OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: Andrew M. Weiner
  • Vol. 21, Iss. 3 — Feb. 11, 2013
  • pp: 3067–3072
« Show journal navigation

Optical Cherenkov radiation in an As2S3 slot waveguide with four zero-dispersion wavelengths

Shaofei Wang, Jungao Hu, Hairun Guo, and Xianglong Zeng  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 21, Issue 3, pp. 3067-3072 (2013)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.21.003067


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (2309 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

We propose an approach for an efficient generation of optical Cherenkov radiation (OCR) in the near-infrared by tailoring the waveguide dispersion for a zero group-velocity mismatching between the radiation and the pump soliton. Based on an As2S3 slot waveguide with subwavelength dimensions, dispersion profiles with four zero dispersion wavelengths are found to produce a phase-matching nonlinear process leading to a broadband resonant radiation. The broadband OCR investigated in the chalcogenide waveguide may find applications in on-chip wavelength conversion and near-infrared pulse generation.

© 2013 OSA

1. Introduction

Optical Cherenkov radiation (OCR), also referred to as dispersive wave generation or non-solitonic radiation, originates from soliton propagation perturbed by high order dispersion (HOD). The OCR becomes of particular importance in the octave-spanning spectral broadening and blue-shifted supercontinuum generation (SCG) [1

1. J. Ranka, R. Windeler, and A. Stentz, “Visible continuum generation in air-silica microstructure optical fibers with anomalous dispersion at 800 nm,” Opt. Lett. 25, 25–27 (2000). [CrossRef]

4

4. J. M. Dudley, G. Genty, and S. Coen, “Supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fiber,” Rev. Mod. Phys. 78, 1135–1184 (2006). [CrossRef]

]. The radiation wavelengths are determined by a phase-matching (PM) condition, requiring an identical phase velocity for the soliton and the radiations. Up to now, considerable efforts have been devoted to investigating the OCRs with the advent of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) for their flexible dispersions and highly nonlinear properties [5

5. D. V. Skryabin, F. Luan, J. C. Knight, and P. St. J. Russell, “Soliton self-frequency shift cancellation in photonic crystal fibers,” Science 301, 1705–1708 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 6

6. H. Tu and S. A. Boppart, “Optical frequency up-conversion by supercontinuum-free widely-tunable fiber-optic Cherenkov radiation,” Opt. Express 17, 9858–9872 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Most OCRs have been widely explored based on the dispersion profiles with one or two zero-dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs), in which the resonant radiations usually fall into the normal group velocity dispersion (GVD) region.

Chromatic dispersion influences the OCR frequencies through the PM condition [7

7. N. Akhmediev and M. Karlsson, “Cherenkov radiation emitted by solitons in optical fibers,” Phys. Rev. A 51, 2602–2607 (1995). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 8

8. S. Roy, D. Ghosh, S. K. Bhadra, and G. P. Agrawal, “Role of dispersion profile in controlling emission of dispersive waves by solitons in supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Commun. 283, 3081–3088 (2010). [CrossRef]

]: βs(ωr) = β(ωr), where βs(ω) ≡ β(ωp) + β(1)(ωωp) + γ · P/2 reflects the nondispersive nature of a soliton, β(ωj) is the frequency dependent propagation constant and βn(ωj) is n-th order derivative of β at ωj, j = r or p represents the radiation or pump wave. P denotes the peak power of the input pump soliton and γ is the nonlinear waveguide coefficient. Typically, OCRs are located at some discrete frequencies owing to the fact that βs is a linear function of frequency (that is why soliton is non-dispersive).

In this paper, we investigate near-infrared OCRs in an As2S3 slot subwavelength waveguide by engineering its dispersion, and present a numerical analysis of a broadband radiation due to a zero group-velocity (GV) mismatch and broadband phase-matched nonlinear process. The mechanisms of narrow and broadband OCRs are studied in detail and excellent agreements between the PM predictions and numerical simulations are demonstrated. The proposed approach of minimizing the temporal walk-off between the pump soliton and the emitted radiation offers a general understanding of the OCR. Broadband OCR can serve as a new wavelength conversion scheme to achieve large conversion spanning. More important, it tends to a stable soliton state upon propagation, distinguished from linear radiations in the blue edge of the SCG. The broadband OCR may enhance the red edge of the SCG in the chalcogenide waveguide [9

9. M. R. E. Lamont, B. Luther-Davies, D. Choi, S. Madden, and B. J. Eggleton, “Supercontinuum generation in dispersion engineered highly nonlinear (γ = 10/W/m) As2S3 chalcogenide planar waveguide,” Opt. Express 16, 14938–14944 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

As2S3 material has a large Raman gain coefficient [10

10. C. Xiong, E. Magi, F. Luan, A. Tuniz, S. Dekker, J. S. Sanghera, L. B. Shaw, I. D. Aggarwal, and B. J. Eggleton, “Characterization of picosecond pulse nonlinear propagation in chalcogenide As2S3 fiber,” Appl. Opt. 48, 5467–5474 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], a large Kerr nonlinear index n2 = 3.0 × 10−18m2/W, a high refractive index (n ≈ 2.4) at the telecommunication wavelengths, and a low two photon absorption coefficient βTPA = 6.2 × 10−15m/W [11

11. J. T. Gopinath, M. Soljacic, E. P. Ippen, V. N. Fuflyigin, W. A. King, and M. Shurgalin, “Third order nonlinearities in Ge-As-Se-based glasses for telecommunications applications,” J. Appl. Phys. 96, 6931–6933 (2004). [CrossRef]

], which is three orders of magnitude lower than that of silicon [12

12. I. W. Hsieh, X. G. Chen, X. P. Liu, J. I. Dadap, N. C. Panoiu, C. Y. Chou, F. N. Xia, W. M. Green, Y. A. Vlasov, and R. M. Osgood, “Supercontinuum generation in silicon photonic wires,” Opt. Express 15, 15242–15249 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

2. Phase matching conditions of As2S3 slot waveguides

We use the recently proposed slot waveguide structure with subwavelength dimensions from Ref. [13

13. L. Zhang, Q. Lin, Y. Yue, Y. Yan, R. G. Beausoleil, and A. E. Willner, “Silicon waveguide with four zero-dispersion wavelengths and its application in on-chip octave-spanning supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Express 20, 1685–1690 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], shown in the inset of Fig. 1(a). The difference is that a silica slot is surrounded by two As2S3 layers, instead of silicon. As2S3 waveguides are in practice protected by using a coating layer of inorganic polymer glass (IPG) [9

9. M. R. E. Lamont, B. Luther-Davies, D. Choi, S. Madden, and B. J. Eggleton, “Supercontinuum generation in dispersion engineered highly nonlinear (γ = 10/W/m) As2S3 chalcogenide planar waveguide,” Opt. Express 16, 14938–14944 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] or GeSbS is used as the cladding material with a lower refractive index (n ≈ 2.3 at 1.55 μm). To be simple, we use the air outmost cladding to calculate the dispersion profiles. The substrate is a 4-μm-thick SiO2. Because of high refractive index contrast between As2S3 and silica (n ≈ 1.44 at 1.55 μm), the discontinuity of the electric field in the interface induces a high confinement factor in the nano-scale slot [14

14. V. R. Almeida, Q. F. Xu, C. A. Barrios, and M. Lipson, “Guiding and confining light in void nanostructure,” Opt. Lett. 29, 1209–1211 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. The field confinement in horizontal slot configuration is achieved for transverse-magnetic modes. On the other hand, the magnitude of waveguide dispersion of the slot waveguide can be as high as the material dispersion, thus total dispersion can be greatly tailored [15

15. S. Mas, J. Caraquitena, J. V. Galán, P. Sanchis, and J. Martí, “Tailoring the dispersion behavior of silicon nanophotonic slot waveguides,” Opt. Express 18, 20839–20844 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

Fig. 1 Chromatic dispersion tailored by using different heights of (a) lower-layer As2S3 (HS = 125 nm) and (b) silica slot (HL = 815 nm). The inset in (a) is the structural geometry of an As2S3 slot waveguide. (c) Effective mode area and nonlinear coefficient vs. wavelength, and the insert in (c) is mode field distributions.

The structural parameters of the slot waveguide are set as: upper As2S3 height HU = 395 nm, slot height HS = 125 nm, waveguide width HW = 1400 nm and lower As2S3 height HL = 815 nm. The effective refractive index (neff) is calculated by employing the radio frequency module of the commercial COMSOL software. The total dispersion is then calculated by taking the 2nd-order derivative of neff with respect to the wavelength (D = − (λ/c)d2neff/2), where c and λ are the speed of light and the vacuum wavelength, respectively. A dispersion profile with four ZDWs is obtained as plotted in Fig. 1(a), where a normal GVD range is surrounded by two anomalous GVD regions. Formation of such a saddle-shaped dispersion profile is mainly due to the mode transition and anti-crossing effect [13

13. L. Zhang, Q. Lin, Y. Yue, Y. Yan, R. G. Beausoleil, and A. E. Willner, “Silicon waveguide with four zero-dispersion wavelengths and its application in on-chip octave-spanning supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Express 20, 1685–1690 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] and the middle valley is lowered with a decreased HL. As shown in Fig. 1(b), increasing silica height leads to the mode transition at longer wavelengths and thus the third ZDW becomes longer. Compared to As2S3 rib waveguide with two ZDWs [9

9. M. R. E. Lamont, B. Luther-Davies, D. Choi, S. Madden, and B. J. Eggleton, “Supercontinuum generation in dispersion engineered highly nonlinear (γ = 10/W/m) As2S3 chalcogenide planar waveguide,” Opt. Express 16, 14938–14944 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], in which an anomalous GVD region is surrounded by two normal GVD regions, two anomalous GVD regions can be formed in the slot waveguide.

Note that it is important to consider the wavelength dependence of the nonlinear co-efficient on the waveguide mode in the simulation of a broadband spectral evolution. We calculate the effective mode area Aeff and the nonlinear coefficient γ by using [16

16. M. Zhu, H. J. Liu, X. F. Li, N. Huang, Q. B. Sun, J. Wen, and Z. L. Wang, “Ultrabroadband flat dispersion tailoring of dualslot silicon waveguides,” Opt. Express 20, 15899–15907 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 17

17. V. G. Ta’eed, N. J. Baker, L. Fu, K. Finsterbusch, M. R. E. Lamont, D. J. Moss, H. C. Nguyen, B. J. Eggleton, D. Y. Choi, S. Madden, and B. Luther-Davies, “Ultrafast all-optical chalcogenide glass photonic circuits,” Opt. Express 15, 9205–9221 (2007). [CrossRef]

]: Aeff = (∬|F(x,y)|2dxdy)2/∬|F(x,y)|4dxdy and γ=(2πλn¯2(x,y)|F(x,y)|4dxdy+iβTPA2)/(|F(x,y)|2dxdy)2, where F (x,y) is mode field distribution and 2 (x, y) means the nonlinear index distribution of the slot waveguide. Results shown in Fig. 1(c) indicate that the longer the wavelength, the larger the optical field area, and the smaller the induced nonlinear coefficients are.

The PM topologies are shown in Fig. 2 within a wide span of both the soliton wavelength and the resonant OCR wavelength. It is obvious that different dispersion profiles have different PM topologies, As shown in Fig. 2(a), besides two radiation bands in the blue and red sides (around 1.5 μm and 3.5 μm), additional OCR bands are predicted due to the existence of the middle two ZDWs. The two middle OCR bands become degenerate at a critical wavelength (CW), labeled as λ2 in Fig. 2(b), which is located in the anomalous GVD region. The OCR at the CW is always located in another anomalous GVD region, therefore propagating as a soliton state. This nonlinear process is known as soliton spectral tunneling effect [18

18. B. Kibler, P.-A. Lacourt, F. Courvoisier, and J. M. Dudley, “Soliton spectral tunnelling in photonic crystal fibre with sub-wavelength core defect,” Electron. Lett. 43, 967–968 (2007). [CrossRef]

, 19

19. S. Stark, F. Biancalana, A. Podlipensky, and P. St. J. Russell, “Nonlinear wavelength conversion in photonic crystal fibers with three zero-dispersion points,” Phys. Rev. A 83, 023808 (2011). [CrossRef]

]. When having a higher order soliton number, the corresponding PM topologies are shown in Fig. 2(b), in which the OCR band slightly increases while red-shifting the CW.

Fig. 2 (a) Phase-matching topologies (NS = 1) corresponding to four dispersion profiles plotted in Fig. 1(a). (b) PM topologies (HL =815 nm) with respect to the input NS (the gray areas are anomalous GVD regions, A and N represent anomalous and normal GVD, respectively). The input pulse is 50 fs (FWHM) with a hyperbolic secant shape.

3. Numerical results and discussion

We now study the behavior of ultrashort pulse propagation inside an As2S3 waveguide. A detailed analysis is provided, based on the numerical solution of the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation (GNLSE):
A(z,T)T+α2A(z,T)=1{[β(ω)β(ω0)β(1)(ω0)(ωω0)]A˜(z,ω)}+iγ(1+iω0T)A(z,T)×+R(TT)|A(z,T)|2dT
(1)
where the complex A(z,T) is a time-domain description of the propagating field envelope in a reference frame traveling with the input pulse. The second term represents the linear loss α, which is assumed to be negligible in the simulation because of low loss propagating in the As2S3[20

20. S. J. Madden, D. Y. Choi, D. A. Bulla, A. V. Rode, B. Luther-Davies, V. G. Ta’eed, M. D. Pelusi, and B. J. Eggleton, “Long, low loss etched As2S3 chalcogenide waveguides for all-optical signal regeneration,” Opt. Express 15, 14414–14421 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] and less power distribution in silica slot for shorter wavelengths than 3 μm. In the right-hand side, the term with a integral denotes the 3-order nonlinear wave interaction through the material Raman response, where R(t) = (1 − fR)δ(t) + fRhR(t) is the nonlinear response function of As2S3 waveguide and hR is taken as hR(t)=τ12+τ22τ1τ22exp(tτ2)sin(tτ1), where τ1 is 15.5 fs, τ2 is 230.5 fs and the Raman ratio fR is 0.1 [10

10. C. Xiong, E. Magi, F. Luan, A. Tuniz, S. Dekker, J. S. Sanghera, L. B. Shaw, I. D. Aggarwal, and B. J. Eggleton, “Characterization of picosecond pulse nonlinear propagation in chalcogenide As2S3 fiber,” Appl. Opt. 48, 5467–5474 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. All HOD terms and the wavelength dependent nonlinear coefficient are included in the simulations.

Figure 3(a, b) show the spectral and temporal evolution dynamics of the soliton in such an As2S3 slot waveguide with four ZDWs. The dispersion profile used in the simulation is the red line in Fig. 1(a) and its corresponding PM curve is the black line in Fig. 2(b). We launch a 50 fs pulse (FWHM: full width at half maximum) at the central wavelength of 1.8 μm into a 15-cm long As2S3 slot waveguide. Its soliton number NS = 2 requires the pump power of 12.80 W. The soliton fission occurs at the propagating distance (z = 2.5 cm), where a predicted narrow-band OCR is detached at the wavelength of 1.39 μm. The spectrum after the soliton fission is shown in Fig. 3(c). The narrow PM condition is shown in the red curve of Fig. 3(d) and large GV mismatch is seen in Fig. 3(e). The GV is defined as vg = 1/β(1) and the GV-mismatch parameter is d12 = 1/vg(ωp) − 1/vg(ωr). This narrow-band OCR quickly becomes separated and delayed from the main pulse. A streak in the temporal evolution is clearly shown in Fig. 3(b).

Fig. 3 (a) Spectral and (b) temporal dynamics of 50 fs input soliton (NS = 2) at the wavelength of 1.8 μm in As2S3 slot waveguide, A and N represent anomalous and normal GVD. (c) Spectrum at the soliton fission (red line) and the output (blue line). (d) PM ≡ βs(λp) − β(λ) curves at the different soliton wavelengths λp and (e) GV curve.

When the pump soliton approaches the CW (1.88 μm) due to the soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) induced by the Raman effect, the second phase-matched OCR band located at λ2 = 2.83 μm is observed with a broad bandwidth as shown in Fig. 3(c). It is found that the radiation has the same GV as the pump soliton at the CW in Fig. 3(e). Thus GV matching results in a broad conversion band at the wavelength of 2.83 μm. The third narrow OCR band located in 3.81 μm is too weak because it is far away from the pump soliton.

The mechanisms behind narrow and broadband OCRs are easily understood by recalling the broadband second harmonic generation (SHG) in χ(2) media [21

21. X. Zeng, S. Ashihara, X. Chen, T. Shimura, and K. Kuroda, “Two-color pulse compression in aperiodically poled lithium niobate,” Opt. Commun. 281, 4499–4503 (2008). [CrossRef]

, 22

22. N. E. Yu, J. H. Ro, M. Cha, S. Kurimura, and T. Taira, “Broadband quasi-phase-matched second-harmonic generation in MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 at the communications band,” Opt. Lett. 27, 1046–1048 (2002). [CrossRef]

]. The SHG bandwidth Δλ is determined by the width of sinc2βL/2) and the efficiency is proportional to the interaction length L, assuming an undepleted fundamental and neglecting temporal dispersion. Therefore we need to minimize the phase mismatch Δβ, i.e., ΔβΔβ(λ0)+(Δβ)λ(λλ0)+122(Δβ)λ2(λλ0)2, and (Δβ)λ=4πcλ2d12 indicates larger conversion bandwidths when GV matching between the radiation and the soliton. The OCR efficiency is determined by the spectral overlap between the pump soliton and the radiation. As shown in Fig. 4(a), the OCR efficiency is increased as HL increases, in which the wavelength span between the CW and its radiation decreases as seen in Fig. 2(a). More important, the broadband OCR tends to a stable soliton state in the anomalous GVD region upon propagation, as shown in Fig. 4(b).

Fig. 4 (a) Output spectra intensities under the different dispersion profiles (the inset is the OCR conversion efficiency vs. HL). (b) Pulse intensities of the OCR by filtering away the spectrum shorter than 2.25 μm (under the dispersion profiles HL = 815 nm).

The soliton evolution dynamics mentioned above are also confirmed by using the spectrogram in Fig. 5, in which the pulses are depicted simultaneously in the temporal and spectral domains. The spectrogram is calculated by S(λ,τ,z)=|+E(z,t)g(tτ)exp(i2πcλt)dt|2, where g(tτ) is the variable delay gate function with a delay value τ. With a propagation length z = 2.5 cm, an OCR band first appears in the short wavelength (around 1.39 μm), see Fig. 5(a). Upon further propagation, a tail-like shape in the spectrogram is formed due to large GV mismatch between the soliton and the first OCR. When the soliton pulse is red-shifted to approach the CW, the soliton spectrum becomes broadened over the normal GVD regime as shown in Fig. 5(b) and a broadband OCR at 2.83 μm is GV matching to the soliton pulse. Then this OCR grows up quickly, see Fig. 5(c). Afterwards, the second broadband OCR forms a soliton state as shown in Fig. 5(d).

Fig. 5 Pulse spectrograms at (a) 2.5-cm (b) 5-cm (c) 10-cm and (d) 15-cm distance.

4. Conclusion

We demonstrate an efficient broadband OCR in an As2S3 slot waveguide with four ZDWs. The presence of multiple ZDWs presents different PM topologies for the OCR. A broadband PM nonlinear process is found at the CW, where the soliton and the resonant radiation are GV matched. We make a detailed description of the OCR processes and numerical simulations clearly show the mechanisms of narrow and broadband OCRs by using the spectral evolution and the spectrogram. The broadband OCR investigated in the chalcogenide waveguide is expected to generate near-IR optical source as a new wavelength conversion scheme.

Acknowledgments

We acknowledge the support of the financial support from National Natural Science Foundation of China ( 11274224, 60978004, 60937003) and Shanghai Shuguang Program ( 10SG38) and Xianglong Zeng acknowledges the support of Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowship from EU (grant No. PIIF-GA-2009–253289).

References and links

1.

J. Ranka, R. Windeler, and A. Stentz, “Visible continuum generation in air-silica microstructure optical fibers with anomalous dispersion at 800 nm,” Opt. Lett. 25, 25–27 (2000). [CrossRef]

2.

I. Cristiani, R. Tediosi, L. Tartara, and V. Degiorgio, “Dispersive wave generation by solitons in microstructured optical fibers,” Opt. Express 12, 124–135 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

D. R. Austin, C. M. de Sterke, B. J. Eggleton, and T. G. Brown, “Dispersive wave blue-shift in supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Express 14, 11997–12007 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

J. M. Dudley, G. Genty, and S. Coen, “Supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fiber,” Rev. Mod. Phys. 78, 1135–1184 (2006). [CrossRef]

5.

D. V. Skryabin, F. Luan, J. C. Knight, and P. St. J. Russell, “Soliton self-frequency shift cancellation in photonic crystal fibers,” Science 301, 1705–1708 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

H. Tu and S. A. Boppart, “Optical frequency up-conversion by supercontinuum-free widely-tunable fiber-optic Cherenkov radiation,” Opt. Express 17, 9858–9872 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

N. Akhmediev and M. Karlsson, “Cherenkov radiation emitted by solitons in optical fibers,” Phys. Rev. A 51, 2602–2607 (1995). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

S. Roy, D. Ghosh, S. K. Bhadra, and G. P. Agrawal, “Role of dispersion profile in controlling emission of dispersive waves by solitons in supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Commun. 283, 3081–3088 (2010). [CrossRef]

9.

M. R. E. Lamont, B. Luther-Davies, D. Choi, S. Madden, and B. J. Eggleton, “Supercontinuum generation in dispersion engineered highly nonlinear (γ = 10/W/m) As2S3 chalcogenide planar waveguide,” Opt. Express 16, 14938–14944 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

10.

C. Xiong, E. Magi, F. Luan, A. Tuniz, S. Dekker, J. S. Sanghera, L. B. Shaw, I. D. Aggarwal, and B. J. Eggleton, “Characterization of picosecond pulse nonlinear propagation in chalcogenide As2S3 fiber,” Appl. Opt. 48, 5467–5474 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

J. T. Gopinath, M. Soljacic, E. P. Ippen, V. N. Fuflyigin, W. A. King, and M. Shurgalin, “Third order nonlinearities in Ge-As-Se-based glasses for telecommunications applications,” J. Appl. Phys. 96, 6931–6933 (2004). [CrossRef]

12.

I. W. Hsieh, X. G. Chen, X. P. Liu, J. I. Dadap, N. C. Panoiu, C. Y. Chou, F. N. Xia, W. M. Green, Y. A. Vlasov, and R. M. Osgood, “Supercontinuum generation in silicon photonic wires,” Opt. Express 15, 15242–15249 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

L. Zhang, Q. Lin, Y. Yue, Y. Yan, R. G. Beausoleil, and A. E. Willner, “Silicon waveguide with four zero-dispersion wavelengths and its application in on-chip octave-spanning supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Express 20, 1685–1690 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

V. R. Almeida, Q. F. Xu, C. A. Barrios, and M. Lipson, “Guiding and confining light in void nanostructure,” Opt. Lett. 29, 1209–1211 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

15.

S. Mas, J. Caraquitena, J. V. Galán, P. Sanchis, and J. Martí, “Tailoring the dispersion behavior of silicon nanophotonic slot waveguides,” Opt. Express 18, 20839–20844 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

M. Zhu, H. J. Liu, X. F. Li, N. Huang, Q. B. Sun, J. Wen, and Z. L. Wang, “Ultrabroadband flat dispersion tailoring of dualslot silicon waveguides,” Opt. Express 20, 15899–15907 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

17.

V. G. Ta’eed, N. J. Baker, L. Fu, K. Finsterbusch, M. R. E. Lamont, D. J. Moss, H. C. Nguyen, B. J. Eggleton, D. Y. Choi, S. Madden, and B. Luther-Davies, “Ultrafast all-optical chalcogenide glass photonic circuits,” Opt. Express 15, 9205–9221 (2007). [CrossRef]

18.

B. Kibler, P.-A. Lacourt, F. Courvoisier, and J. M. Dudley, “Soliton spectral tunnelling in photonic crystal fibre with sub-wavelength core defect,” Electron. Lett. 43, 967–968 (2007). [CrossRef]

19.

S. Stark, F. Biancalana, A. Podlipensky, and P. St. J. Russell, “Nonlinear wavelength conversion in photonic crystal fibers with three zero-dispersion points,” Phys. Rev. A 83, 023808 (2011). [CrossRef]

20.

S. J. Madden, D. Y. Choi, D. A. Bulla, A. V. Rode, B. Luther-Davies, V. G. Ta’eed, M. D. Pelusi, and B. J. Eggleton, “Long, low loss etched As2S3 chalcogenide waveguides for all-optical signal regeneration,” Opt. Express 15, 14414–14421 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

21.

X. Zeng, S. Ashihara, X. Chen, T. Shimura, and K. Kuroda, “Two-color pulse compression in aperiodically poled lithium niobate,” Opt. Commun. 281, 4499–4503 (2008). [CrossRef]

22.

N. E. Yu, J. H. Ro, M. Cha, S. Kurimura, and T. Taira, “Broadband quasi-phase-matched second-harmonic generation in MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 at the communications band,” Opt. Lett. 27, 1046–1048 (2002). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(190.5530) Nonlinear optics : Pulse propagation and temporal solitons
(190.7110) Nonlinear optics : Ultrafast nonlinear optics

ToC Category:
Nonlinear Optics

History
Original Manuscript: December 12, 2012
Revised Manuscript: January 23, 2013
Manuscript Accepted: January 23, 2013
Published: January 31, 2013

Citation
Shaofei Wang, Jungao Hu, Hairun Guo, and Xianglong Zeng, "Optical Cherenkov radiation in an As2S3 slot waveguide with four zero-dispersion wavelengths," Opt. Express 21, 3067-3072 (2013)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-21-3-3067


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. J. Ranka, R. Windeler, and A. Stentz, “Visible continuum generation in air-silica microstructure optical fibers with anomalous dispersion at 800 nm,” Opt. Lett.25, 25–27 (2000). [CrossRef]
  2. I. Cristiani, R. Tediosi, L. Tartara, and V. Degiorgio, “Dispersive wave generation by solitons in microstructured optical fibers,” Opt. Express12, 124–135 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. D. R. Austin, C. M. de Sterke, B. J. Eggleton, and T. G. Brown, “Dispersive wave blue-shift in supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Express14, 11997–12007 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. J. M. Dudley, G. Genty, and S. Coen, “Supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fiber,” Rev. Mod. Phys.78, 1135–1184 (2006). [CrossRef]
  5. D. V. Skryabin, F. Luan, J. C. Knight, and P. St. J. Russell, “Soliton self-frequency shift cancellation in photonic crystal fibers,” Science301, 1705–1708 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. H. Tu and S. A. Boppart, “Optical frequency up-conversion by supercontinuum-free widely-tunable fiber-optic Cherenkov radiation,” Opt. Express17, 9858–9872 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. N. Akhmediev and M. Karlsson, “Cherenkov radiation emitted by solitons in optical fibers,” Phys. Rev. A51, 2602–2607 (1995). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  8. S. Roy, D. Ghosh, S. K. Bhadra, and G. P. Agrawal, “Role of dispersion profile in controlling emission of dispersive waves by solitons in supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Commun.283, 3081–3088 (2010). [CrossRef]
  9. M. R. E. Lamont, B. Luther-Davies, D. Choi, S. Madden, and B. J. Eggleton, “Supercontinuum generation in dispersion engineered highly nonlinear (γ = 10/W/m) As2S3 chalcogenide planar waveguide,” Opt. Express16, 14938–14944 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  10. C. Xiong, E. Magi, F. Luan, A. Tuniz, S. Dekker, J. S. Sanghera, L. B. Shaw, I. D. Aggarwal, and B. J. Eggleton, “Characterization of picosecond pulse nonlinear propagation in chalcogenide As2S3 fiber,” Appl. Opt.48, 5467–5474 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. J. T. Gopinath, M. Soljacic, E. P. Ippen, V. N. Fuflyigin, W. A. King, and M. Shurgalin, “Third order nonlinearities in Ge-As-Se-based glasses for telecommunications applications,” J. Appl. Phys.96, 6931–6933 (2004). [CrossRef]
  12. I. W. Hsieh, X. G. Chen, X. P. Liu, J. I. Dadap, N. C. Panoiu, C. Y. Chou, F. N. Xia, W. M. Green, Y. A. Vlasov, and R. M. Osgood, “Supercontinuum generation in silicon photonic wires,” Opt. Express15, 15242–15249 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. L. Zhang, Q. Lin, Y. Yue, Y. Yan, R. G. Beausoleil, and A. E. Willner, “Silicon waveguide with four zero-dispersion wavelengths and its application in on-chip octave-spanning supercontinuum generation,” Opt. Express20, 1685–1690 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  14. V. R. Almeida, Q. F. Xu, C. A. Barrios, and M. Lipson, “Guiding and confining light in void nanostructure,” Opt. Lett.29, 1209–1211 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  15. S. Mas, J. Caraquitena, J. V. Galán, P. Sanchis, and J. Martí, “Tailoring the dispersion behavior of silicon nanophotonic slot waveguides,” Opt. Express18, 20839–20844 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  16. M. Zhu, H. J. Liu, X. F. Li, N. Huang, Q. B. Sun, J. Wen, and Z. L. Wang, “Ultrabroadband flat dispersion tailoring of dualslot silicon waveguides,” Opt. Express20, 15899–15907 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  17. V. G. Ta’eed, N. J. Baker, L. Fu, K. Finsterbusch, M. R. E. Lamont, D. J. Moss, H. C. Nguyen, B. J. Eggleton, D. Y. Choi, S. Madden, and B. Luther-Davies, “Ultrafast all-optical chalcogenide glass photonic circuits,” Opt. Express15, 9205–9221 (2007). [CrossRef]
  18. B. Kibler, P.-A. Lacourt, F. Courvoisier, and J. M. Dudley, “Soliton spectral tunnelling in photonic crystal fibre with sub-wavelength core defect,” Electron. Lett.43, 967–968 (2007). [CrossRef]
  19. S. Stark, F. Biancalana, A. Podlipensky, and P. St. J. Russell, “Nonlinear wavelength conversion in photonic crystal fibers with three zero-dispersion points,” Phys. Rev. A83, 023808 (2011). [CrossRef]
  20. S. J. Madden, D. Y. Choi, D. A. Bulla, A. V. Rode, B. Luther-Davies, V. G. Ta’eed, M. D. Pelusi, and B. J. Eggleton, “Long, low loss etched As2S3 chalcogenide waveguides for all-optical signal regeneration,” Opt. Express15, 14414–14421 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  21. X. Zeng, S. Ashihara, X. Chen, T. Shimura, and K. Kuroda, “Two-color pulse compression in aperiodically poled lithium niobate,” Opt. Commun.281, 4499–4503 (2008). [CrossRef]
  22. N. E. Yu, J. H. Ro, M. Cha, S. Kurimura, and T. Taira, “Broadband quasi-phase-matched second-harmonic generation in MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 at the communications band,” Opt. Lett.27, 1046–1048 (2002). [CrossRef]

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.

Figures

Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3
 
Fig. 4 Fig. 5
 

« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited