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Optics Express

  • Editor: Andrew M. Weiner
  • Vol. 21, Iss. 5 — Mar. 11, 2013
  • pp: 5338–5345
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Femtosecond fiber CPA system based on picosecond master oscillator and power amplifier with CCC fiber

J. Želudevičius, R. Danilevičius, K. Viskontas, N. Rusteika, and K. Regelskis  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 21, Issue 5, pp. 5338-5345 (2013)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.21.005338


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Abstract

Results of numerical and experimental investigations of the simple fiber CPA system seeded by nearly bandwidth-limited pulses from the picosecond oscillator are presented. We utilized self-phase modulation in a stretcher fiber to broaden the pulse spectrum and dispersion of the fiber to stretch pulses in time. During amplification in the ytterbium-doped CCC fiber, gain-shaping and self-phase modulation effects were observed, which improved pulse compression with a bulk diffraction grating compressor. After compression with spectral filtering, pulses with the duration of 400 fs and energy as high as 50 µJ were achieved, and the output beam quality was nearly diffraction-limited.

© 2013 OSA

1. Introduction

Fiber lasers and amplifiers are capable of providing high average power output and diffraction limited beam quality thanks to intrinsic fiber geometry and confined propagation of radiation. High efficiency, compactness and robustness of such laser systems make them attractive for a variety of applications in an industrial environment. Despite prominent achievements in high average power (kilowatts of average power in CW regime) [1

1. Y.-C. Jeong, A. J. Boyland, J. K. Sahu, S.-H. Chung, J. Nilsson, and D. N. Payne, “Multi-kilowatt single-mode ytterbium-doped large-core fiber laser,” J. Opt. Soc. Korea 13(4), 416–422 (2009). [CrossRef]

], the highest pulse peak power is usually limited by nonlinear interactions in fiber, caused by high irradiances in the core and large interaction length. Thus the design of fiber laser systems generating ultra-short pulses with considerable energies is still a challenge.

In order to overcome the peak-power limitation, two main strategies are implemented: increasing of the diameter of the fiber core and stretching the pulse in time before amplification followed by recompression after the amplification – chirped pulse amplification (CPA) [2

2. D. Strickland and G. Mourou, “Compression of amplified chirped optical pulses,” Opt. Commun. 56(3), 219–221 (1985). [CrossRef]

]. Increasing the fiber core together with maintaining single-mode (or a few-mode) operation requires making the fiber weakly guiding, thus, in the case of large-mode-area fibers, the core diameter is usually limited to 30 µm. Further increase of the fiber core is possible in a rod-type photonic crystal fiber – the rigid structure, which sacrifices the initial fiber laser properties of compactness, and simple thermal management. Promising results were demonstrated by large-core fibers with higher order mode discrimination, either rod-type [3

3. T. T. Alkeskjold, M. Laurila, L. Scolari, and J. Broeng, “Single-mode ytterbium-doped large-mode-area photonic bandgap rod fiber amplifier,” Opt. Express 19(8), 7398–7409 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] or conventional (flexible) type [4

4. J. Li, X. Peng, and L. Dong, “Robust fundamental mode operation in a ytterbium-doped leakage channel fiber with an effective area of ~3000µm2,” in Advanced Solid-State Photonics, OSA Technical Digest Series (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2007), paper ME3.

,5

5. C.-H. Liu, G. Chang, N. Litchinister, D. Guertin, N. Jacobson, K. Tankala, and A. Galvanauskas, “Chirally coupled core fibers at 1550-nm and 1064-nm for effectively single-mode core size scaling,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, OSA Technical Digest Series (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2007), paper CTuBB3.

]. In the latter case, by using the chirally-coupled core (CCC) design, not only single-mode operation is achieved, but also polarization state is shown to be maintained [5

5. C.-H. Liu, G. Chang, N. Litchinister, D. Guertin, N. Jacobson, K. Tankala, and A. Galvanauskas, “Chirally coupled core fibers at 1550-nm and 1064-nm for effectively single-mode core size scaling,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, OSA Technical Digest Series (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2007), paper CTuBB3.

].

For the high-energy ultra-short pulse laser system, along with the large-mode-area (LMA) fiber, CPA is required. In the conventional CPA system, the dispersion between the stretcher and compressor is matched up to the third order and efforts are made to minimize the accumulated nonlinear phase shift [6

6. M. D. Perry, T. Ditmire, and B. C. Stuart, “Self-phase modulation in chirped-pulse amplification,” Opt. Lett. 19(24), 2149–2151 (1994). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. However, it was recently shown that a fiber CPA (FCPA) can operate at high levels of the nonlinear phase shift and still provide high-peak power (quality) pulses [7

7. S. Zhou, L. Kuznetsova, A. Chong, and F. Wise, “Compensation of nonlinear phase shifts with third-order dispersion in short-pulse fiber amplifiers,” Opt. Express 13(13), 4869–4877 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,8

8. L. Kuznetsova and F. W. Wise, “Scaling of femtosecond Yb-doped fiber amplifiers to tens of microjoule pulse energy via nonlinear chirped pulse amplification,” Opt. Lett. 32(18), 2671–2673 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Moreover, when using a fiber as a stretcher and a bulk grating compressor, it is possible to compensate the third-order dispersion (TOD) mismatch between the stretcher and compressor by exploiting the self-phase modulation (SPM) of asymmetrical “cubicon” pulses [9

9. L. Shah, Z. Liu, I. Hartl, G. Imeshev, G. Cho, and M. Fermann, “High energy femtosecond Yb cubicon fiber amplifier,” Opt. Express 13(12), 4717–4722 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

In this work, we go further in utilizing nonlinearity in FCPA. We demonstrate a femtosecond fiber laser system with 50 µJ pulse energy based on the CPA design and seeded by nearly bandwidth-limited picosecond pulses. In order to achieve femtosecond pulses, we utilized SPM to broaden the spectrum and dispersion of the fiber to stretch pulses up to 450 ps. In the final amplification stage, an ytterbium-doped double-clad CCC fiber was used. After the amplification, pulses were compressed to 400 fs duration using a bulk diffraction grating compressor. Despite the fact that better FCPA achievements regarding pulse duration [10

10. D. Mortag, T. Theeg, K. Hausmann, L. Grüner-Nielsen, K. G. Jespersen, U. Morgner, D. Wandt, D. Kracht, and J. Neumann, “Sub-200 fs microjoule pulses from a monolithic linear fiber CPA system,” Opt. Commun. 285(5), 706–709 (2012). [CrossRef]

] and energy [11

11. T. Eidam, J. Rothhardt, F. Stutzki, F. Jansen, S. Hädrich, H. Carstens, C. Jauregui, J. Limpert, and A. Tünnermann, “Fiber chirped-pulse amplification system emitting 3.8 GW peak power,” Opt. Express 19(1), 255–260 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] have already been demonstrated, our approach can benefit from a very simple design. The presented laser system is polarization maintaining, it can be easily designed in all-fiber manner (excluding the grating compressor) by implementing standard splicing techniques, and should be cost-effective because of the simple master oscillator.

2. Experimental setup and theoretical framework

The seed source of the FCPA system was a passively mode-locked all-in-fiber picosecond oscillator working at a 1064.7 nm center wavelength (see Fig. 1
Fig. 1 Principle scheme of the all-in-fiber passively mode-locked oscillator: CFBG – chirped fiber Bragg grating, WDM – wavelength division multiplexer, SAM – saturable absorber mirror.
). The chosen operation wavelength does not match the spectral gain maximum of the ytterbium-doped fiber (which is around 1030 nm [12

12. R. Paschotta, J. Nilsson, A. C. Tropper, and D. C. Hanna, “Ytterbium-doped fiber amplifiers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 33(7), 1049–1056 (1997). [CrossRef]

]). However, taking into account spectral gain characteristics and SPM effects, a longer wavelength of the seed is more suitable for amplification of broadband chirped pulses [13

13. D. N. Schimpf, J. Limpert, and A. Tünnermann, “Optimization of high performance ultrafast fiber laser systems to >10 GW peak power,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27(10), 2051–2060 (2010). [CrossRef]

]. Chirped fiber Bragg grating (CFBG) (70% reflectivity at a 1064 nm wavelength, 2.5 nm spectral bandwidth, 4.04 ps/nm dispersion) was used for pulse spectrum formation in order to achieve picosecond pulse duration. For a stable passive mode-locking, a saturable absorber mirror (SAM) was implemented as the end mirror of the resonator. We used an ytterbium-doped polarization-maintaining (PM) single-mode (SM) fiber as an active medium. This fiber was pumped with a 976 nm laser diode (LD pump) through a wavelength division multiplexer (WDM). The optimal pump power for a stable single-pulse regime and maximum output power was 65 mW. One output end of a 70/30 beam splitter was used for synchronization purposes, the other – as the oscillator output. The splitter, with the specified polarization extinction ratio (PER) of >20 dB, also provided the single polarization state selection function in the resonator. The oscillator generated nearly bandwidth-limited pulses with the duration of 3.2 ps at the 52 MHz repetition frequency with the average power of 4 mW.

The whole FCPA setup is depicted in Fig. 2
Fig. 2 Experimental FCPA setup. The main structural parts are: oscillator, pre-amplifier 1, AOM – acousto-optic modulator, stretcher, pre-amplifier 2, power amplifier, and compressor.
. Beside the oscillator it consisted of the first pre-amplifier, an acousto-optic down-counter, a PM SM fiber stretcher, the second preamplifier, a power amplifier and a bulk grating compressor. All fibers were polarization maintaining – PANDA type, excluding the CCC fiber, which maintained light polarization state as well, but had a different internal structure – a large central core and a satellite core wrapped around the central core [5

5. C.-H. Liu, G. Chang, N. Litchinister, D. Guertin, N. Jacobson, K. Tankala, and A. Galvanauskas, “Chirally coupled core fibers at 1550-nm and 1064-nm for effectively single-mode core size scaling,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, OSA Technical Digest Series (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2007), paper CTuBB3.

].

Laser pulses from the oscillator were amplified in the first pre-amplifier, which was based on the ytterbium-doped core-pumped PM SM active fiber (PM SM-Yb). In this amplification stage, the pulse energy was increased to the value needed to achieve the required spectrum broadening because of SPM in the stretching fiber. Before the fiber stretcher, an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) was used to decrease the pulse repetition rate down to 100 kHz. In order to increase pulse energy up to the level required for seeding the CCC power amplifier with gain of ~30 dB, chirped pulses were amplified in the second pre-amplifier after the stretcher. The design of the second pre-amplifier was analogous to that of the first pre-amplifier.

Before launching the chirped pulses into the power amplifier, the accumulated amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) was removed with a long-pass optical filter. For the power amplifier, a 2 m-long ytterbium-doped double-clad CCC fiber with the diameter of the central core of 33 µm (MFD ~27 µm) was used. The main advantage of the CCC fiber over conventional LMA fibers is strictly single fundamental mode guiding [5

5. C.-H. Liu, G. Chang, N. Litchinister, D. Guertin, N. Jacobson, K. Tankala, and A. Galvanauskas, “Chirally coupled core fibers at 1550-nm and 1064-nm for effectively single-mode core size scaling,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, OSA Technical Digest Series (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2007), paper CTuBB3.

]. This is very important in the amplification of broad-spectrum chirped pulses, because even a low content of higher-order modes leads to mode-beating and spectral modulation, which eventually can appear as pedestal or satellite pulses after recompression. Another important requirement for the FCPA design, operating with high nonlinearity, is to maintain the smooth temporal and spectral shape of the amplified stretched pulses, because irregularities tend to be amplified in the presence of SPM and can as well produce satellite pulses after recompression [14

14. D. Schimpf, E. Seise, J. Limpert, and A. Tünnermann, “Decrease of pulse-contrast in nonlinear chirped-pulse amplification systems due to high-frequency spectral phase ripples,” Opt. Express 16(12), 8876–8886 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. A CCC active fiber was pumped in the counter-propagating direction using a high-power laser diode module.

The amplified pulses were compressed using a compressor with the 1000 1/mm groove density high-efficiency (diffraction efficiency >94%) transmission gratings. Optimal compression of the pulses required compensation of the second-order dispersion of −24 ps2, which corresponded to the large grating separation of more than 3.6 m. Estimated TOD induced by the compressor was 0.14 ps3. A smaller compressor can be designed using higher groove-density gratings, however, with increasing the groove density, an uncompensated TOD of the compressor increases and this reduces the quality of compressed pulses. For practical applications, the grating compressor can be folded to make a more compact system.

3. Results and discussion

The experimental pulse autocorrelation and spectrum traces of the oscillator generated pulses compared with theoretical modeling curves are presented in Figs. 3(a)
Fig. 3 (a) Autocorrelation function of the oscillator pulses (red circles – experimental data; solid black – numerical calculations). (b) Spectrum of the oscillator pulses (solid red – experimental data; solid black – numerical calculations).
and 3(b). Good agreement between experimental and numerical data is evident in the presented Figs. The pulse spectrum was 0.5 nm wide (FWHM) and had two low-intensity sidebands (see Fig. 3(b)). These sidebands arise from constructive mixing between soliton pulse and dispersive radiation that is generated from perturbated soliton [18

18. D. U. Noske, N. Pandit, and J. R. Taylor, “Source of spectral and temporal instability in soliton fiber lasers,” Opt. Lett. 17(21), 1515–1517 (1992). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Such spectral sidebands are characteristic for the soliton mode-locked fiber oscillators.

After amplification in the first pre-amplifier and reduction of pulse repetition rate down to 100 kHz, oscillator pulses were stretched both in the frequency and time domain. At the beginning of fiber stretcher the pulse peak power was initially high (pulse energy was ~1.6 nJ), SPM dominated over dispersion and the pulse spectrum was broadened. A broader spectrum was required in order to achieve femtosecond pulses after compression. As a broad-spectrum pulse propagated further in the fiber, GVD stretched the pulse in time. Due to the combined effects of SPM and GVD, strongly chirped triangular-shaped pulses with a 450 ps duration (FWHM) (see Fig. 4(a)
Fig. 4 (a) Temporal profile of the stretched pulses (solid red – experimental data; solid black – numerical calculations) and chirp profile of numerically calculated pulses (dashed black). (b) Spectrum of the stretched pulses (with inclusion of residual low-energy pulses) (solid red – experimental data; solid black – numerical calculations) and calculated spectral group delay curve after linear part (caused by GVD) is numerically compensated (dashed black).
, red trace) and 6 nm-broad (FWHM) spectrum (see Fig. 4(b), red trace) were achieved after the 1 km-long PM SM fiber stretcher. The temporal shape of pulses was measured using a fast photodiode (8 ps pulse response) and a real-time oscilloscope (18 GHz bandwidth). Deviation of the spectrum in Fig. 4(b) from the perfect triangular shape at the center of the spectrum was caused by the residual of the high-repetition-rate low-energy pulses, which were highly attenuated by AOM (~40 dB) but, being more numerous (52 MHz versus 100 kHz), still represented 9% of the total average power. This claim was supported by modeling results because a very similar spectrum to experimental was achieved only when spectra of the main pulses and the residual low energy pulses were combined (see Fig. 4(b), black trace). The black trace in Fig. 4(a) represents the numerically calculated pulse temporal profile after the stretcher fiber. The GVD of the stretcher fiber was not known precisely, therefore a typical value from literature was chosen [16

16. G. Agrawal, Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 3rd ed. (Academic, 2001).

] and fine-tuned for the best fit with the experimental data (used values: GVD = 2.3·10−2 ps2/m, TOD = 4.6·10−5 ps3/m). It can be seen from the numerical results that the chirp of the stretched pulses was mainly linear (see Fig. 4(a), dashed trace). In order to visualize chirp nonlinearities, we calculated the spectral group delay curve, after the linear part (caused by GVD) is numerically compensated (see Fig. 4(b), dashed curve). The shape of the presented group delay curve indicates that the nonlinear chirp was caused by the positive TOD (indicated by the dominant parabolic shape) in the fiber and SPM, and cannot be compensated using a diffraction grating compressor, which induces TOD of the same sign. However, amplification of pulses in the fiber amplifier in the presence of SPM induced cubic spectral phase, which changed the situation as it will be shown further.

After compression, the pulses with the duration of ~400 fs (FWHM, assuming a calculated deconvolution factor of 0.705) were experimentally achieved, which is 8 times shorter than the duration of the oscillator initial pulses. However, the pulse contrast was moderate with some of the energy in the picosecond-duration pedestal. As it was indicated by numerical modeling, this pedestal was removed by blocking in the compressor of the long-wavelength part of the pulse spectrum (spectral filtering) which contained the highest irregularities. Experimental investigation of the pulse compression when the opposite part of the spectrum (short-wavelength) was blocked and compressor length was re-optimized also showed some pulse contrast improvement in comparison to the case when the spectrum is not filtered. However, the results showed worse pulse contrast with more energy in pulse pedestal than in the case of spectral filtering of the long-wavelength part. The experimental spectrum of optimally compressed pulses with spectral filtering of the long-wavelength part of the pulse spectrum is shown as the orange trace in Fig. 6(b) inset. The pulse contrast was improved significantly by spectral filtering at the expense of increased losses of initial amplifier output. Efficiency of the compressor was 84% and after spectral filtering it reduced to 50%. Experimental and numerical autocorrelations of compressed pulses with spectral filtering were in good agreement as it is shown in Fig. 6(b). After compression with spectral filtering, 50 µJ energy pulses (5W of average power at 100 kHz) were experimentally achieved.

In order to characterize the beam quality after pulse compression, we measured the beam radius versus the distance from the beam waist. At the highest achievable pulse energy, the beam quality worsened slightly compared to the low-energy regime (compare Fig. 7(b)
Fig. 7 1/e2 beam radius of the compressor output beam versus distance from the waist location. Measured at the low output pulse energy (a) and at the high output pulse energy (50 µJ) (b). Inset – typical beam profile.
with Fig. 7(a)), but still was nearly diffraction-limited with M2 = 1.1.

Conclusion

We presented both numerical and experimental results of the simple FCPA system seeded by nearly bandwidth-limited pulses from the picosecond oscillator. The oscillator’s pulses were stretched up to the duration of 450 ps in a conventional PM single-mode fiber in the presence of SPM and dispersion. After amplification in the single-mode amplifiers and the CCC power amplifier, the pulses were compressed using a bulk grating compressor. During the amplification in the CCC power amplifier, the pulses were modified by gain-shaping in an ytterbium-doped amplifier and because of SPM acquired cubic spectral phase, which compensated TOD mismatch between stretcher and compressor at the short-wavelength part of the spectrum (trailing part of pulses in the time domain). This improved pulse compression after the long-wavelength part of the spectrum was filtered out in the compressor. As a result, pulses with the 400 fs duration and 50 µJ energy were achieved, and the output beam quality was nearly diffraction-limited. The output pulse duration was 8 times shorter than duration of the initial oscillator pulses due to utilization of SPM induced spectral broadening in the stretcher fiber. The presented FCPA system uses a simple oscillator, is compatible with all-fiber design (excluding a compressor) and thus is highly suitable for industrial applications, where robustness and compactness are desirable.

Acknowledgment

This work has been supported by the Research Council of Lithuania with project No MIP-099/2011 (FEMTOSKAIDULA).

References and Links

1.

Y.-C. Jeong, A. J. Boyland, J. K. Sahu, S.-H. Chung, J. Nilsson, and D. N. Payne, “Multi-kilowatt single-mode ytterbium-doped large-core fiber laser,” J. Opt. Soc. Korea 13(4), 416–422 (2009). [CrossRef]

2.

D. Strickland and G. Mourou, “Compression of amplified chirped optical pulses,” Opt. Commun. 56(3), 219–221 (1985). [CrossRef]

3.

T. T. Alkeskjold, M. Laurila, L. Scolari, and J. Broeng, “Single-mode ytterbium-doped large-mode-area photonic bandgap rod fiber amplifier,” Opt. Express 19(8), 7398–7409 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

J. Li, X. Peng, and L. Dong, “Robust fundamental mode operation in a ytterbium-doped leakage channel fiber with an effective area of ~3000µm2,” in Advanced Solid-State Photonics, OSA Technical Digest Series (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2007), paper ME3.

5.

C.-H. Liu, G. Chang, N. Litchinister, D. Guertin, N. Jacobson, K. Tankala, and A. Galvanauskas, “Chirally coupled core fibers at 1550-nm and 1064-nm for effectively single-mode core size scaling,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, OSA Technical Digest Series (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2007), paper CTuBB3.

6.

M. D. Perry, T. Ditmire, and B. C. Stuart, “Self-phase modulation in chirped-pulse amplification,” Opt. Lett. 19(24), 2149–2151 (1994). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

S. Zhou, L. Kuznetsova, A. Chong, and F. Wise, “Compensation of nonlinear phase shifts with third-order dispersion in short-pulse fiber amplifiers,” Opt. Express 13(13), 4869–4877 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

L. Kuznetsova and F. W. Wise, “Scaling of femtosecond Yb-doped fiber amplifiers to tens of microjoule pulse energy via nonlinear chirped pulse amplification,” Opt. Lett. 32(18), 2671–2673 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9.

L. Shah, Z. Liu, I. Hartl, G. Imeshev, G. Cho, and M. Fermann, “High energy femtosecond Yb cubicon fiber amplifier,” Opt. Express 13(12), 4717–4722 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

10.

D. Mortag, T. Theeg, K. Hausmann, L. Grüner-Nielsen, K. G. Jespersen, U. Morgner, D. Wandt, D. Kracht, and J. Neumann, “Sub-200 fs microjoule pulses from a monolithic linear fiber CPA system,” Opt. Commun. 285(5), 706–709 (2012). [CrossRef]

11.

T. Eidam, J. Rothhardt, F. Stutzki, F. Jansen, S. Hädrich, H. Carstens, C. Jauregui, J. Limpert, and A. Tünnermann, “Fiber chirped-pulse amplification system emitting 3.8 GW peak power,” Opt. Express 19(1), 255–260 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

R. Paschotta, J. Nilsson, A. C. Tropper, and D. C. Hanna, “Ytterbium-doped fiber amplifiers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 33(7), 1049–1056 (1997). [CrossRef]

13.

D. N. Schimpf, J. Limpert, and A. Tünnermann, “Optimization of high performance ultrafast fiber laser systems to >10 GW peak power,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 27(10), 2051–2060 (2010). [CrossRef]

14.

D. Schimpf, E. Seise, J. Limpert, and A. Tünnermann, “Decrease of pulse-contrast in nonlinear chirped-pulse amplification systems due to high-frequency spectral phase ripples,” Opt. Express 16(12), 8876–8886 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

15.

J. Lægsgaard, “Control of fibre laser mode-locking by narrow-band Bragg gratings,” J. Phys. B-At. Mol. Opt. 41(9), 095401 (2008). [CrossRef]

16.

G. Agrawal, Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 3rd ed. (Academic, 2001).

17.

T. Erdogan, “Fiber grating spectra,” J. Lightwave Technol. 15(8), 1277–1294 (1997). [CrossRef]

18.

D. U. Noske, N. Pandit, and J. R. Taylor, “Source of spectral and temporal instability in soliton fiber lasers,” Opt. Lett. 17(21), 1515–1517 (1992). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

OCIS Codes
(060.2320) Fiber optics and optical communications : Fiber optics amplifiers and oscillators
(060.4370) Fiber optics and optical communications : Nonlinear optics, fibers
(140.3510) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, fiber
(140.7090) Lasers and laser optics : Ultrafast lasers

ToC Category:
Fiber Optics and Optical Communications

History
Original Manuscript: January 4, 2013
Revised Manuscript: February 9, 2013
Manuscript Accepted: February 12, 2013
Published: February 25, 2013

Citation
J. Želudevičius, R. Danilevičius, K. Viskontas, N. Rusteika, and K. Regelskis, "Femtosecond fiber CPA system based on picosecond master oscillator and power amplifier with CCC fiber," Opt. Express 21, 5338-5345 (2013)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-21-5-5338


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References

  1. Y.-C. Jeong, A. J. Boyland, J. K. Sahu, S.-H. Chung, J. Nilsson, and D. N. Payne, “Multi-kilowatt single-mode ytterbium-doped large-core fiber laser,” J. Opt. Soc. Korea13(4), 416–422 (2009). [CrossRef]
  2. D. Strickland and G. Mourou, “Compression of amplified chirped optical pulses,” Opt. Commun.56(3), 219–221 (1985). [CrossRef]
  3. T. T. Alkeskjold, M. Laurila, L. Scolari, and J. Broeng, “Single-mode ytterbium-doped large-mode-area photonic bandgap rod fiber amplifier,” Opt. Express19(8), 7398–7409 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. J. Li, X. Peng, and L. Dong, “Robust fundamental mode operation in a ytterbium-doped leakage channel fiber with an effective area of ~3000µm2,” in Advanced Solid-State Photonics, OSA Technical Digest Series (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2007), paper ME3.
  5. C.-H. Liu, G. Chang, N. Litchinister, D. Guertin, N. Jacobson, K. Tankala, and A. Galvanauskas, “Chirally coupled core fibers at 1550-nm and 1064-nm for effectively single-mode core size scaling,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, OSA Technical Digest Series (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2007), paper CTuBB3.
  6. M. D. Perry, T. Ditmire, and B. C. Stuart, “Self-phase modulation in chirped-pulse amplification,” Opt. Lett.19(24), 2149–2151 (1994). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. S. Zhou, L. Kuznetsova, A. Chong, and F. Wise, “Compensation of nonlinear phase shifts with third-order dispersion in short-pulse fiber amplifiers,” Opt. Express13(13), 4869–4877 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  8. L. Kuznetsova and F. W. Wise, “Scaling of femtosecond Yb-doped fiber amplifiers to tens of microjoule pulse energy via nonlinear chirped pulse amplification,” Opt. Lett.32(18), 2671–2673 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  9. L. Shah, Z. Liu, I. Hartl, G. Imeshev, G. Cho, and M. Fermann, “High energy femtosecond Yb cubicon fiber amplifier,” Opt. Express13(12), 4717–4722 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  10. D. Mortag, T. Theeg, K. Hausmann, L. Grüner-Nielsen, K. G. Jespersen, U. Morgner, D. Wandt, D. Kracht, and J. Neumann, “Sub-200 fs microjoule pulses from a monolithic linear fiber CPA system,” Opt. Commun.285(5), 706–709 (2012). [CrossRef]
  11. T. Eidam, J. Rothhardt, F. Stutzki, F. Jansen, S. Hädrich, H. Carstens, C. Jauregui, J. Limpert, and A. Tünnermann, “Fiber chirped-pulse amplification system emitting 3.8 GW peak power,” Opt. Express19(1), 255–260 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  12. R. Paschotta, J. Nilsson, A. C. Tropper, and D. C. Hanna, “Ytterbium-doped fiber amplifiers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron.33(7), 1049–1056 (1997). [CrossRef]
  13. D. N. Schimpf, J. Limpert, and A. Tünnermann, “Optimization of high performance ultrafast fiber laser systems to >10 GW peak power,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B27(10), 2051–2060 (2010). [CrossRef]
  14. D. Schimpf, E. Seise, J. Limpert, and A. Tünnermann, “Decrease of pulse-contrast in nonlinear chirped-pulse amplification systems due to high-frequency spectral phase ripples,” Opt. Express16(12), 8876–8886 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  15. J. Lægsgaard, “Control of fibre laser mode-locking by narrow-band Bragg gratings,” J. Phys. B-At. Mol. Opt.41(9), 095401 (2008). [CrossRef]
  16. G. Agrawal, Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 3rd ed. (Academic, 2001).
  17. T. Erdogan, “Fiber grating spectra,” J. Lightwave Technol.15(8), 1277–1294 (1997). [CrossRef]
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