness of 1.5 mm for optical measurements.

The photoluminescence (PL) spectra were recorded using a ZOLIX SBP300 spectrophotometer with an InGaAs detector excited by 800 nm LD. The differential thermal analysis (DTA) was carried out by a CRY-Z Differential Thermal Analyzer at a heating rate of 10 °C/min. The photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra and luminescence decay curves were recorded by a FLS920 fluorescence spectrophotometer (Edinburgh Instrument Ltd, UK). The structure of the glasses was analyzed with a Raman spectrometer (Jobin Yvon Corp., France) using 514.5 nm radiation from an argon ion laser for excitation. Since the Bi centers have a strong absorption around 514 nm and small amounts of Bi exert little effect on the glass structure, the Raman spectra were performed on corresponding Bi free glasses. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was carried out on a D/MAX-2550pc diffractometer with Cu Kα as the incident radiation source. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on a FEG-TEM (Tecnai G2 F30 S-Twin, Philips-FEI, Netherlands). All the measurements were performed at ambient atmosphere.

3. Results and discussion

Thermal properties of the glass were measured by DTA, and the glass transition temperature (Tg) of samples 0La and 5La were estimated to be around 588 °C and 593 °C, respectively. A slight increment of Tg with the addition of La2O3 indicates the enhancement of the rigidity of glass structure. This results from the relative strong cationic field strength of La3+ ions (CFSLa3+ = 2.67 A−2) which is beneficial for stabilization of glass structure.

Fig. 1 Photoluminescence spectra of the glass samples 0La (a) and 5La (b) before and after heat-treatment when excited by an 800 nm LD, (c) dependence of the NIR luminescence intensity on the heat-treatment temperatures. The insets show the corresponding photographs of the glass samples heat-treated at various temperatures.
PL spectra were measured to study the effect of heat-treatment conditions on the luminescence properties of the two glass samples under excitation with an 800 nm LD, as is depicted in Figs. 1(a) and 1(b). It can be observed that both glass samples show broad emission with the central wavelength at around 1250 nm. Upon heat-treatment at 690 °C for 2 h, NIR luminescence of sample without La2O3 (0La) almost disappears, while the glass sample with La2O3 (5La) shows a different scenario which only decreases about half.

We further systematically investigate the effect of heat-treatment conditions on the NIR emission of the glasses, both samples were heat-treated at different temperatures and their optical properties were investigated. From the insets of Fig. 1(c), it can be observed that the color of these glasses gradually become dark with the increasing heat-treatment temperature and the color change of sample 0La is more obvious. The NIR luminescence intensity as a function of heat-treatment temperature is shown in Fig. 1(c). Both samples experience emission loss at around Tg. The NIR emission intensity of glass 0La decreases nearly 88% when heat-treated at 690 °C for 2 h. In contrast, the luminescence degradation of glass with La2O3 is suppressed and the luminescence decrement of sample 5La is estimated to be around 46%. Thus, the thermal stability of luminescence can be improved by nearly 4.5 times with addition of 5 mol% La2O3. In a further study, we found that with La2O3 up to 10 mol%, the emission intensity after heat-treatment is comparable to that of the as-made sample.

To expound the possible transformation mechanism of Bi active center in the glass matrix and reveal the differences in thermal stability of NIR luminescence between glass 0La and 5La, Raman spectra were measured to analyze the structure of these two glasses.
Fig. 3 (a) Raman spectra of as-made glass 0La and 5La. Inset is the amplified spectrum region from 755 to 790 cm−1, (b) schematic illustration of transformation mechanism of Bi active centers in glass 0La and 5La, and (c) XRD pattern and TEM photograph of glass 0La.
As shown in Fig. 3(a), the intense peak at 798 cm−1 is assigned to the symmetric ring-breathing vibration of the boroxol ring [28

28. E. I. Kamitsos and G. D. Chryssikos, “Borate glass structure by raman and infrared spectroscopies,” J. Mol. Struct. 247, 1–16 (1991). [CrossRef]

