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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: Andrew M. Weiner
  • Vol. 22, Iss. 4 — Feb. 24, 2014
  • pp: 3811–3817
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High-quality planar light emitting diode formed by induced two-dimensional electron and hole gases

Van-Truong Dai, Sheng-Di Lin, Shih-Wei Lin, Yi-Shan Lee, Yin-Jie Zhang, Liang-Chen Li, and Chien-Ping Lee  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 22, Issue 4, pp. 3811-3817 (2014)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.22.003811


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Abstract

A high-quality planar two-dimensional p-i-n light emitting diode in an entirely undoped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well has been fabricated by using conventional lithography process. With twin gate design, two-dimensional electron and hold gases can be placed closely on demand. The electroluminescence of the device exhibit high stability and clear transition peaks so it is promising for applications on electrically-driven single photon sources.

© 2014 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

Most of the III-V optoelectronic devices rely on junctions formed by stacks of epilayers, where the electrical current flows across the junction vertical to the sample surface. The lateral p-n junctions that are and difficult to fabricate, however, are often desirable for many device applications. For example, because of their coplanar geometry, they are suitable for optoelectronic integration. Since the cross section of the lateral junction is determined by the thickness of the epilayer, the capacitance of the junction can also be much smaller than that of conventional vertical ones. Thus, the 2-D lateral junctions could lead to a new family of high-frequency and optoelectronic devices [1

1. N. Tsutsui, V. Ryzhii, I. Khmyrova, P. O. Vaccaro, H. Taniyama, and T. Aida, “High-frequency performance of lateral p-n junction photodiodes,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 37(6), 830–836 (2001). [CrossRef]

6

6. G. De Simoni, L. Mahler, V. Piazza, A. Tredicucci, C. A. Nicoll, H. E. Beere, D. A. Ritchie, and F. Beltram, “Lasing in planar semiconductor diodes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 99(26), 261110 (2011). [CrossRef]

]. Furthermore, lateral 2-D p-n junctions are potential candidates for investigating the properties of electron spins in low-dimensional systems by optical methods [7

7. J. Wunderlich, B. Kaestner, J. Sinova, and T. Jungwirth, “Experimental Observation of the Spin-Hall Effect in a Two-Dimensional Spin-Orbit Coupled Semiconductor System,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 94(4), 047204 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. On the other hand, there has been an increasing interest in the surface acoustic wave (SAW)-driven single-photon sources owing to their potential applications in high-speed quantum communications [8

8. C. L. Foden, V. I. Talyanskii, G. J. Milburn, M. L. Leadbeater, and M. Pepper, “High-frequency acousto-electric single-photon source,” Phys. Rev. A 62(1), 011803 (2000). [CrossRef]

10

10. G. De Simoni, V. Piazza, L. Sorba, G. Biasiol, and F. Beltram, “Acoustoelectric luminescence from a field-effect n-i-p lateral junction,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 94(12), 121103 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. In [8

8. C. L. Foden, V. I. Talyanskii, G. J. Milburn, M. L. Leadbeater, and M. Pepper, “High-frequency acousto-electric single-photon source,” Phys. Rev. A 62(1), 011803 (2000). [CrossRef]

], Foden et al proposed that when a SAW propagates through a two-dimensional (2D) p-i-n junction, a series of traveling quantum dots are formed in the i-region of the junction. Consequently, a constant stream of electron packets, which can be manipulated by a controlled gate voltage, flows from a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) channel into a two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) channel, where electrons and holes are recombined to create bursts of optical pulses. By controlling the split gate voltage, one can obtain a stream of single electrons to generate single photons. In SAW-driven single-photon source devices, the key component is a high-quality 2-D p-i-n junction.

With the aim of reliably fabricating 2-D lateral p-n junctions, several methods have been developed over the past years [3

3. B. Kaestner, D. A. Williams, and D. G. Hasko, “Nanoscale lateral light emitting p-n junctions in AlGaAs/GaAs,” Microelectron. Eng. 67–68, 797–802 (2003). [CrossRef]

5

5. M. Cecchini, V. Piazza, F. Beltram, M. Lazzarino, M. B. Ward, A. J. Shields, H. E. Beere, and D. A. Ritchie, “High-performance planar light-emitting diodes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 82(4), 636–638 (2003). [CrossRef]

, 7

7. J. Wunderlich, B. Kaestner, J. Sinova, and T. Jungwirth, “Experimental Observation of the Spin-Hall Effect in a Two-Dimensional Spin-Orbit Coupled Semiconductor System,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 94(4), 047204 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 9

9. J. R. Gell, P. Atkinson, S. P. Bremner, F. Sfigakis, M. Kataoka, D. Anderson, G. A. C. Jones, C. H. W. Barnes, D. A. Ritchie, M. B. Ward, C. E. Norman, and A. J. Shields, “Surface-acoustic-wave-driven luminescence from a lateral p-n junction,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 89(24), 243505 (2006). [CrossRef]

15

15. B. Kaestner, D. G. Hasko, and D. A. Williams, “Lateral p-n Junction in Modulation Doped AlGaAs/GaAs,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 41(Part 1, No. 4B), 2513–2515 (2002). [CrossRef]

]. The authors in [2

2. V. Ryzhii, M. Ryzhii, V. Mitin, and T. Otsuji, “Terahertz and infrared photodetection using p-i-n multiple-graphene-layer structures,” J. Appl. Phys. 107, 054512 (2010).

,12

12. A. North, J. Burroughes, T. Burke, A. Shields, C. E. Norman, and M. Pepper, “The two-dimensional lateral injection in-plane laser,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 35(3), 352–357 (1999). [CrossRef]

,13

13. P. O. Vaccaro, H. Ohnishi, and K. Fujita, “A light-emitting device using a lateral junction grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (311)A-oriented substrates,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 72(7), 818–820 (1998). [CrossRef]

] fabricated lateral p-n junctions by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth on a patterned GaAs substrate by employing the amphoteric nature of the Si dopants to simultaneously form 2DEG on the (001) planes and 2DHG on (113)A planes. Kaestner et al. used a partially etched GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure to define 2DEG and 2DHG regions [15

15. B. Kaestner, D. G. Hasko, and D. A. Williams, “Lateral p-n Junction in Modulation Doped AlGaAs/GaAs,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 41(Part 1, No. 4B), 2513–2515 (2002). [CrossRef]

]. In [14

14. T. Hosey, V. Talyanskii, S. Vijendran, G. A. C. Jones, M. B. Ward, D. C. Unitt, C. E. Norman, and A. J. Shields, “Lateral n-p junction for acoustoelectric nanocircuits,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 85(3), 491–493 (2004). [CrossRef]

], Hosey et al. integrated MBE growth with a focused ion beam to fabricate a lateral p-n junction. All above methods used complex technique and based on doped heterostructures. Introducing impurities affects luminescence efficiency by presenting non-radiative recombination channels. Thus, it will affect further application for single-photon devices.

In this paper, we demonstrate a novel structure utilizing induced 2DEG and 2DHG channels in an undoped GaAs quantum well to form the lateral p-i-n junction. The two different types of channels are induced via surface Schottky gates and metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) gates. The device created is not just a diode but also a transistor, as suggested by [16

16. B. Kaestner, J. Wunderlich, and T. J. B. M. Janssen, “Low-dimensional light-emitting transistor with tunable recombination zone,” J. Mod. Opt. 54(2-3), 431–439 (2007). [CrossRef]

]. The amount of current and the resulting light emitting intensity of the lateral diode are controllable by the bias voltages applied to the gates and the source and the drain. The device has a planar structure and can be easily fabricated by conventional metallization and lithography processes.

2. Sample design and process

The layer structure used for lateral junction fabrication is that of a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well shown in Fig. 1(a)
Fig. 1 (a) Sample structure grown by MBE. (b) Optical microscopy image of the finished device. (c) Schematic cross-section of the devices.
. The sample was grown on a semi-insulating (100) GaAs substrate by using a solid-source MBE system. A 400-nm Al0.33Ga0.67As was grown on top of a 100-nm GaAs buffer layer, followed by a 10-period GaAs/Al0.33Ga0.67As (3 nm/3 nm) superlattice. A 20-nm GaAs quantum well between two Al0.33Ga0.67As barriers was grown as the 2-D channel of the device. Finally, the sample was capped with a 3-nm GaAs layer. All layers are intentionally undoped.

The device processing starts with a mesa etching step to define the channel region. The n-type ohmic contact region was then defined and recessed down to the GaAs channel. All metal depositions were done by an e-gun evaporator. The n and p Ohmic contacts are formed by Ni/Ge/Au/Ni (5 nm/70 nm/70 nm/35 nm) and Pd/AuZn (40 nm/100 nm) then annealed at 450 °C and 420 °C for 2 mins, respectively. After the gate recess using H2O:H3PO4:H2O2 (1:3:50) to a depth of 150 nm, the Schottky gate metal of Ti/Au (20 nm/80 nm) for both n and p channels was deposited to form the surface gate (SG). A 350-nm photosensitive polyimide, serving as an insulator layer, was then coated and patterned. Finally, the metal Ti/Au (20 nm/200 nm) was deposited on top of the polyimide layer to form the top gate (TG). The top view of a finished device is shown in Fig. 1(b). The upper half is the p-channel device and the lower half is the n-channel device. The devices are normally off because the epitaxy layers are totally undoped.

3. Results and discussion

Figure 2(a)
Fig. 2 Current – voltage characteristics of 2DEG and 2DHG with bias between two Ohmic Vds = 500 mV at temperature of 4 K. (a) Current – TG voltage characteristics of 2DHG with different SG voltages, −0.4 V (dashed line)and −0.6 V (solid line). The inset shows current – TG voltage characteristics of 2DEG. (b) Current – SG voltage characteristics of 2DHG with different TG voltages, −0.8 V (solid line), −1.0 V (dot line), and −1.2 V (dashed line). The inset shows current – SG voltage characteristics of 2DEG channel.
shows the drain current versus p-TG voltage (denoted as Vptg) curve for the p-channel with the drain-source (two p-type Ohmic contacts) voltage, Vds, set at 500 mV. The two different curves correspond to two different p-SG voltages of −0.4 V and −0.6 V. The p-TG threshold voltage is −0.8 V, which stays constant for the two p-SG voltages. The transconductance is higher for Vpsg = −0.6V as expected because more carriers are induced in the channel. The same measurements were performed for n-channel of the devices. The inset of Fig. 2(a) shows the drain current versus n-TG voltage curve of the n-channel with n-SG voltage Vnsg = 0.9 V and the drain-source (two n-type Ohmic contacts) voltage Vds of 500 mV. The threshold voltage of the n-TG is 3.2 V. The higher threshold voltage of the n-channel is probably due to the surface state pinning at the insulator/semiconductor interface [18

18. R. H. Harrell, K. S. Pyshkin, M. Y. Simmons, D. A. Ritchie, C. J. B. Ford, G. A. C. Jones, and M. Pepper, “Fabrication of high-quality one- and two-dimensional electron gases in undoped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 74(16), 2328–2330 (1999). [CrossRef]

]. Figure 2(b) shows the drain current versus p-SG voltage Vpsg for the p-channel at Vds = 500 mV. Different curves correspond to different p-TG voltages. The p-SG threshold voltage is −0.2 V. The saturation current is higher for higher Vptg, because the series resistance between the channel and the source Ohmic contact is reduced when Vptg increases. The Ids- Vnsg curve for the n-channel with Vntg = 6 V and Vds = 500 mV is shown in the inset of Fig. 2(b). The threshold voltage of the n-SG is 0.5 V. Leakage currents to gates were negligible so the stability of the induced carriers is pretty good.

By biasing the n- and p-channel devices above their threshold voltages, the electrical characteristics of the p-i-n device were then measured. The measurement configuration is shown in the inset of Fig. 3
Fig. 3 Linear and logarithmic current – voltage characteristics of the lateral 2-D p-i-n diode at temperature of 4 K with p-TG and n-TG biased at Vptg = −3 V and Vntg = + 6 V, respectively, and p-SG and n-SG biased at Vpsg = −0.6 V and Vnsg = + 0.9 V, respectively. Vpn is the operation voltage of the diode. The inset shows measurement configuration.
. The p-TG bias Vptg and p-SG bias Vpsg of the p-channel device were set at −3 V and −0.6 V respectively and those of the n-channel device were Vntg = + 6 V and Vnsg = + 0.9 V. The current flow between the p-channel and the n-channel, denoted as Ipn, was measured as a function of the voltage applied between the p and n ohmic contacts Vpn; see inset of Fig. 3. In the measurement setup, the gate voltages for the N channel were measured relative to the source (the ohmic contact on the left), and the voltage of the P gates were measured relative to the drain (the ohmic contact on the right). So with this setup, the channel condition for both the N channel and the P channel remains the same when Vpn is changed. The current Ipn in Fig. 3 is plotted both in the linear and logarithmic scales for clarity. One can see clearly the rectifying behavior with turn-on voltages of 1.73 V. Very good exponential behavior was observed all the way down to the measurement limit. The current of the diode can go up to hundreds of microamperes. Two kinks occur in the I-V curve at Vpn = 1.48 and 1.70 V. The kink position slightly changes with the surface gate bias. Thus, they could be attributed to the potential barriers for hole at p-i junction and for electron at the n-i junction. However, further investigations are needed to address this issue.

The electroluminescence (EL) emission of the p-i-n diode measured at 4 K is shown in Fig. 4(a)
Fig. 4 (a) Electroluminescence spectra of the lateral 2D p-i-n diode at temperature of 4 K with with p-TG and n-TG biasing at Vptg = −3 V and Vntg = + 6 V, respectively and p-SG and n-SG biasing at Vpsg = −0.6 V and Vnsg = + 0.9 V, respectively and Vpn from 1.6 V to 2.0 V with step 0.05 V. Inset shows photoluminescent spectrum at 4 K. (b) Light integrated intensity versus forward bias voltage of the lateral 2D p-i-n diode measured at the same condition. Inset shows the light integrated intensity (black curve with triangle symbol) and external efficiency (blue curve with round symbol) versus the diode current.
. The device was measured under the surface gate voltages of Vnsg = + 0.9 V and Vpsg = −0.6 V, and the top gate voltages of Vntg = 6 V and Vptg = −3 V, and the junction voltage from Vpn = 1.6 V to 2.0 V with step of 0.05 V. The inset of Fig. 4(a) shows the measure photoluminescence (PL) of the sample. We clearly observe two peaks in the PL spectra at 1.5205 eV (815.5 nm) and 1.5239 eV (813.7 nm). The intensity ratio of the two PL peaks remains constant when the excitation power changes. Thus, the two peaks observed here are most likely due to the roughness of the quantum well interfaces [19

19. M. A. Herman, D. Bimberg, and J. Christen, “Heterointerfaces in quantum wells and epitaxial growth processes: Evaluation by luminescence techniques,” J. Appl. Phys. 70(2), R1–R52 (1991). [CrossRef]

]. There are also two peaks at 1.5174 eV (817.5 nm) and 1.5207 eV (815.4 nm) in the EL spectra. The peaks have a 0.4 meV redshift when the junction bias Vpn increases from 1.6 V to 2.0 V. Full width at half maximum of the 1.5205 eV peak changes from 1.2 to 2.2 meV, and that of the other peak from 1.2 to 3 meV when Vpn increases from 1.6 V to 2.0 V. The narrow linewidths of the peaks demonstrate that the 2-D channel is of high-quality, which is essential for further applications such as electrically-driven single photon sources.

Figure 4(b) shows the integrated intensity of the EL spectra (black curve with square symbol) against the junction bias Vpn. Light intensity increases linearly with diode voltage Vpn. Inset of Fig. 4(b) shows the integrated intensity of the EL spectra (black curve with triangle symbol) and external efficiency (blue curve with round symbol) versus the diode current Ipn. At low currents, Ipn < 5.0 µA, after an initial set back, the light intensity rises sharply with current. At higher currents, Ipn > 5.0 µA (after the diode turns on, Vpn > 1.73 V), the light intensity increases with current at a constant rate. However, the slope of L-I curve is much smaller in comparison to low injection currents. The result can be explained as follows. At low currents, radiative recombination mostly happens in the i-region. But at high currents, electrons are injected into the p-region under p-SG and holes are injected into the n-region under n-SG. So, as a result, part of the radiation is blocked by the gate metal. Consequently, light collection efficiency decreases. This can be seen in the external efficiency curve in inset of Fig. 4(b). With the increasing forward current Ipn from 0.0 µA to 5.0 µA, the external quantum efficiency increases to a maximum of 0.003%, then it drops dramatically for Ipn > 5.0 µA (after the diode turn on, Vpn > 1.73 V). This problem could be avoided by using semi-transparent metal gate.

The electroluminescence emission spectra of our devices are stable and much cleaner than those of previously reported lateral 2-D junctions [5

5. M. Cecchini, V. Piazza, F. Beltram, M. Lazzarino, M. B. Ward, A. J. Shields, H. E. Beere, and D. A. Ritchie, “High-performance planar light-emitting diodes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 82(4), 636–638 (2003). [CrossRef]

, 7

7. J. Wunderlich, B. Kaestner, J. Sinova, and T. Jungwirth, “Experimental Observation of the Spin-Hall Effect in a Two-Dimensional Spin-Orbit Coupled Semiconductor System,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 94(4), 047204 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 9

9. J. R. Gell, P. Atkinson, S. P. Bremner, F. Sfigakis, M. Kataoka, D. Anderson, G. A. C. Jones, C. H. W. Barnes, D. A. Ritchie, M. B. Ward, C. E. Norman, and A. J. Shields, “Surface-acoustic-wave-driven luminescence from a lateral p-n junction,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 89(24), 243505 (2006). [CrossRef]

, 14

14. T. Hosey, V. Talyanskii, S. Vijendran, G. A. C. Jones, M. B. Ward, D. C. Unitt, C. E. Norman, and A. J. Shields, “Lateral n-p junction for acoustoelectric nanocircuits,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 85(3), 491–493 (2004). [CrossRef]

]. This is important for using the device for further studies and applications. For example, Kim et al. used simultaneous Coulomb blockade for electrons and holes in a mesoscopic double barrier p-n junction to fabricate a single-photon turnstile [20

20. J. Kim, O. Benson, H. Kan, and Y. Yamamoto, “A single-photon turnstile device,” Nature 397(6719), 500–503 (1999). [CrossRef]

]. And recently, Kaestner et al. [21

21. B. Kaestner, V. Kashcheyevs, S. Amakawa, M. D. Blumenthal, L. Li, T. J. B. M. Janssen, G. Hein, K. Pierz, T. Weimann, U. Siegner, and H. W. Schumacher, “Single-parameter nonadiabatic quantized charge pumping,” Phys. Rev. B 77(15), 153301 (2008). [CrossRef]

] and Fletcher et al. [22

22. J. D. Fletcher, M. Kataoka, S. P. Giblin, S. Park, H. S. Sim, P. See, D. A. Ritchie, J. P. Griffiths, G. A. C. Jones, H. E. Beere, and T. J. B. M. Janssen, “Stabilization of single-electron pumps by high magnetic fields,” Phys. Rev. B 86(15), 155311 (2012). [CrossRef]

] have successfully fabricated a stable single-electron pump on a 2DEG GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure, we can make a single-photon source device by fabrication a single-electron pump on the i-region of the lateral p-i-n junction device. Thus, single hot electron can be pumped into 2DHG region and then single photon emitted as electron-hole recombination occurs. In this aspect, high repetition-rate and electrically-driven single photon source could be realized in coming years.

4. Conclusion

In conclusion, we have developed a relatively simple method to fabricate high-quality planar light emitting diode. By using the surface gate and top gate design, 2DEG and 2DHG can be induced side by side in a completely undoped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well. The electrical and optical properties of the device show that the 2-D channel is of high quality. Our results demonstrate that the device is promising for applications in the single-photon devices.

Acknowledgments

We would like to acknowledge the Center of Nano Science and Technology at National Chiao Tung University for their equipment support. This work was financially supported by the National Science Council and ATU program of Ministry of Education in Taiwan.

References and links

1.

N. Tsutsui, V. Ryzhii, I. Khmyrova, P. O. Vaccaro, H. Taniyama, and T. Aida, “High-frequency performance of lateral p-n junction photodiodes,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 37(6), 830–836 (2001). [CrossRef]

2.

V. Ryzhii, M. Ryzhii, V. Mitin, and T. Otsuji, “Terahertz and infrared photodetection using p-i-n multiple-graphene-layer structures,” J. Appl. Phys. 107, 054512 (2010).

3.

B. Kaestner, D. A. Williams, and D. G. Hasko, “Nanoscale lateral light emitting p-n junctions in AlGaAs/GaAs,” Microelectron. Eng. 67–68, 797–802 (2003). [CrossRef]

4.

B. Kaestner, J. Wunderlich, J. Sinova, and T. Jungwirth, “Co-planar spin-polarized light-emitting diodes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 88(9), 091106 (2006). [CrossRef]

5.

M. Cecchini, V. Piazza, F. Beltram, M. Lazzarino, M. B. Ward, A. J. Shields, H. E. Beere, and D. A. Ritchie, “High-performance planar light-emitting diodes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 82(4), 636–638 (2003). [CrossRef]

6.

G. De Simoni, L. Mahler, V. Piazza, A. Tredicucci, C. A. Nicoll, H. E. Beere, D. A. Ritchie, and F. Beltram, “Lasing in planar semiconductor diodes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 99(26), 261110 (2011). [CrossRef]

7.

J. Wunderlich, B. Kaestner, J. Sinova, and T. Jungwirth, “Experimental Observation of the Spin-Hall Effect in a Two-Dimensional Spin-Orbit Coupled Semiconductor System,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 94(4), 047204 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

C. L. Foden, V. I. Talyanskii, G. J. Milburn, M. L. Leadbeater, and M. Pepper, “High-frequency acousto-electric single-photon source,” Phys. Rev. A 62(1), 011803 (2000). [CrossRef]

9.

J. R. Gell, P. Atkinson, S. P. Bremner, F. Sfigakis, M. Kataoka, D. Anderson, G. A. C. Jones, C. H. W. Barnes, D. A. Ritchie, M. B. Ward, C. E. Norman, and A. J. Shields, “Surface-acoustic-wave-driven luminescence from a lateral p-n junction,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 89(24), 243505 (2006). [CrossRef]

10.

G. De Simoni, V. Piazza, L. Sorba, G. Biasiol, and F. Beltram, “Acoustoelectric luminescence from a field-effect n-i-p lateral junction,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 94(12), 121103 (2009). [CrossRef]

11.

J. M. Z. Ocampo, P. O. Vaccaro, S. Saravanan, K. Kubota, and T. Aida, “Lasing characteristics and modal gain of a lateral-junction InGaAs/GaAs edge-emitting laser diode grown on a patterned GaAs (311) A-oriented substrate,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 82(18), 2951–2953 (2003). [CrossRef]

12.

A. North, J. Burroughes, T. Burke, A. Shields, C. E. Norman, and M. Pepper, “The two-dimensional lateral injection in-plane laser,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 35(3), 352–357 (1999). [CrossRef]

13.

P. O. Vaccaro, H. Ohnishi, and K. Fujita, “A light-emitting device using a lateral junction grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (311)A-oriented substrates,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 72(7), 818–820 (1998). [CrossRef]

14.

T. Hosey, V. Talyanskii, S. Vijendran, G. A. C. Jones, M. B. Ward, D. C. Unitt, C. E. Norman, and A. J. Shields, “Lateral n-p junction for acoustoelectric nanocircuits,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 85(3), 491–493 (2004). [CrossRef]

15.

B. Kaestner, D. G. Hasko, and D. A. Williams, “Lateral p-n Junction in Modulation Doped AlGaAs/GaAs,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 41(Part 1, No. 4B), 2513–2515 (2002). [CrossRef]

16.

B. Kaestner, J. Wunderlich, and T. J. B. M. Janssen, “Low-dimensional light-emitting transistor with tunable recombination zone,” J. Mod. Opt. 54(2-3), 431–439 (2007). [CrossRef]

17.

V. T. Dai, S. D. Lin, S. W. Lin, J. Y. Wu, L. C. Li, and C. P. Lee, “Lateral Two-Dimensional p-i-n Diode in a Completely Undoped GaAs/AlGaAs Quantum Well,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 52(1R), 014001 (2013). [CrossRef]

18.

R. H. Harrell, K. S. Pyshkin, M. Y. Simmons, D. A. Ritchie, C. J. B. Ford, G. A. C. Jones, and M. Pepper, “Fabrication of high-quality one- and two-dimensional electron gases in undoped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 74(16), 2328–2330 (1999). [CrossRef]

19.

M. A. Herman, D. Bimberg, and J. Christen, “Heterointerfaces in quantum wells and epitaxial growth processes: Evaluation by luminescence techniques,” J. Appl. Phys. 70(2), R1–R52 (1991). [CrossRef]

20.

J. Kim, O. Benson, H. Kan, and Y. Yamamoto, “A single-photon turnstile device,” Nature 397(6719), 500–503 (1999). [CrossRef]

21.

B. Kaestner, V. Kashcheyevs, S. Amakawa, M. D. Blumenthal, L. Li, T. J. B. M. Janssen, G. Hein, K. Pierz, T. Weimann, U. Siegner, and H. W. Schumacher, “Single-parameter nonadiabatic quantized charge pumping,” Phys. Rev. B 77(15), 153301 (2008). [CrossRef]

22.

J. D. Fletcher, M. Kataoka, S. P. Giblin, S. Park, H. S. Sim, P. See, D. A. Ritchie, J. P. Griffiths, G. A. C. Jones, H. E. Beere, and T. J. B. M. Janssen, “Stabilization of single-electron pumps by high magnetic fields,” Phys. Rev. B 86(15), 155311 (2012). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(230.3670) Optical devices : Light-emitting diodes
(230.5590) Optical devices : Quantum-well, -wire and -dot devices

ToC Category:
Optoelectronics

History
Original Manuscript: November 4, 2013
Revised Manuscript: December 19, 2013
Manuscript Accepted: January 8, 2014
Published: February 11, 2014

Citation
Van-Truong Dai, Sheng-Di Lin, Shih-Wei Lin, Yi-Shan Lee, Yin-Jie Zhang, Liang-Chen Li, and Chien-Ping Lee, "High-quality planar light emitting diode formed by induced two-dimensional electron and hole gases," Opt. Express 22, 3811-3817 (2014)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-22-4-3811


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References

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