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Optics Express

  • Editor: Andrew M. Weiner
  • Vol. 22, Iss. 2 — Jan. 27, 2014
  • pp: 2119–2125
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Monolithic polarization diversity coherent receiver based on 120-degree optical hybrids on silicon

Po Dong, Chongjin Xie, and Lawrence L. Buhl  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 22, Issue 2, pp. 2119-2125 (2014)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.22.002119


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Abstract

We present a monolithic polarization diversity coherent receiver by employing 120-degree optical hybrids on a silicon photonic integrated circuit (PIC). This PIC monolithically integrates silicon inverse tapers for fiber coupling, silicon polarization splitters, germanium high-speed photo detectors, and 120-degree optical hybrids based on 3x3 multimode interferometers (MMI). We demonstrate that 112-Gb/s polarization-division-multiplexed quadrature phase-shift keyed signals are detected in the wavelength range of 1530-1580 nm with comparable performance to commercial receivers.

© 2014 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

Advanced modulation formats are key enablers to increase the capacity of optical transport networks with a channel rate of 100 Gb/s and beyond [1

1. T. Okoshi and K. Kikuchi, Coherent Optical Fiber Communications (Kluwer, 1998).

5

5. M. Berger, “100G challenges and solutions,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference/National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference (2010), Market Watch Session.

]. Coherent optical detection with digital signal processing (DSP) not only enables high spectral efficiency systems, but provides cost-effective electronic equalization of transmission impairments and network monitoring as well. Classical coherent detection utilizes 90-degree optical hybrids to mix the incoming optical signal with a local oscillator (LO), into a pair of balanced photodiodes to detect the amplitude and phase of the signal. Such coherent receivers have been realized in discrete component formats, hybrid planar lightwave circuits (PLCs) with photo detectors [6

6. T. Inoue and K. Nara, “Ultrasmall PBS-integrated coherent mixer using 1.8%-delta silica-based planar lightwave circuit,” in European Conference on Optical Communication (2010), paper Mo.2.F.4.

12

12. T. Ohyama, I. Ogawa, H. Tanobe, R. Kasahara, S. Tsunashima, T. Yoshimatsu, H. Fukuyama, T. Itoh, Y. Sakamaki, Y. Muramoto, H. Kawakami, M. Ishikawa, S. Mino, and K. Murata, “All-in-one 112-Gb/s DP-QPSK optical receiver front-end module using hybrid integration of silica-based planar lightwave circuit and photodiode arrays,” IEEE Photonics Technol. Lett. 24(8), 646–648 (2012). [CrossRef]

], InP photonic integrated circuits (PICs) [13

13. H. Takeuchi, K. Kasaya, Y. Kondo, H. Yasaka, K. Oe, and Y. Imamura, “Monolithic integrated coherent receiver on InP substrate,” IEEE Photonics Technol. Lett. 1(11), 398–400 (1989). [CrossRef]

21

21. M. Schell, H. Bach, K. Janiak, N. Keil, M. Moehrle, P. Runge, and Z. Zhang, “Coherent receiver PICs,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference/National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference (2013), paper OW3J.6. [CrossRef]

], and silicon PICs [22

22. C. R. Doerr, L. L. Buhl, Y. Baeyens, R. Aroca, S. Chandrasekhar, X. Liu, L. Chen, and Y.-K. Chen, “Packaged monolithic silicon 112-Gb/s coherent receiver,” IEEE PhotonicsTechnol. Lett. 23(12), 762–764 (2011). [CrossRef]

24

24. P. Dong, X. Liu, C. Sethumadhavan, L. L. Buhl, R. Aroca, Y. Baeyens, and Y. Chen, “Monolithic silicon photonic circuits enable 112-Gb/s PDM-QPSK transmission over 2560-km SSMF,” in Proc. ECOC’13 (2013), paper We.2.B.1.

]. The PIC solution promises compactness, low cost, and low power consumption. In particular, silicon PICs offer the additional advantage of polarization diversity by using grating couplers [22

22. C. R. Doerr, L. L. Buhl, Y. Baeyens, R. Aroca, S. Chandrasekhar, X. Liu, L. Chen, and Y.-K. Chen, “Packaged monolithic silicon 112-Gb/s coherent receiver,” IEEE PhotonicsTechnol. Lett. 23(12), 762–764 (2011). [CrossRef]

] or on-chip polarization beam splitters/rotators (PBS/PR) [23

23. P. Dong, X. Liu, C. Sethumadhavan, L. L. Buhl, R. Aroca, Y. Baeyens, and Y. Chen, “224-Gb/s PDM-16-QAM modulator and receiver based on silicon photonic integrated circuits,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference/National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference (2013), paper PDP5C.6. [CrossRef]

,24

24. P. Dong, X. Liu, C. Sethumadhavan, L. L. Buhl, R. Aroca, Y. Baeyens, and Y. Chen, “Monolithic silicon photonic circuits enable 112-Gb/s PDM-QPSK transmission over 2560-km SSMF,” in Proc. ECOC’13 (2013), paper We.2.B.1.

].

Coherent optical detection can also be achieved by mixing a signal with an LO in other kinds of optical hybrids, such as 120-degree hybrids with three single-ended detectors [25

25. T. Pfau, S. Hoffmann, O. Adamczyk, R. Peveling, V. Herath, M. Porrmann, and R. Noé, “Coherent optical communication: Towards realtime systems at 40 Gbit/s and beyond,” Opt. Express 16(2), 866–872 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. In general, balanced detection is superior in suppressing various noises, preferable for long-haul transmission driven by high performance requirements. Single-ended detection, however, may be lower in cost because of simpler transimpedance amplifiers (TIA) and less RF connections between optical and electrical interfaces. Compared with 90-degree hybrids, 120-degree hybrids have an intrinsically broader optical bandwidth [26

26. A. Besse, M. Bachmann, H. Melchior, L. B. Soldano, and M. K. Smit, “Optical bandwidth and fabrication tolerances of multimode interference couplers,” J. Lightwave Technol. 12(6), 1004–1009 (1994). [CrossRef]

], larger fabrication tolerance, and the ability to mitigate hardware-induced imperfections from analog-digital converters and digital signal processors. These advantages were numerically demonstrated by using a multi-mode interferometer (MMI) as a 120-degree hybrid [27

27. P. J. Reyes-Iglesias, I. Molina-Fernández, A. Moscoso-Mártir, and A. Ortega-Moñux, “High-performance monolithically integrated 120° downconverter with relaxed hardware constraints,” Opt. Express 20(5), 5725–5741 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,28

28. P. J. Reyes-Iglesias, A. Ortega-Moñux, and I. Molina-Fernández, “Enhanced monolithically integrated coherent 120° downconverter with high fabrication yield,” Opt. Express 20(21), 23013–23018 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. As colorless detection over the whole telecommunication wavelength is preferable in high-capacity networks, broad-bandwidth optical hybrids for coherent detection would be demanded.

Xie et al. presented colorless detection of a large number of channels by suppressing LO relative intensity noise (RIN) and direct-detection signal terms using a 3x3 fiber coupler with discrete photo detectors (PDs) [29

29. C. Xie, P. J. Winzer, G. Raybon, A. H. Gnauck, B. Zhu, T. Geisler, and B. Edvold, “Colorless coherent receiver using 3x3 coupler hybrids and single-ended detection,” Opt. Express 20(2), 1164–1171 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. In this paper, we present a highly compact integrated version on a silicon PIC, which monolithically integrates PBSs, MMI-based 120-degree hybrids, and germanium PDs. We demonstrate that our monolithic polarization diversity coherent receiver has a comparable performance to commercial receivers with 90-degree hybrids over a 1530-1580 nm wavelength range.

2. Theory

If a signal and an LO are launched into a symmetric 3x3 MMI with 1:1:1 power splitting, its three output photo currents are
(I1I2I3)=13(|EL|2+|Es|2|EL|2+|Es|2|EL|2+|Es|2)+23(|EL||Es|cos(φ+2/3π)|EL||Es|cos(φ)|EL||Es|cos(φ2/3π))
(1)
where EL and Es are the electrical fields of the LO and signal, respectively, and φ represents the phase difference between them. The first term in Eq. (1) is the direct-detection term and the second term is the beat term, with a 120-degree difference among its three components. A proper rearrangement of the photo currents can yield the currents for in-phase/quadrature (I/Q) components with the suppression of the direct-detection term [29

29. C. Xie, P. J. Winzer, G. Raybon, A. H. Gnauck, B. Zhu, T. Geisler, and B. Edvold, “Colorless coherent receiver using 3x3 coupler hybrids and single-ended detection,” Opt. Express 20(2), 1164–1171 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]:

{II=I20.5I10.5I3=|EL||Es|cosφIQ=3/2(I3I1)=|EL||Es|sinφ
(2)

From MMI theory [26

26. A. Besse, M. Bachmann, H. Melchior, L. B. Soldano, and M. K. Smit, “Optical bandwidth and fabrication tolerances of multimode interference couplers,” J. Lightwave Technol. 12(6), 1004–1009 (1994). [CrossRef]

], the optical bandwidth of a MMI is proportional to the square of the ratio between waveguide width and MMI width. Hence, a 3x3 MMI has a larger intrinsic bandwidth than a 4x4 MMI 90-degree hybrid, resulting in larger fabrication tolerance which is needed for silicon and InP PIC fabrication.

3. Silicon PIC

We designed a silicon PIC with the circuit diagram shown in Fig. 1(a)
Fig. 1 Dual-polarization coherent receiver based on 120-degree hybrids. (a) Circuit diagram. (b) Photo of a fully fabricated PIC. (c) Photo of the packaged PIC with fibers and circuit boards.
. The PIC includes two mode converters for fiber coupling based on inverse tapers, two polarization splitters based on silicon waveguide directional couplers, two silicon MMI-based 120-degree hybrids for TE and TM modes respectively, and six germanium PDs. The device information for PBSs and PDs has been reported in [30

30. T.-Y. Liow, K.-W. Ang, Q. Fang, J.-F. Song, Y.-Z. Xiong, M.-B. Yu, G.-Q. Lo, and D.-L. Kwong, “Silicon modulators and germanium photodetectors on SOI: monolithic integration, compatibility, and performance optimization,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 16(1), 307–315 (2010). [CrossRef]

32

32. P. Dong, C. Xie, L. Chen, L. L. Buhl, and Y. K. Chen, “112-Gb/s monolithic PDM-QPSK modulator in silicon,” Opt. Express 20(26), B624–B629 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Both MMIs have a width of 12 μm and a length of 360 μm for TE and 270 μm for TM, respectively. The PIC was fabricated on an 8” silicon-on-insulator wafer with a top silicon thickness of 220 nm. The overall chip size is only 1.5 mm x 2.3 mm, with a photo in Fig. 1(b). The signal and LO are coupled into the chip from top/bottom sides [see Fig. 1(b)]. After coupling in, both signal and LO are split into TE and TM components. Same polarizations proceed to a 120-degree hybrid whose outputs are connected to three germanium PDs. After fabrication and initial characterizations, the chip was packaged with two cleaved single-mode fibers (SMFs) and two printed circuit boards with RF connectors [see Fig. 1(c)]. No TIAs were available for packaging this device.

4. Fiber-to-PD responsivities

Prior to the packaging, we measured the fiber-to-PD responsivities by launching an external-cavity tunable laser with a tuning range of 1520-1580 nm. Cleaved single-mode fibers were used. A polarization controller was used to adjust the input polarization. Figure 2
Fig. 2 Fiber-to-PD responsivities.
shows the responsivity for the six detectors when either TE or TM was launched into the chip. For the three PDs at the TE side, the PDs’ fiber-to-PD responsivities range between 0.13 and 0.145 A/W at the peak wavelength of ~1530 nm, and drop to about 0.1 A/W at 1580 nm. The responsivity drop may mainly be attributed to the PDs’ own spectral dependence. It is well known that for germanium on silicon, the absorption coefficients decrease beyond a wavelength of ~1565 nm. For TM-side PDs, the peak responsivities are about 0.1-0.118 A/W at a wavelength of ~1545 nm. The smaller peak responsivities for TM-side detectors are mainly induced by the insertion loss from PBSs. The PBSs based on silicon directional couplers were designed to have a coupling efficiency of >95% for TM but less than 2% for TE. Therefore, the TM light experiences more loss than TE (5% versus 2% in theory). For spectral dependence of TM, at the shorter wavelengths, the responsivity drops may also result from the PBS loss. The MMI hybrids were designed to have a 1-dB bandwidth of about 100 nm and therefore are expected to have less impact on the responsivity spectra. In summary, the spectral responses of germanium PDs, PBSs, MMI hybrids and mode converters all contribute to the responsivity spectra. Further studies of each individual component are needed to fully explain the results in Fig. 2. To break down the loss, the total fiber-to-PD insertion loss is about 4.5-5.5 dB, including a ~2.5-dB fiber coupling loss, a ~1.0-dB waveguide propagation loss, a ~0.5-dB MMI excess loss, and a ~1.0-dB detector loss. In addition, the polarization extinction ratios are more than 20 dB for the wavelength range of 1520-1580 nm, indicated by the responsivity of TE-side (or TM-side) PDs when the launched polarization is TM (or TE). These results demonstrate that the receiver can work for the wavelength range of 1520-1580 nm, covering more than the whole C-band.

We characterized the PD speed by launching an on-off-keying signal at 30 Gb/s with a wavelength of 1546 nm. The signal was modulated by a high-speed electro-absorption modulator with a CW laser input. The PD was biased at 2 V and a high-speed RF probe with a 50 ohm terminator was employed to collect the eye diagrams. The input polarization was set to either TE or TM depending on which side of the PDs locates. Figure 3
Fig. 3 Eye diagrams of six germanium PDs at 30 Gb/s.
presents the eye diagrams for all six germanium PDs, with excellent eye openings. The frequency response of the PDs with the same design reported in [23

23. P. Dong, X. Liu, C. Sethumadhavan, L. L. Buhl, R. Aroca, Y. Baeyens, and Y. Chen, “224-Gb/s PDM-16-QAM modulator and receiver based on silicon photonic integrated circuits,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference/National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference (2013), paper PDP5C.6. [CrossRef]

] also verified that their 3-dB bandwidths exceed 20 GHz. These measurements indicate that the receiver can detect 30-Gbaud coherent optical signals.

5. 112-Gb/s PDM-QPSK detection

Figure 4
Fig. 4 Experimental setup for characterizing the packaged silicon PIC receiver. PC: polarization controller; EDFA: erbium doped fiber amplifier; VOA: variable optical attenuator; LO: local oscillator; DSP: digital signal processing.
shows the experimental setup for testing the packaged receiver with polarization-division-multiplexed quadrature phase-shift keyed (PDM-QPSK) signals. The PDM-QPSK signal was generated by a commercial I/Q LiNbO3 modulator driven by 28-Gb/s pseudorandom bit sequences (PRBSs) of length 215–1 followed by a polarization multiplexer. We launched the signal at ~3 dBm and an LO at ~20 dBm into the chip. We used a polarization controller to adjust the polarization of LO prior to the PIC. The receiver output was connected to a real-time sampling oscilloscope equipped with six 40-Gsamples/s analog-to-digital converters with a bandwidth of 20 GHz. The received signals were analyzed with offline processing. For the offline DSP, the sampling skew was first corrected and the signal was synchronously sampled to 2 samples per symbol. The in-phase and quadrature components of the signal in each polarization were obtained with the operation described in Eq. (2). A butterfly equalizer with 19 taps adapted via the constant modulus algorithm was used for polarization demultiplexing and inter-symbol interference compensation [33

33. S. J. Savory, “Digital coherent optical receivers: algorithms and subsystems,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 16(5), 1164–1179 (2010). [CrossRef]

]. Carrier phase estimation was performed with the Viterbi & Viterbi algorithm [34

34. A. J. Viterbi and A. M. Viterbi, “Nonlinear estimation of PSK-modulated carrier phase with application to burst digital transmission,” IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory 29(4), 543–551 (1983). [CrossRef]

]. Differential decoding was used in the detection, and bit error ratios (BERs) were calculated using direct error counting.

Figures 5(a)
Fig. 5 Coherent detection of 112-Gb/s PDM-QPSK signals. (a-b) Captured signal I1 to I2 for two polarizations without DSP. (c-j) Constellations for two polarizations at 20 dB OSNR after DSP.
and 5(b) show the plots of captured I1 versus I2 signals without any DSP for TE (a) and TM (b) branches. Plots of I1 versus I3 and I2 versus I3 are similar. The 2π/3 phase difference between I1 and I2 is evident from the tilt of the elliptical signal cloud. After DSP, the constellations were successfully recovered, shown in Figs. 5(c)5(j) with an optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) of 20 dB for four wavelengths from 1530.72 nm to 1580.35 nm. The performance of BER averaged over two polarizations versus OSNR is shown in Fig. 6
Fig. 6 BER averaged over two polarizations as a function of OSNR (noise measured in 0.1 nm).
for four wavelengths, covering more than the whole C-band. For the wavelength of 1549.70 nm and 1565.50 nm, the device requires an OSNR of 15.4 dB at a BER of 10−3, which is 1.6 dB away from the theoretical limit. At 1530.72 nm, this OSNR requirement is 16.0 dB. The slight performance degradation at short wavelengths may be due to hybrid phase errors and also the LO high noises from optical amplifiers. For the wavelength of 1580.35 nm, an OSNR of 16.3 dB is required at a BER of 10−3, which may also be due to LO high noises. For a typical commercial coherent receiver based on discrete components with 90-degree hybrids, the OSNR requirement for a BER of 10−3 is in the range of 15.5-16 dB for differential decoding in lab experiments. Therefore, our extremely compact integrated optical device has a comparable BER performance. It is to be noted that this comparison does not include the impact of TIAs. As balanced TIAs may perform better than single-ended TIAs on suppressing noises, more rigorous comparisons are needed if both types of optical hybrids can be packaged with TIA arrays.

6. Conclusion

We have demonstrated a polarization diversity coherent receiver on a silicon PIC by using 120-degree optical hybrids instead of classical 90-degree hybrids. 112-Gb/s PDM-QPSK signals were detected over the wavelength range of 1530-1580 nm, with a BER performance comparable with commercial receivers. As coherent technology is expected to be soon employed in metro and shorter-distance networks, the demonstrated receiver may be a crucial candidate for low-cost and colorless coherent detection. Together with compact I/Q modulators demonstrated on silicon [32

32. P. Dong, C. Xie, L. Chen, L. L. Buhl, and Y. K. Chen, “112-Gb/s monolithic PDM-QPSK modulator in silicon,” Opt. Express 20(26), B624–B629 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 35

35. P. Dong, C. Xie, L. Chen, N. K. Fontaine, and Y.-K. Chen, “Experimental demonstration of microring quadrature phase-shift keying modulators,” Opt. Lett. 37(7), 1178–1180 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

37

37. P. Dong, L. Chen, C. Xie, L. L. Buhl, and Y.-K. Chen, “50-Gb/s silicon quadrature phase-shift keying modulator,” Opt. Express 20(19), 21181–21186 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], silicon photonics could be a viable and powerful platform of photonic integrated circuits in coherent optical communications.

Acknowledgments

We thank T.-Y. Liow and G.-Q. Lo of the Institute of Microelectronics, Singapore on fabrication, Y.-K. Chen, P. J. Winzer, D. Neilson, M. Zirngibl, and J. Fernandes from Bell Labs for their support.

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13.

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21.

M. Schell, H. Bach, K. Janiak, N. Keil, M. Moehrle, P. Runge, and Z. Zhang, “Coherent receiver PICs,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference/National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference (2013), paper OW3J.6. [CrossRef]

22.

C. R. Doerr, L. L. Buhl, Y. Baeyens, R. Aroca, S. Chandrasekhar, X. Liu, L. Chen, and Y.-K. Chen, “Packaged monolithic silicon 112-Gb/s coherent receiver,” IEEE PhotonicsTechnol. Lett. 23(12), 762–764 (2011). [CrossRef]

23.

P. Dong, X. Liu, C. Sethumadhavan, L. L. Buhl, R. Aroca, Y. Baeyens, and Y. Chen, “224-Gb/s PDM-16-QAM modulator and receiver based on silicon photonic integrated circuits,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference/National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference (2013), paper PDP5C.6. [CrossRef]

24.

P. Dong, X. Liu, C. Sethumadhavan, L. L. Buhl, R. Aroca, Y. Baeyens, and Y. Chen, “Monolithic silicon photonic circuits enable 112-Gb/s PDM-QPSK transmission over 2560-km SSMF,” in Proc. ECOC’13 (2013), paper We.2.B.1.

25.

T. Pfau, S. Hoffmann, O. Adamczyk, R. Peveling, V. Herath, M. Porrmann, and R. Noé, “Coherent optical communication: Towards realtime systems at 40 Gbit/s and beyond,” Opt. Express 16(2), 866–872 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

26.

A. Besse, M. Bachmann, H. Melchior, L. B. Soldano, and M. K. Smit, “Optical bandwidth and fabrication tolerances of multimode interference couplers,” J. Lightwave Technol. 12(6), 1004–1009 (1994). [CrossRef]

27.

P. J. Reyes-Iglesias, I. Molina-Fernández, A. Moscoso-Mártir, and A. Ortega-Moñux, “High-performance monolithically integrated 120° downconverter with relaxed hardware constraints,” Opt. Express 20(5), 5725–5741 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

28.

P. J. Reyes-Iglesias, A. Ortega-Moñux, and I. Molina-Fernández, “Enhanced monolithically integrated coherent 120° downconverter with high fabrication yield,” Opt. Express 20(21), 23013–23018 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

29.

C. Xie, P. J. Winzer, G. Raybon, A. H. Gnauck, B. Zhu, T. Geisler, and B. Edvold, “Colorless coherent receiver using 3x3 coupler hybrids and single-ended detection,” Opt. Express 20(2), 1164–1171 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

30.

T.-Y. Liow, K.-W. Ang, Q. Fang, J.-F. Song, Y.-Z. Xiong, M.-B. Yu, G.-Q. Lo, and D.-L. Kwong, “Silicon modulators and germanium photodetectors on SOI: monolithic integration, compatibility, and performance optimization,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 16(1), 307–315 (2010). [CrossRef]

31.

L. Chen, C. R. Doerr, and Y.-K. Chen, “Compact polarization rotator on silicon for polarization-diversified circuits,” Opt. Lett. 36(4), 469–471 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

32.

P. Dong, C. Xie, L. Chen, L. L. Buhl, and Y. K. Chen, “112-Gb/s monolithic PDM-QPSK modulator in silicon,” Opt. Express 20(26), B624–B629 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

33.

S. J. Savory, “Digital coherent optical receivers: algorithms and subsystems,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 16(5), 1164–1179 (2010). [CrossRef]

34.

A. J. Viterbi and A. M. Viterbi, “Nonlinear estimation of PSK-modulated carrier phase with application to burst digital transmission,” IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory 29(4), 543–551 (1983). [CrossRef]

35.

P. Dong, C. Xie, L. Chen, N. K. Fontaine, and Y.-K. Chen, “Experimental demonstration of microring quadrature phase-shift keying modulators,” Opt. Lett. 37(7), 1178–1180 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

36.

P. Dong, C. Xie, L. L. Buhl, and Y. Chen, “Silicon microring modulators for advanced modulation formats,” in Optical Fiber Communication Conference/National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference (2013), paper OW4J.2. [CrossRef]

37.

P. Dong, L. Chen, C. Xie, L. L. Buhl, and Y.-K. Chen, “50-Gb/s silicon quadrature phase-shift keying modulator,” Opt. Express 20(19), 21181–21186 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

OCIS Codes
(060.1660) Fiber optics and optical communications : Coherent communications
(130.0250) Integrated optics : Optoelectronics
(230.5160) Optical devices : Photodetectors
(250.5300) Optoelectronics : Photonic integrated circuits

ToC Category:
Optical Communications

History
Original Manuscript: December 13, 2013
Revised Manuscript: January 13, 2014
Manuscript Accepted: January 14, 2014
Published: January 24, 2014

Citation
Po Dong, Chongjin Xie, and Lawrence L. Buhl, "Monolithic polarization diversity coherent receiver based on 120-degree optical hybrids on silicon," Opt. Express 22, 2119-2125 (2014)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-22-2-2119


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