]. Peak at ~663 cm−1 is attributed to stretching of metaborate [BO2]- [29

29. M. Sharada and D. Suresh Babu, “Spectroscopic studies of tantalum doped borate glasses,” Phys. B 407(19), 3945–3955 (2012). [CrossRef]

], and the band near 723 cm−1 belongs to the bending vibrations of three coordinated boron units [28

28. E. I. Kamitsos and G. D. Chryssikos, “Borate glass structure by raman and infrared spectroscopies,” J. Mol. Struct. 247, 1–16 (1991). [CrossRef]

]. The origin of Raman band at ~1215 cm−1 is ascribed to the stretching modes of [BO3] triangular units [30

30. H. Fan, G. Gao, G. Wang, and L. Hu, “Infrared, Raman and XPS spectroscopic studies of Bi2O3-B2O3-GeO2 glasses,” Solid State Sci. 12(4), 541–545 (2010). [CrossRef]

], while the vibrational modes of B-O- terminal bonds of [BO3] metaborate triangles contribute to the high-frequency Raman envelop (1350-1600 cm−1) [31

31. A. A. Osipov and L. M. Osipova, “Raman scattering study of barium borate glasses and melts,” J. Phys. Chem. Solids 74(7), 971–978 (2013). [CrossRef]

]. Another peak at ~900 cm−1 can be assigned to the symmetric stretching vibration of the planar orthoborate units [32

32. M. Monika, M. Falconieri, S. Baccaro, G. Sharma, K. S. Thind, and D. P. Singh, “Role of aluminium oxide in the structure of heavy metal oxide borosilicate glasses,” Phys. Status Solidi A 209(8), 1438–1444 (2012). [CrossRef]

]. According to literature [29

29. M. Sharada and D. Suresh Babu, “Spectroscopic studies of tantalum doped borate glasses,” Phys. B 407(19), 3945–3955 (2012). [CrossRef]

], peaks at around 477 cm−1 and 767 cm−1 can be ascribed to the symmetric breathing vibrations of six-membered rings with one BO4 tetrahedron and ring type metaborate groups. From the inset of Fig. 3(a), peak at around 767 cm−1 is more prominent in glass 5La than that in glass 0La, demonstrating a relative higher content of BO4 tetrahedron groups in glass 5La. The successful introduction of rich BO4 tetrahedron groups with the addition of La2O3 may lead to more rigid glass structure. This is highly beneficial for stabilization of Bi active centers and suppression of NIR emission degradation.

The transformation mechanism of Bi active centers and the improvement of thermal stability can also be understood based on the topological constraint theory [33

33. M. M. Smedskjaer, J. C. Mauro, and Y. Yue, “Prediction of glass hardness using temperature-dependent constraint theory,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 105(11), 115503 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. As shown in the schematic diagram of Fig. 3(b), for glass without La2O3, when heat-treated at temperature above Tg, there is ample thermal energy to overcome the bond constraints, and the network becomes floppy. As a result, the Bi ions distributed inside the glass network can easily migrate to form Bi metallic colloid through the ‘microchannel’ formed during the crack of the floppy network at high temperature. And this formation process of Bi-colloid can be directly evidenced by XRD and TEM analysis of glass 0La before and after heat-treatment [34

34. S. Zhou, W. Lei, N. Jiang, J. Hao, E. Wu, H. Zeng, and J. Qiu, “Space-selective control of luminescence inside the Bi-doped mesoporous silica glass by a femtosecond laser,” J. Mater. Chem. 19(26), 4603–4608 (2009). [CrossRef]

], see Fig. 3(c). In contrast, the glass with La2O3 has a relative more rigid network and becomes more difficult to get floppy. More specifically, due to the large cationic field strength and high coordination number of La3+ ions (CFSLa3+ = 2.67 A−2) compared with Ba2+ ions (CFSBa2+ = 1.11 A−2), the mobility of the floppy network at high temperature is restricted to a certain degree, and the ‘microchannel’ big enough to transit Bi ions is harder to form, which, in turn, imposes restrictions on the migration of Bi ions, including the Bi NIR luminescence active centers, which is shown in the lower part of Fig. 3(b). Consequently, the glass with La2O3 presents higher thermal stability of NIR luminescence than that of the glass without La2O3.

4. Conclusion

In summary, we systematically studied the heat-treatment temperature dependent NIR luminescence in Bi-doped borate glass. It was found that the NIR luminescence intensity generally decreases with the increase of heat-treatment temperature and experiences a dramatic decrement at around glass transition temperature. The possible mechanism is discussed, and can be attributed to the agglomeration of Bi active centers. We proposed a way of improving the thermal stability of NIR luminescence of borate glasses by regulating the structure rigidity of glass. We demonstrated a great improvement of the thermal stability of NIR luminescence by addition of La2O3. This is benefited from the large cationic field strength and high coordination number of La3+ ion which lead to the enhancement of the rigidity of glass structure. The results not only provide valuable guidance for suppressing performance degradation of Bi-doped glass during fiber drawing process, but also present an effective way to control the luminescence properties of main group elements in glasses from the perspective of glass structure.

Acknowledgment

This work was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants. 51132004, 51072054, and 51102209), National Basic Research Program of China (Grant 2011CB808100), Fundamental Research Funds for the Central University, and Guangdong Natural Science Funds for Distinguished Young Scholar (Grant S2013050014549). This work was also supported by the Open Fund of the State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices (South China University of Technology) and Nippon Sheet Glass Foundation for Materials Science and Engineering.

References and links

1.

E. M. Dianov, “Amplification in extended transmission bands using bismuth-doped optical fibers,” J. Lightwave Technol. 31(4), 681–688 (2013). [CrossRef]

2.

B. Zhou, L. Tao, Y. H. Tsang, W. Jin, and E. Y. Pun, “Superbroadband near-IR photoluminescence from Pr3+-doped fluorotellurite glasses,” Opt. Express 20(4), 3803–3813 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

I. A. Bufetov and E. M. Dianov, “Bi-doped fiber lasers,” Laser Phys. Lett. 6(7), 487–504 (2009). [CrossRef]

4.

B. Xu, S. Zhou, M. Guan, D. Tan, Y. Teng, J. Zhou, Z. Ma, Z. Hong, and J. Qiu, “Unusual luminescence quenching and reviving behavior of Bi-doped germanate glasses,” Opt. Express 19(23), 23436–23443 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

B. Zhou, H. Lin, B. Chen, and E. Y. Pun, “Superbroadband near-infrared emission in Tm-Bi codoped sodium-germanium-gallate glasses,” Opt. Express 19(7), 6514–6523 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

K. Zhang, S. Zhou, Y. Zhuang, R. Yang, and J. Qiu, “Bandwidth broadening of near-infrared emission through nanocrystallization in Bi/Ni co-doped glass,” Opt. Express 20(8), 8675–8680 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

Y. Fujimoto and M. Naskatsuka, “Infrared luminescence from Bismuth-doped silica glass,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 40(3), 279–281 (2001). [CrossRef]

8.

S. Zhou, G. Feng, J. Bao, H. Yang, and J. Qiu, “Broadband near-infrared emission from Bi-doped aluminosilicate glasses,” J. Mater. Res. 22(6), 1435–1438 (2007). [CrossRef]

9.

S. Zhou, W. Lei, J. Chen, J. Hao, H. Zeng, and J. Qiu, “Laser-induced optical property changes inside Bi-doped glass,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 21(6), 386–388 (2009). [CrossRef]

10.

B. Xu, P. Chen, S. Zhou, Z. Hong, J. Hao, and J. Qiu, “Enhanced broadband near-infrared luminescence in Bi-doped glasses by co-doped with Ag,” J. Appl. Phys. 113(18), 183506 (2013). [CrossRef]

11.

M. Peng, J. Qiu, D. Chen, X. Meng, I. Yang, X. Jiang, and C. Zhu, “Bismuth- and aluminum-codoped germanium oxide glasses for super-broadband optical amplification,” Opt. Lett. 29(17), 1998–2000 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

S. Zhou, H. Dong, H. Zeng, J. Hao, J. Chen, and J. Qiu, “Infrared luminescence and amplification properties of Bi-doped GeO2-Ga2O3-Al2O3 glasses,” J. Appl. Phys. 103(10), 103532 (2008). [CrossRef]

13.

A. A. Pynenkov, S. V. Firstov, A. A. Panov, E. G. Firstova, K. N. Nishchev, I. A. Bufetov, and E. M. Dianov, “IR luminescence in bismuth-doped germanate glasses and fibres,” Quantum Electron. 43(2), 174–176 (2013). [CrossRef]

14.

X. G. Meng, J. R. Qiu, M. Y. Peng, D. P. Chen, Q. Z. Zhao, X. W. Jiang, and C. S. Zhu, “Infrared broadband emission of bismuth-doped barium-aluminum-borate glasses,” Opt. Express 13(5), 1635–1642 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

15.

B. Denker, B. Galagan, V. Osiko, S. Sverchkov, and E. Dianov, “Luminescent properties of Bi-doped boro-alumino-phosphate glasses,” Appl. Phys. B. 87(1), 135–137 (2007). [CrossRef]

16.

M. A. Hughes, T. Akada, T. Suzuki, Y. Ohishi, and D. W. Hewak, “Ultrabroad emission from a bismuth doped chalcogenide glass,” Opt. Express 17(22), 19345–19355 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

17.

S. Zhou, H. Dong, H. Zeng, G. Feng, H. Yang, B. Zhu, and J. Qiu, “Broadband optical amplification in Bi-doped germanium silicate glass,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 91(6), 061919 (2007). [CrossRef]

18.

N. Zhang, J. Qiu, G. Dong, Z. Yang, Q. Zhang, and M. Peng, “Broadband tunable near-infrared emission of Bi-doped composite germanosilicate glasses,” J. Mater. Chem. 22(7), 3154–3159 (2012). [CrossRef]

19.

E. M. Dianov, V. V. Dvoyrin, V. M. Mashinsky, A. A. Umnikov, M. V. Yashkov, and A. N. Gur’yanov, “CW bismuth fibre laser,” Quantum Electron. 35(12), 1083–1084 (2005). [CrossRef]

20.

I. Razdobreev, L. Bigot, V. Pureur, A. Favre, G. Bouwmans, and M. Douay, “Efficient all-fiber bismuth-doped laser,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 90(3), 031103 (2007). [CrossRef]

21.

I. A. Bufetov, S. V. Firstov, V. F. Khopin, O. I. Medvedkov, A. N. Guryanov, and E. M. Dianov, “Bi-doped fiber lasers and amplifiers for a spectral region of 1300-1470 nm,” Opt. Lett. 33(19), 2227–2229 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

22.

V. G. Truong, L. Bigot, A. Lerouge, M. Douay, and I. Razdobreev, “Study of thermal stability and luminescence quenching properties of bismuth-doped silicate glasses for fiber laser application,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 92(4), 041908 (2008). [CrossRef]

23.

J. Ren, G. Dong, S. Xu, R. Bao, and J. Qiu, “Inhomogeneous broadening, luminescence origin and optical amplification in bismuth-doped glass,” J. Phys. Chem. A 112(14), 3036–3039 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

24.

S. Zhou, N. Jiang, B. Zhu, H. Yang, S. Ye, G. Lakshminarayana, J. Hao, and J. Qiu, “Multifunctional bismuth-doped nanoporous silica glass: from blue-green, orange, red, and white light sources to ultra-broadband infrared amplifiers,” Adv. Funct. Mater. 18(9), 1407–1413 (2008). [CrossRef]

25.

H. T. Sun, Y. Matsushita, Y. Sakka, N. Shirahata, M. Tanaka, Y. Katsuya, H. Gao, and K. Kobayashi, “Synchrotron X-ray, photoluminescence, and quantum chemistry studies of bismuth-embedded dehydrated zeolite Y,” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134(6), 2918–2921 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

26.

M. Peng, C. Zollfrank, and L. Wondraczek, “Origin of broad NIR photoluminescence in bismuthate glass and Bi-doped glasses at room temperature,” J. Phys. Condens. Matter 21(28), 285106 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

27.

S. Khonthon, S. Morimoto, Y. Arai, and Y. Ohishi, “Redox equilibrium and NIR luminescence of Bi2O3-containing glasses,” Opt. Mater. 31(8), 1262–1268 (2009). [CrossRef]

28.

E. I. Kamitsos and G. D. Chryssikos, “Borate glass structure by raman and infrared spectroscopies,” J. Mol. Struct. 247, 1–16 (1991). [CrossRef]

29.

M. Sharada and D. Suresh Babu, “Spectroscopic studies of tantalum doped borate glasses,” Phys. B 407(19), 3945–3955 (2012). [CrossRef]

30.

H. Fan, G. Gao, G. Wang, and L. Hu, “Infrared, Raman and XPS spectroscopic studies of Bi2O3-B2O3-GeO2 glasses,” Solid State Sci. 12(4), 541–545 (2010). [CrossRef]

31.

A. A. Osipov and L. M. Osipova, “Raman scattering study of barium borate glasses and melts,” J. Phys. Chem. Solids 74(7), 971–978 (2013). [CrossRef]

32.

M. Monika, M. Falconieri, S. Baccaro, G. Sharma, K. S. Thind, and D. P. Singh, “Role of aluminium oxide in the structure of heavy metal oxide borosilicate glasses,” Phys. Status Solidi A 209(8), 1438–1444 (2012). [CrossRef]

33.

M. M. Smedskjaer, J. C. Mauro, and Y. Yue, “Prediction of glass hardness using temperature-dependent constraint theory,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 105(11), 115503 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

34.

S. Zhou, W. Lei, N. Jiang, J. Hao, E. Wu, H. Zeng, and J. Qiu, “Space-selective control of luminescence inside the Bi-doped mesoporous silica glass by a femtosecond laser,” J. Mater. Chem. 19(26), 4603–4608 (2009). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(060.2280) Fiber optics and optical communications : Fiber design and fabrication
(160.2540) Materials : Fluorescent and luminescent materials
(160.4670) Materials : Optical materials
(160.4760) Materials : Optical properties

ToC Category:
Materials

History
Original Manuscript: July 29, 2013
Revised Manuscript: October 16, 2013
Manuscript Accepted: October 24, 2013
Published: November 6, 2013

Citation
Qiangbing Guo, Beibei Xu, Dezhi Tan, Juechen Wang, Shuhong Zheng, Wei Jiang, Jianrong Qiu, and Shifeng Zhou, "Regulation of structure rigidity for improvement of the thermal stability of near-infrared luminescence in Bi-doped borate glasses," Opt. Express 21, 27835-27840 (2013)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-21-23-27835


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. E. M. Dianov, “Amplification in extended transmission bands using bismuth-doped optical fibers,” J. Lightwave Technol.31(4), 681–688 (2013). [CrossRef]
  2. B. Zhou, L. Tao, Y. H. Tsang, W. Jin, and E. Y. Pun, “Superbroadband near-IR photoluminescence from Pr3+-doped fluorotellurite glasses,” Opt. Express20(4), 3803–3813 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. I. A. Bufetov and E. M. Dianov, “Bi-doped fiber lasers,” Laser Phys. Lett.6(7), 487–504 (2009). [CrossRef]
  4. B. Xu, S. Zhou, M. Guan, D. Tan, Y. Teng, J. Zhou, Z. Ma, Z. Hong, and J. Qiu, “Unusual luminescence quenching and reviving behavior of Bi-doped germanate glasses,” Opt. Express19(23), 23436–23443 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. B. Zhou, H. Lin, B. Chen, and E. Y. Pun, “Superbroadband near-infrared emission in Tm-Bi codoped sodium-germanium-gallate glasses,” Opt. Express19(7), 6514–6523 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. K. Zhang, S. Zhou, Y. Zhuang, R. Yang, and J. Qiu, “Bandwidth broadening of near-infrared emission through nanocrystallization in Bi/Ni co-doped glass,” Opt. Express20(8), 8675–8680 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. Y. Fujimoto and M. Naskatsuka, “Infrared luminescence from Bismuth-doped silica glass,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys.40(3), 279–281 (2001). [CrossRef]
  8. S. Zhou, G. Feng, J. Bao, H. Yang, and J. Qiu, “Broadband near-infrared emission from Bi-doped aluminosilicate glasses,” J. Mater. Res.22(6), 1435–1438 (2007). [CrossRef]
  9. S. Zhou, W. Lei, J. Chen, J. Hao, H. Zeng, and J. Qiu, “Laser-induced optical property changes inside Bi-doped glass,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett.21(6), 386–388 (2009). [CrossRef]
  10. B. Xu, P. Chen, S. Zhou, Z. Hong, J. Hao, and J. Qiu, “Enhanced broadband near-infrared luminescence in Bi-doped glasses by co-doped with Ag,” J. Appl. Phys.113(18), 183506 (2013). [CrossRef]
  11. M. Peng, J. Qiu, D. Chen, X. Meng, I. Yang, X. Jiang, and C. Zhu, “Bismuth- and aluminum-codoped germanium oxide glasses for super-broadband optical amplification,” Opt. Lett.29(17), 1998–2000 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  12. S. Zhou, H. Dong, H. Zeng, J. Hao, J. Chen, and J. Qiu, “Infrared luminescence and amplification properties of Bi-doped GeO2-Ga2O3-Al2O3 glasses,” J. Appl. Phys.103(10), 103532 (2008). [CrossRef]
  13. A. A. Pynenkov, S. V. Firstov, A. A. Panov, E. G. Firstova, K. N. Nishchev, I. A. Bufetov, and E. M. Dianov, “IR luminescence in bismuth-doped germanate glasses and fibres,” Quantum Electron.43(2), 174–176 (2013). [CrossRef]
  14. X. G. Meng, J. R. Qiu, M. Y. Peng, D. P. Chen, Q. Z. Zhao, X. W. Jiang, and C. S. Zhu, “Infrared broadband emission of bismuth-doped barium-aluminum-borate glasses,” Opt. Express13(5), 1635–1642 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  15. B. Denker, B. Galagan, V. Osiko, S. Sverchkov, and E. Dianov, “Luminescent properties of Bi-doped boro-alumino-phosphate glasses,” Appl. Phys. B.87(1), 135–137 (2007). [CrossRef]
  16. M. A. Hughes, T. Akada, T. Suzuki, Y. Ohishi, and D. W. Hewak, “Ultrabroad emission from a bismuth doped chalcogenide glass,” Opt. Express17(22), 19345–19355 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  17. S. Zhou, H. Dong, H. Zeng, G. Feng, H. Yang, B. Zhu, and J. Qiu, “Broadband optical amplification in Bi-doped germanium silicate glass,” Appl. Phys. Lett.91(6), 061919 (2007). [CrossRef]
  18. N. Zhang, J. Qiu, G. Dong, Z. Yang, Q. Zhang, and M. Peng, “Broadband tunable near-infrared emission of Bi-doped composite germanosilicate glasses,” J. Mater. Chem.22(7), 3154–3159 (2012). [CrossRef]
  19. E. M. Dianov, V. V. Dvoyrin, V. M. Mashinsky, A. A. Umnikov, M. V. Yashkov, and A. N. Gur’yanov, “CW bismuth fibre laser,” Quantum Electron.35(12), 1083–1084 (2005). [CrossRef]
  20. I. Razdobreev, L. Bigot, V. Pureur, A. Favre, G. Bouwmans, and M. Douay, “Efficient all-fiber bismuth-doped laser,” Appl. Phys. Lett.90(3), 031103 (2007). [CrossRef]
  21. I. A. Bufetov, S. V. Firstov, V. F. Khopin, O. I. Medvedkov, A. N. Guryanov, and E. M. Dianov, “Bi-doped fiber lasers and amplifiers for a spectral region of 1300-1470 nm,” Opt. Lett.33(19), 2227–2229 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  22. V. G. Truong, L. Bigot, A. Lerouge, M. Douay, and I. Razdobreev, “Study of thermal stability and luminescence quenching properties of bismuth-doped silicate glasses for fiber laser application,” Appl. Phys. Lett.92(4), 041908 (2008). [CrossRef]
  23. J. Ren, G. Dong, S. Xu, R. Bao, and J. Qiu, “Inhomogeneous broadening, luminescence origin and optical amplification in bismuth-doped glass,” J. Phys. Chem. A112(14), 3036–3039 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  24. S. Zhou, N. Jiang, B. Zhu, H. Yang, S. Ye, G. Lakshminarayana, J. Hao, and J. Qiu, “Multifunctional bismuth-doped nanoporous silica glass: from blue-green, orange, red, and white light sources to ultra-broadband infrared amplifiers,” Adv. Funct. Mater.18(9), 1407–1413 (2008). [CrossRef]
  25. H. T. Sun, Y. Matsushita, Y. Sakka, N. Shirahata, M. Tanaka, Y. Katsuya, H. Gao, and K. Kobayashi, “Synchrotron X-ray, photoluminescence, and quantum chemistry studies of bismuth-embedded dehydrated zeolite Y,” J. Am. Chem. Soc.134(6), 2918–2921 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  26. M. Peng, C. Zollfrank, and L. Wondraczek, “Origin of broad NIR photoluminescence in bismuthate glass and Bi-doped glasses at room temperature,” J. Phys. Condens. Matter21(28), 285106 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  27. S. Khonthon, S. Morimoto, Y. Arai, and Y. Ohishi, “Redox equilibrium and NIR luminescence of Bi2O3-containing glasses,” Opt. Mater.31(8), 1262–1268 (2009). [CrossRef]
  28. E. I. Kamitsos and G. D. Chryssikos, “Borate glass structure by raman and infrared spectroscopies,” J. Mol. Struct.247, 1–16 (1991). [CrossRef]
  29. M. Sharada and D. Suresh Babu, “Spectroscopic studies of tantalum doped borate glasses,” Phys. B407(19), 3945–3955 (2012). [CrossRef]
  30. H. Fan, G. Gao, G. Wang, and L. Hu, “Infrared, Raman and XPS spectroscopic studies of Bi2O3-B2O3-GeO2 glasses,” Solid State Sci.12(4), 541–545 (2010). [CrossRef]
  31. A. A. Osipov and L. M. Osipova, “Raman scattering study of barium borate glasses and melts,” J. Phys. Chem. Solids74(7), 971–978 (2013). [CrossRef]
  32. M. Monika, M. Falconieri, S. Baccaro, G. Sharma, K. S. Thind, and D. P. Singh, “Role of aluminium oxide in the structure of heavy metal oxide borosilicate glasses,” Phys. Status Solidi A209(8), 1438–1444 (2012). [CrossRef]
  33. M. M. Smedskjaer, J. C. Mauro, and Y. Yue, “Prediction of glass hardness using temperature-dependent constraint theory,” Phys. Rev. Lett.105(11), 115503 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  34. S. Zhou, W. Lei, N. Jiang, J. Hao, E. Wu, H. Zeng, and J. Qiu, “Space-selective control of luminescence inside the Bi-doped mesoporous silica glass by a femtosecond laser,” J. Mater. Chem.19(26), 4603–4608 (2009). [CrossRef]

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.

Figures

Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3
 

« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited