OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: Andrew M. Weiner
  • Vol. 22, Iss. 7 — Apr. 7, 2014
  • pp: 8001–8011
« Show journal navigation

Refractive laser beam shaping by means of a functional differential equation based design approach

Fabian Duerr and Hugo Thienpont  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 22, Issue 7, pp. 8001-8011 (2014)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.22.008001


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (989 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

Many laser applications require specific irradiance distributions to ensure optimal performance. Geometric optical design methods based on numerical calculation of two plano-aspheric lenses have been thoroughly studied in the past. In this work, we present an alternative new design approach based on functional differential equations that allows direct calculation of the rotational symmetric lens profiles described by two-point Taylor polynomials. The formalism is used to design a Gaussian to flat-top irradiance beam shaping system but also to generate a more complex dark-hollow Gaussian (donut-like) irradiance distribution with zero intensity in the on-axis region. The presented ray tracing results confirm the high accuracy of both calculated solutions and emphasize the potential of this design approach for refractive beam shaping applications.

© 2014 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

Many commercial, medical and scientific applications of the laser have been developed since its invention. Materials processing applications, like cutting or welding; and medical applications, like corneal surgery are just a few examples. Many of these applications require a specific beam irradiance distribution to ensure an optimal performance [1

1. F. M. Dickey, S. C. Holswade, and D. L. Shealy, Laser Beam Shaping Applications (CRC Press, 2005). [CrossRef]

]. There are several optical technologies that can be used for laser beam shaping, including simple apertures, diffractive optical elements [2

2. D. Palima and J. Glückstad, “Gaussian to uniform intensity shaper based on generalized phase contrast,” Opt. Express 16, 1507–1516 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], lenses [3

3. J. A. Hoffnagle and C. M. Jefferson, “Design and performance of a refractive optical system that converts a Gaussian to a flattop beam,” Appl. Opt. 39, 5488–5499 (2000). [CrossRef]

] and mirrors [4

4. V. Oliker, “Optical design of freeform two-mirror beam-shaping systems,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 24, 3741–3752 (2007). [CrossRef]

]. The right choice depends on the optical design problem. Refractive laser beam shapers are commonly used due to their high optical efficiency and simple structure [5

5. L. Romero and F. Dickey, “Lossless laser beam shaping,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 13, 751–760 (1996). [CrossRef]

].

Often, it is possible to apply geometrical methods to shape a laser beam profile. This common design approach is based on the ray mapping between the input and the output plane which takes into account conservation of energy, a constant optical path length of the geometric wave-front between the input and output planes, and the ray trace equations. Geometric ray mapping-based designs with two plano-aspheric lenses have been thoroughly studied and improved [6

6. P. W. Rhodes and D. L. Shealy, “Refractive optical systems for irradiance redistribution of collimated radiation: their design and analysis,” Appl. Opt. 19, 3545–3553 (1980). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

10

10. Z. Feng, L. Huang, G. Jin, and M. Gong, “Designing double freeform optical surfaces for controlling both irradiance and wavefront,” Opt. Express 21, 28693–28701 (2013). [CrossRef]

]. Figure 1 shows a typical Galilean configuration (without internal focusing) of a refractive laser beam shaper consisting of two plano-aspheric lenses transforming a Gaussian input into a flattop output intensity distribution with a gradual roll-off from the uniform to null region. The indicated geometric ray mapping then describes where an initial parallel ray with radial distance r is refracted at the first aspherical surface to be redirected in parallel direction with radial distance R at the second aspherical surface.

Fig. 1 Typical configuration of a refractive laser beam shaper consisting of two planoaspheric lenses. The 1st surface redistributes while the 2nd surface recollimates the rays.

Even though analytic expressions of ray mapping functions do exist for some specific cases, the surface profiles of the lenses are still calculated numerically. The main idea of most common geometrical optics design approaches is to describe the laser beam shaping design problem by mathematical equations and then use numerical techniques to solve the particular equation. Solutions have been found in the form of an integral equation, by Kreuzer, ordinary differential equation, by Rhodes and Shealy, and Monge-Ampère equation, by Oliker. Usually, a set of discrete data points is obtained using numerical calculation techniques and the final profiles of the lenses are constructed by either polynomial or spline fitting.

Starting from the example of a Gaussian to flat-top irradiance beam shaping system in Fig. 1, a set of two functional differential equations are derived in Sec. 2. The mathematical problem is then converted into a set of linear algebraic equations that allows calculating analytic symbolic expressions for the lens profiles f and g described by two-point Taylor series expansions. To further demonstrate the versatility of this new approach, a second design problem is solved in Sec. 3 to generate a more complex dark-hollow Gaussian (donut-like) irradiance profile with zero intensity in the on-axis region. Here, the mapping function is given by a fractional Taylor series which has direct impact on the surface representation as well. The presented ray tracing evaluation confirm the high accuracy of both calculated solutions and emphasize the potential of this design approach for refractive beam shaping applications.

2. Analytic solution to convert a Gaussian into a flat-top irradiance distribution

If the lenses are rotationally symmetric and described by surfaces of revolution, this means that the problem can be examined in a plane. The input irradiance distribution is given by the Gaussian function
Iin(r)=2/(πw02)exp[2(rw0)2]
(1)
with 1/e2 width w0. To avoid diffraction effects in regions of abrupt irradiance change and to increase the distance over which the uniform irradiance distribution can be used [13

13. D. L. Shealy and J. A. Hoffnagle, “Review: design and analysis of plano-aspheric laser beam shapers,” Proc. SPIE 8490, 849003 (2012). [CrossRef]

], the output intensity is chosen as a flattened Lorentzian (FL) distribution
IFL(R)=1πRFL2(1+(R/RFL)q)1+q2
(2)
which has a flat central region and a gradual roll-off to the null region, shown in Fig. 1. Where q denotes the beam shape parameter and RFL is the beam width parameter of the flattened Lorentzian [13

13. D. L. Shealy and J. A. Hoffnagle, “Review: design and analysis of plano-aspheric laser beam shapers,” Proc. SPIE 8490, 849003 (2012). [CrossRef]

]. The input encircled energy is calculated as a function of r as
A(r)=0rIin(r)2πrdr=1exp[2(rw0)2]
(3)
and the output encircled energy as a function of R as
B(R)=0RIFL(R)2πRdR=[1+(R/RFL)q](2/q)
(4)
From conservation of energy between the input and the output plane, it is possible to determine the output radial distance R as a function of the given input coordinate r such that the encircled energies A and B are equal, that is
R(r)=εRFL1exp[2(rw0)2]1[1exp[2(rw0)2]]q/2q
(5)
where ε is equal to +1 for a Galilean and −1 for a Keplerian configuration. An explicit mapping function R(r) that transforms a Gaussian into a flattened Lorentzian irradiance distribution is shown as dotted line in Fig. 2(a) for ε = 1, w0 = 2.366mm, RFL = 3.25mm and q = 16.

Fig. 2 (a) In comparison to the one-point Taylor series expansion about r1 that does not converge everywhere, the two-point Taylor series expansion about r1 and r2 approximates the mapping function R(r) (dotted line) for all values r. (b) Introduction of all necessary initial values and functions to derive the conditional equations from Fermat’s principle.

Now that the output coordinate value R can be calculated for every input coordinate r, it is possible to derive an integral representation for the sag of each aspherical lens that can be solved numerically following the work of Kreuzer, Shealy and Hoffnagle [13

13. D. L. Shealy and J. A. Hoffnagle, “Review: design and analysis of plano-aspheric laser beam shapers,” Proc. SPIE 8490, 849003 (2012). [CrossRef]

].

Instead of following this well-known design approach, an alternative solution strategy will be explained hereafter. As both incoming and outgoing geometric wave-fronts are plane (i.e. all rays are parallel), the two plane surfaces in Fig. 1 have no optical power and can be neglected by assuming that the in- and output rays are immersed in a medium with refractive index n2. This is shown in Fig. 2(b). Consider an arbitrary light ray path. The ray is emitted from a point v⃗0 on the plane incident wave-front and intersects the first surface at a point p⃗ = (r, f(r)), where it is refracted towards (R(r), g(R(r))) on the second surface and refracted again towards the plane outgoing wave-front (parallel to the z-axis). The path of the light rays are governed by Fermat’s principle which states that the optical path length (OPL) between two points is an extremum along the light ray containing these points. The OPL between points v⃗0, p⃗ and (R(r), g(R(r))) is given by
V1=n2n0(pv0)+((rR(r))2+(f(r)g(R(r)))2
(6)
where n⃗0 denotes the directional vector of the wave-front in z-direction. If the points v⃗0 and (R(r), g(R(r))) are fixed, the only free parameter that can vary to achieve an extremum for V1 is the point p⃗ and hence r on the first lens surface. Fermat’s principle thus implies that
D1=rV1=0
(7)
where the partial derivative indicates that R is held fixed. Furthermore, the slope of the first aspheric surface at point (r, f(r)) must be equal to the slope on the second aspheric surface at point (R, g(R)) as a result of symmetry of the input and output wave-fronts. This can be expressed in a second condition
D2=f(r)rg(r)|r=R(r)=0
(8)
where the partial derivative rg(r) is evaluated at position R(r). This specific formulation highlights the functional character of the optical design problem. As the mapping function R is a function of r and appears as an argument in the unknown function g, Eqs. (7) and (8) form a pair of functional differential equations for two unknown functions f(r) and g(R(r)).

The initial conditions
f(r1)=z1f(r2)=z2f(r1)=m1f(r2)=m2g(r3)=z3g(r4)=z4g(r3)=m3g(r4)=m4R(r1)=r3R(r2)=r4
(13)
as introduced in Fig. 2(b) then satisfy the conditional equations Di = 0 for i = 1, 2 and provide general solutions for the initial two-point Taylor series coefficients depending upon the single variable z2. In ascending order, it is now possible to calculate (2k + 1)th order Taylor polynomials of f(r) and g(r) by calculating the derivatives and evaluating equations
limrr1nrnDi=0,limrr2nrnDi=0for(i=1,2),{n1}
(14)
symbolically at points r1 and r2. For the case n = 0, the initial Taylor series coefficients p0, p1, q0, q1, u0, u1, v0 and v1 as defined in Eqs. (13) solve Eqs. (14).

For every higher order n ≥ 1, the set of equations (14) results in four linear algebraic equations for two-point Taylor series coefficients pi, qi, ui and vi. By sorting and combining all terms, the equations can be expressed as a compact matrix equation for particular two-point Taylor series coefficients for arbitrary n ≥ 1. The elements of the linear algebraic equations consist of mathematical expressions only dependent on previously calculated Taylor series coefficients. Therefore, all two-point Taylor series coefficients can be calculated as exact symbolic expressions in ascending order - step by step. So far, no approximations have been made. The general solution scheme for n ≥ 1 allows to calculate successive Taylor series coefficients of f(r) and g(r) up to a very high order. The inevitable truncation of the infinite sum of terms will be the only approximation made. The radii of convergence for the Taylor expansions f(r) and g(r) are very important, as they indicate the maximum aperture that can be achieved for a given set of initial values. For the examples considered in this work, the radii of convergence are larger than the radial coordinate 0 < r < rmax of the lenses.

2.1. Evaluation of the analytic solution

Figure 3 shows the evaluation of the merit function m(z2) as a function of variable z2 for values between −0.5 and 0 mm and for a step size of 0.0025 mm. A logarithmic plot is chosen to better cover the wide range of values.

Fig. 3 The convex shape of the merit function makes it an easy task to reach an optimal value for z2 which adjusts the relative position in z-direction of the local solutions about r1 and r2 using a local optimization algorithm.

The curve in parameter space is characterized by a convex curvature which makes it easy and fast to find the optimal relative position of z2 using a local optimization in Mathematica.

To quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of the derived solution, the spatial and angular deviation is calculated for 200 rays between 0 and 4 mm along r-direction. This evaluation is performed for 7th (k=3), 13th (k=6) and 19th (k=9) order Taylor polynomials for f and g, respectively. Figure 4(a) shows the variation in optical path length (OPL) and Fig. 4(b) shows the spatial mapping error for 3 calculated solutions of different order. The root mean square values of the variation in OPL are 1.647μm (k=3), 0.617μm (k=6) and 0.058μm (k=9). The root mean square values of the mapping error are 0.559 × 10−2 (k=3), 0.061 × 10−2 (k=6) and 0.009 × 10−2 (k=9), respectively. For both graphs, the variation in OPL and mapping error reduce very well with an increasing order underlining the convergence and achievable high accuracy of the derived solution.

Fig. 4 Demonstration of the convergence of the analytic solution: (a) the variation in OPL and (b) the spatial mapping error clearly reduce with an increasing approximation order.

Furthermore, the maximum collimation error after refraction at the second plane surface is evaluated for the 3 different solutions. The maximum collimation error is 2.167mrad (k=3), 1.124mrad (k=6) and 0.265mrad (k=9). The achieved collimation quality for k=9 is clearly better than the maximum collimation error of 0.8mrad in [7

7. J. A. Hoffnagle and C. M. Jefferson, “Beam shaping with a plano-aspheric lens pair,” Opt. Eng. 42, 3090–3099 (2003). [CrossRef]

]. Further improvements, if necessary, can be achieved by increasing the order of the Taylor polynomials and/or by adjusting the positions of points r1 and r2, respectively.

3. Analytic solution for Gaussian to dark-hollow Gaussian refractive beam shapers

The existence of a closed-form expression for the mapping function was important for the design approach in Sec. 2 to work. The following example will demonstrate that this is not a necessary condition. The optical design problem of a refractive beam shaper that transforms a Gaussian into a dark-hollow Gaussian (DHG) intensity profile with zero intensity at the optical axis does not allow to calculate a closed-form expression for the mapping function, as will be shown in the following. Focused small ring patterns are of interest for some industrial applications such as laser cladding technology. Figure 5 shows the cross-section of the correspondent setup together with the in- and output intensity profiles.

Fig. 5 Illustration of a laser beam shaping system based on two plano-aspheric lenses that transforms a Gaussian into a dark-hollow Gaussian (DHG) beam with zero intensity at the optical axis.

The input irradiance distribution is again given by the Gaussian function as defined in Eq. (1). The output intensity distribution is given by
IDHG(R)=H0(R2w12)2nexp[2(Rw1)2]
(15)
where n denotes the order of the DHG beam and H0 is a constant that is adjusted to conserve the overall energy. For n = 0, Eq. (15) reduces to the fundamental beam with beam waist w1 [15

15. Y. Cai, X. Lu, and Q. Lin, “Hollow Gaussian beams and their propagation properties,” Opt. Lett. 28, 1084–1086 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

Fig. 6 (a) The mapping function R(r) is given as a Taylor series expansion of the inverse function of the mapping function r(R). (b) Introduction of all necessary initial values and functions to derive the conditional equations from Fermat’s principle.

To solve this design problem, it is better to solve its inverse problem: where a dark-hollow Gaussian is transformed into a Gaussian beam. This inverse optical design problem is identical due to the symmetry of the optical design where both in- and outgoing geometric wave-fronts are plane. The inverted design is shown in Fig. 6(b), where the reversed directions of the rays are indicated. As done previously, this time from right to left, the OPL between points v⃗0, p⃗ = (R, g(R)) and (r(R), f(r(R))) is given by
V2=n2n0(pv0)+(Rr(R))2+(g(R)f(r(R)))2
(19)
and by using the same arguments as before, Fermat’s principle implies that
D3=RV2=0
(20)
where the partial derivative indicates that r is held fixed. To ensure recollimation of the rays, the second condition is given by
D4=g(R)Rf(R)|R=r(R)=0
(21)
where the partial derivative R f(R) is evaluated at position r(R). The surface g(R) is defined by a two-point Taylor series expansion of (2k + 1)th order
g(R)=i=0k[ui(RR1)+vi(RR2)][(RR1)(RR2)]i
(22)
By evaluation derivatives of Eqs. (20) and (21) at points R1 and R2 in ascending order
limRR1nRnDi=0,limRR2nRnDi=0for(i=3,4),{n1}
(23)
it is possible to calculate the Taylor coefficients of g(R) in ascending order up to high orders. However, a similar two-point Taylor polynomial of function f still does not converge for all points R. From Eq. (21) follows that it is also possible to calculate the second surface profile f(r(R)) from the integral equation
f(R)=0Rg(R(r))dr
(24)
for known functions g(R) and R(r). By substituting the mapping function R(r) from Eq. (18) as argument in the first derivative g′(R), the unknown function f(R) can be exactly calculated via symbolic integration. The function f(R) is then described by a polynomial function
f(R)=f0+i=1kfiR(i+2)/3=f0+f1R1+f2R4/3+f3R5/3+f4R2++fkR(k+2)/3
(25)
with fractional exponents. This circumstance explains why a conventional Taylor series approach with integer exponents does not work properly. The integration constant f0 is calculated by applying the constant OPL condition at point R2. Interestingly, the coefficient f1 is almost zero (less than 10−8) and identical to the slope value g′(0), providing smooth lens shapes in the central on-axis region. Due to the substitution of the mapping function R(r) in g′(R), f(R) easily results in a very high order polynomial. Even though it is not necessary, this function can be truncated to a moderate order in the range of function g(R) without changing the performance.

3.1. Evaluation of the analytic solution

The performance evaluation of the analytic solution for Gaussian to dark-hollow Gaussian (DHG) beam shaping is carried out analogously to Sec. 2.1. The parameters of the in- and output intensity distributions are w0 = 2.366mm, w1 = 2mm and n = 1. The two manually selected points of the Taylor series are R1 = 0.3mm and R2 = 4.2mm. By fixing the distance between Z1 = 0mm and Z2 = 16mm and the refractive index n2 = 1.5, the remaining parameter Z2 that adjusts the relative positioning in z-direction is optimized for an identical merit function as defined in Sec. 2.1. Figure 7(a) shows the variation in OPL and Fig. 7(b) shows the spatial mapping error for 3 different solutions of different order. All calculations have been repeated for 200 rays between 0 and 4 mm along r-direction (which corresponds to ≈ 99.7% encircled input energy). The evaluation is performed for 7th (k=3), 11th (k=5) and 15th (k=7) order Taylor polynomials for g, and f has been truncated to 21th order.

Fig. 7 Demonstration of the convergence of the analytic solution: (a) the variation in OPL and (b) the spatial mapping error clearly reduce with an increasing approximation order.

4. Conclusion

Within the scope of this work, it has been shown how the optical design of refractive laser beam shaping systems based on two plano-aspheric lenses can be described by means of a new mathematical formulation using functional differential equations. The derived solution scheme has been successfully verified for two specific design tasks and allows an increasingly accurate calculation of the lens profiles described by high order Taylor polynomials. In case of the flattened Lorentzian beam shaping system, a maximum collimation error value of 0.265mrad has been achieved. If required, a higher accuracy seems feasible with this new design approach.

Particularly noteworthy is the successful implementation of a two-point Taylor series expansion that could be also of interest for other optical designs, for example in imaging systems [16

16. F. Duerr, Y. Meuret, and H. Thienpont, “Potential benefits of free-form optics in on-axis imaging applications with high aspect ratio,” Opt. Express 21, 31072–31081 (2013). [CrossRef]

]. Here, a multi-point Taylor series approach could be used to generalize the optical design for more than two surfaces that allows the simultaneous coupling of more than three ray-bundles.

Acknowledgments

The work reported in this paper is supported in part by the Research Foundation - Flanders (FWO-Vlaanderen) that provides a post-doctoral grant to Fabian Duerr, and in part by the IAP-BELSPO grant IAP P7-35 photonics@be, the Industrial Research Funding (IOF), Methusalem, and the OZR of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel.

References and links

1.

F. M. Dickey, S. C. Holswade, and D. L. Shealy, Laser Beam Shaping Applications (CRC Press, 2005). [CrossRef]

2.

D. Palima and J. Glückstad, “Gaussian to uniform intensity shaper based on generalized phase contrast,” Opt. Express 16, 1507–1516 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

J. A. Hoffnagle and C. M. Jefferson, “Design and performance of a refractive optical system that converts a Gaussian to a flattop beam,” Appl. Opt. 39, 5488–5499 (2000). [CrossRef]

4.

V. Oliker, “Optical design of freeform two-mirror beam-shaping systems,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 24, 3741–3752 (2007). [CrossRef]

5.

L. Romero and F. Dickey, “Lossless laser beam shaping,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 13, 751–760 (1996). [CrossRef]

6.

P. W. Rhodes and D. L. Shealy, “Refractive optical systems for irradiance redistribution of collimated radiation: their design and analysis,” Appl. Opt. 19, 3545–3553 (1980). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

J. A. Hoffnagle and C. M. Jefferson, “Beam shaping with a plano-aspheric lens pair,” Opt. Eng. 42, 3090–3099 (2003). [CrossRef]

8.

H. Ma, Z. Liu, P. Jiang, X. Xu, and S. Du, “Improvement of Galilean refractive beam shaping system for accurately generating near-diffraction-limited flattop beam with arbitrary beam size,” Opt. Express 19, 13105–13117 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9.

J. Rubinstein and G. Wolansky, “Intensity control with a free-form lens,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 24, 463–469 (2007). [CrossRef]

10.

Z. Feng, L. Huang, G. Jin, and M. Gong, “Designing double freeform optical surfaces for controlling both irradiance and wavefront,” Opt. Express 21, 28693–28701 (2013). [CrossRef]

11.

F. Duerr, P. Benítez, J. C. Miñano, Y. Meuret, and H. Thienpont, “Analytic design method for optimal imaging: coupling three ray sets using two free-form lens profiles,” Opt. Express 20, 5576–5585 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

F. Duerr, P. Benítez, J. C. Miñano, Y. Meuret, and H. Thienpont, “Analytic free-form lens design in 3D: coupling three ray sets using two lens surfaces,” Opt. Express 20, 10839–10846 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

D. L. Shealy and J. A. Hoffnagle, “Review: design and analysis of plano-aspheric laser beam shapers,” Proc. SPIE 8490, 849003 (2012). [CrossRef]

14.

R. H. Estes and E. R. Lancaster, “Two-point Taylor series expansions,” NASA TMX-55759 (N67-23965) (1966).

15.

Y. Cai, X. Lu, and Q. Lin, “Hollow Gaussian beams and their propagation properties,” Opt. Lett. 28, 1084–1086 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

F. Duerr, Y. Meuret, and H. Thienpont, “Potential benefits of free-form optics in on-axis imaging applications with high aspect ratio,” Opt. Express 21, 31072–31081 (2013). [CrossRef]

17.

F. Duerr, Y. Meuret, and H. Thienpont, “Tailored free-form optics with movement to integrate tracking in concentrating photovoltaics,” Opt. Express 21, A401–A411 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

OCIS Codes
(080.2720) Geometric optics : Mathematical methods (general)
(080.2740) Geometric optics : Geometric optical design
(080.3620) Geometric optics : Lens system design
(140.3300) Lasers and laser optics : Laser beam shaping

ToC Category:
Geometric Optics

History
Original Manuscript: January 27, 2014
Revised Manuscript: March 2, 2014
Manuscript Accepted: March 22, 2014
Published: March 28, 2014

Citation
Fabian Duerr and Hugo Thienpont, "Refractive laser beam shaping by means of a functional differential equation based design approach," Opt. Express 22, 8001-8011 (2014)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-22-7-8001


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. F. M. Dickey, S. C. Holswade, D. L. Shealy, Laser Beam Shaping Applications (CRC Press, 2005). [CrossRef]
  2. D. Palima, J. Glückstad, “Gaussian to uniform intensity shaper based on generalized phase contrast,” Opt. Express 16, 1507–1516 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. J. A. Hoffnagle, C. M. Jefferson, “Design and performance of a refractive optical system that converts a Gaussian to a flattop beam,” Appl. Opt. 39, 5488–5499 (2000). [CrossRef]
  4. V. Oliker, “Optical design of freeform two-mirror beam-shaping systems,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 24, 3741–3752 (2007). [CrossRef]
  5. L. Romero, F. Dickey, “Lossless laser beam shaping,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 13, 751–760 (1996). [CrossRef]
  6. P. W. Rhodes, D. L. Shealy, “Refractive optical systems for irradiance redistribution of collimated radiation: their design and analysis,” Appl. Opt. 19, 3545–3553 (1980). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. J. A. Hoffnagle, C. M. Jefferson, “Beam shaping with a plano-aspheric lens pair,” Opt. Eng. 42, 3090–3099 (2003). [CrossRef]
  8. H. Ma, Z. Liu, P. Jiang, X. Xu, S. Du, “Improvement of Galilean refractive beam shaping system for accurately generating near-diffraction-limited flattop beam with arbitrary beam size,” Opt. Express 19, 13105–13117 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  9. J. Rubinstein, G. Wolansky, “Intensity control with a free-form lens,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 24, 463–469 (2007). [CrossRef]
  10. Z. Feng, L. Huang, G. Jin, M. Gong, “Designing double freeform optical surfaces for controlling both irradiance and wavefront,” Opt. Express 21, 28693–28701 (2013). [CrossRef]
  11. F. Duerr, P. Benítez, J. C. Miñano, Y. Meuret, H. Thienpont, “Analytic design method for optimal imaging: coupling three ray sets using two free-form lens profiles,” Opt. Express 20, 5576–5585 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  12. F. Duerr, P. Benítez, J. C. Miñano, Y. Meuret, H. Thienpont, “Analytic free-form lens design in 3D: coupling three ray sets using two lens surfaces,” Opt. Express 20, 10839–10846 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. D. L. Shealy, J. A. Hoffnagle, “Review: design and analysis of plano-aspheric laser beam shapers,” Proc. SPIE 8490, 849003 (2012). [CrossRef]
  14. R. H. Estes, E. R. Lancaster, “Two-point Taylor series expansions,” NASA TMX-55759 (N67-23965) (1966).
  15. Y. Cai, X. Lu, Q. Lin, “Hollow Gaussian beams and their propagation properties,” Opt. Lett. 28, 1084–1086 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  16. F. Duerr, Y. Meuret, H. Thienpont, “Potential benefits of free-form optics in on-axis imaging applications with high aspect ratio,” Opt. Express 21, 31072–31081 (2013). [CrossRef]
  17. F. Duerr, Y. Meuret, H. Thienpont, “Tailored free-form optics with movement to integrate tracking in concentrating photovoltaics,” Opt. Express 21, A401–A411 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.


« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited