OSA's Digital Library

Optical Materials Express

Optical Materials Express

  • Editor: David J. Hagan
  • Vol. 3, Iss. 5 — May. 1, 2013
  • pp: 633–644
« Show journal navigation

Near-infrared downconversion in Pr3+/Yb3+ co-doped boro-aluminosilicate glasses and LaBO3 glass ceramics

Guojun Gao and Lothar Wondraczek  »View Author Affiliations


Optical Materials Express, Vol. 3, Issue 5, pp. 633-644 (2013)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OME.3.000633


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (8431 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

We report on downconversion of one blue photon to two near-infrared (NIR) photons (~10000 cm−1) in Pr3+/Yb3+ co-doped SrO-La2O3-Al2O3-B2O3-SiO2 glasses and LaBO3 glass ceramics. The Pr3+ ions act as broadband spectral sensitizer in the spectral range of 415-505 nm. Energy transfer occurs subsequently from Pr3+ to Yb3+, followed by re-emission in the NIR spectral range. The transfer efficiency is indicated by the degree of decrease of Pr3+-related photoluminescence (PL) and PL lifetime of the 3P0 and 1D2 levels with increasing Yb3+ concentration. For the present case, we find an optimum dopant concentration of Yb2O3 of ~0.5 mol % for a Pr2O3 concentration of 1.0 mol %. A theoretical maximum of quantum efficiency of 183% is reached for 5 mol % of Yb2O3. PL characteristics (absorption cross section and emission lifetime) are further improved upon precipitation of crystalline LaBO3, where both Pr3+ and Yb3+ ions occupy La3+ sites with an assumedly statistical distribution and a high degree of partitioning.

© 2013 OSA

1. Introduction

Considering the energy level of all lanthanides, Yb3+ has been recognized as the most suitable candidate for downconversion. That is, the Yb3+ ion has only a single excited state, 2F5/2 at ~10000 cm−1, above the ground state of 2F7/2. This means that Yb3+ centers may act as efficient recipients for energy quanta of ~10000 cm−1 from any other co-dopant to emit photons with a wavelength of about ~1 µm [4

4. B. M. van der Ende, L. Aarts, and A. Meijerink, “Near-infrared quantum cutting for photovoltaics,” Adv. Mater. 21(30), 3073–3077 (2009). [CrossRef]

,19

19. V. D. Rodríguez, V. K. Tikhomirov, J. Méndez-Ramos, A. C. Yanes, and V. V. Moshchalkov, “Towards broad range and highly efficient downconversion of solar spectrum by Er3+-Yb3+ co-doped nanostructured glass-ceramics,” Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 94(10), 1612–1617 (2010). [CrossRef]

]. To effectively sensitize Yb3+ to the UV-Vis spectral region, a donor ion with an energy level at ~20000 cm−1 is necessary. For this, Pr3+, Er3+, Nd3+, Ho3+, Tm3+, Tb3+ or Ce3+ may be employed. In the present report, we focus on Pr3+ to sensitize Yb3+ because the absorption bands of Pr3+ cover a broad spectral window in the blue region due to the successive energy levels of Pr3+:3PJ(J = 0, 1 and 2) [Fig. 1(b)
Fig. 1 Absorption spectra of the Pr3+/ Yb3+ co-doped SLABS glasses dependent on Yb2O3 doping concentration.
]. These absorption bands are located at approximately twice the band level of Yb3+:2F7/22F5/2 [20

20. S. Ye, B. Zhu, J. Chen, J. Luo, and J. Qiu, “Infrared quantum cutting in Tb3+,Yb3+ co-doped transparent glass ceramics containing CaF2 nanocrystals,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 92(14), 141112 (2008). [CrossRef]

22

22. Y. Xu, X. Zhang, S. Dai, B. Fan, H. Ma, J.-I. Adam, J. Ren, and G. Chen, “Efficient near-infrared downconversion in Pr3+-Yb3+ co-doped glasses and glass ceramics containing LaF3 nanocrystals,” J. Phys. Chem. C 115(26), 13056–13062 (2011). [CrossRef]

]. As host material, we chose a glass matrix which exhibits virtually universal forming capability and high compositional flexibility for well-controlled and homogeneous doping. To adjust the ligand symmetry and phonon energy, the glass composition may be selected so that in a subsequent annealing procedure, a crystalline species precipitates from the undercooled melt into which dopants are incorporated during crystallization [23

23. W. Höland and G. H. Beall, Glass Ceramic Technology (Am. Ceram. Soc., 2002).

28

28. G. Gao, N. Da, S. Reibstein, and L. Wondraczek, “Enhanced photoluminescence from mixed-valence Eu-doped nanocrystalline silicate glass ceramics,” Opt. Express 18(Suppl 4), A575–A583 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Here we employ a glass of the composition 20 SrO-20 La2O3-10 Al2O3-40 B2O3-10 SiO2 [29

29. K. L. Ley, M. Krumpelt, R. Kumar, J. H. Meiser, and I. Bloom, “Glass-ceramic sealants for solid oxide fuel cells: Par I. Physical properties,” J. Mater. Res. 11(06), 1489–1493 (1996). [CrossRef]

]. In this system, LaBO3 crystallites can be precipitated by controlled nucleation in a heat treatment process. Due to the equivalent charge and similar ionic radii of La3+ (1.16 Å, CN = 8), Pr3+ (1.13 Å, CN = 8) and Yb3+ (0.99 Å, CN = 8), we expect that the dopant species can readily be incorporated into the lattice of crystalline LaBO3 [30

30. R. Shannon, “Revised effective ionic radii and systematic studies of interatomic distances in halides and chalcogenides,” Acta Crystallogr. A 32(5), 751–767 (1976). [CrossRef]

].

2. Experimental

Precursor glass samples with nominal composition (mol %) 20 SrO-(19-x) La2O3-10 Al2O3-40 B2O3-10 SiO2-1 Pr2O3-x Yb2O3 (SLABS, x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, and 5) were produced by conventional melting in alumina crucibles at 1400°C for 2 h (air). Glass slabs were obtained after pouring the melt into a preheated (500°C) graphite mold and subsequent annealing at 550°C for 2 h. From these slabs, disks of 20 × 20 × 3.0 mm3 were cut and polished on both sides. To obtain glass ceramic samples, individual specimen were placed on alumina substrates and isothermally annealed at 800°C for up to 32 h (air).

UV-VIS-NIR absorption spectra were recorded from 300 to 2500 nm with a double-beam photo-spectrometer equipped with a 150 mm integration sphere and a PbS detector (Perkin-Elmer Lambda 950). Static and dynamic photoluminescence (PL) were studied with a high-resolution spectrofluorometer and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC, Horiba Jobin Yvon Fluorolog FL3-22) using a static Xe lamp (450 W) and a Xe flashlamp (75 W) as excitation sources. NIR PL was observed with a thermoelectrically cooled InP/InGaAs-based photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu H10330A-75). Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra were corrected over the lamp intensity with a silicon photodiode and PL spectra were corrected by the spectral response of the detector using correction spectra of the employed PMT. The crystallization process of each specimen was first analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Netzsch, Ar atmosphere) with a heating rate of 20 K min−1. To identify the crystalline phases after heat treatment, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, Siemens Kristalloflex D500, Bragg-Brentano, 30 kV/30 mA, Cu Kα) was performed with a step width of 0.02°/s and a counting time of 10 s per step over the 2θ range of 5-70°. All analyses were performed at room temperature.

3. Results and discussion

In Fig. 1 the effect of Yb2O3 concentration on optical absorption is shown. For Pr3+ singly doped SLABS glass, eight absorption peaks centered at 440, 471, 484, 591, 1003, 1416, 1515 and 1915 nm are ascribed to the inhomogeneously broadened 4f–4f transitions from the ground state 3H4 to the excited states 3P2, 3P1, 3P0, 1D2, 1G4, 3F4, 3F3 and 3F2 of Pr3+ (labels in Fig. 1) [31

31. Q. Chen, W. Zhang, X. Huang, G. Dong, M. Peng, and Q. Zhang, “Efficient down- and up-conversion of Pr3+-Yb3+ co-doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics,” J. Alloy. Comp. 513, 139–144 (2012). [CrossRef]

]. As mentioned in the introduction section, three relatively strong and overlapping absorption bands (3H43P1,2,3) cover a large part of the blue wavelength range of 415-505 nm. For the Pr3+/Yb3+ co-doped samples, the additional absorption band with a maximum at 976 nm and a shoulder peak at ~935 nm is assigned to the transition from the ground state of Yb3+, 2F7/2, to two different Stark levels of the excited state of 2F5/2. As expected, the intensity of this NIR absorption band of Yb3+ increases linearly with increasing Yb3+ doping concentration.

ηETE,x%Yb=1τx%Ybτ0%Yb
(1)

In agreement with the PL intensity change of Yb3+:2F5/22F7/2 (976 nm) upon Yb3+ concentration increase [Figs. 4(e) and 4(f)], also the effective lifetime of this emission band first increases up to ~56.6 μs for x = 0.5 and subsequently decreases for higher x, i.e., to 10.7 μs for x = 5.0.

To evaluate the potential of further enhancement of the energy transfer efficiency, glass ceramic samples were considered where LaBO3 crystallites were precipitated so that Pr3+ and Yb3+ are incorporated into the crystalline lattice on La3+ sites.

Figure 5(a)
Fig. 5 (a) DSC curve of the SLABS glass sample. (b) ex situ XRD patterns of the 1Pr3+/0.5Yb3+ co-doped SLABS glass and LaBO3 glass ceramic annealed at 800 °C for 32 hrs. (c) Crystal structure of LaBO3. Blue, black and red full sphere illustrates La3+, B3+ and O2+ respectively.
exemplarily shows a DSC curve of the SLABS glass sample with a heating rate of 20 K min−1 after baseline correction. The onset of glass transition Tg was observed at 679.5 ± 0.5 °C. Three crystallization peaks were found at 852, 926 and 948 ± 0.5 °C. Targeting the non-isothermal crystallization event at 852 °C, controlled crystallization was then performed isothermally at 800 °C for 32 h. XRD [Fig. 5(b)] of the untreated sample did not reveal any diffraction peaks, showing that the as-made glass was - within the accuracy of measurement - free of any crystalline phases. After thermal annealing, multiple intense diffraction peaks were found. These were indexed to the room-temperature orthorhombic phase of LaBO3 (JCPDS card no. 00-013-0113). In addition, XRD patterns indicate the presence of at least one further, minor crystallite species which we assign as hexagonal SrAl2B2O7 (JCPDS card no. 00-046-0621). For clarity, the tabulated diffraction patterns of both species are shown in Fig. 5(b). The lattice of LaBO3 is illustrated in Fig. 5(c). It comprises an orthorhombic aragonite-type structure and cell parameters of a = 5.104 Å, b = 8.252 Å, c = 5.872 Å, composed of LaO9 polyhedra and BO3 trigonal groups [41

41. A. Nakatsuka, O. Ohtaka, H. Arima, N. Nakayama, and T. Mizota, “Aragonite-type lanthanum orthoborate, LaBO3,” Acta Crystallogr. Sect. E Struct. Rep. Online 62(4), i103–i105 (2006). [CrossRef]

]. Due to the aforementioned similarity of ionic radii, Pr3+ and Yb3+ should readily be incorporated on La3+-sites (for comparison, the radius of B3+ is about one third, i.e., 0.41 Å, as compared to the three rare earth species) [30

30. R. Shannon, “Revised effective ionic radii and systematic studies of interatomic distances in halides and chalcogenides,” Acta Crystallogr. A 32(5), 751–767 (1976). [CrossRef]

].

Figures 6(a)
Fig. 6 Steady-state visible (a) PLE and (b) PL spectra of Pr3+, and NIR (d) PLE and (e) PL spectra of Yb3+ of the 1Pr3+/0.5Yb3+ co-doped SLABS glass and LaBO3 glass ceramic annealed at 800 °C for 32 hrs. (c) Visible (Pr3+ PL at 608 nm (3P03H6)) and (f) NIR (Yb3+ PL at 976 nm (2F5/22F7/2)) decay curves of the SLABS glass and glass ceramic annealed at 800 °C for 32 hrs excited at 445 nm monitoring PL at 608 nm of Pr3+ and 976 nm of Yb3+ respectively.
and 6(d) show PLE spectra (monitoring 608 nm PL from Pr3+ and 976 nm PL from Yb3+, respectively) of the SLABS glass and glass ceramic for x = 0.5. After crystallization, the characteristic excitation bands of Pr3+ are clearly enhanced. Not surprisingly, annealing at elevated temperature leads to a great change in the PL spectra [Figs. 6(b) and 6(e)] and decay curves [Figs. 6(c) and 6(f)], as well. For Vis PL from Pr3+ [Fig. 6(b)], the peak intensity at 608 nm increased by a factor of ~5 after crystallization. Moreover, all PL bands apparently split and sharpen notably as a result of crystallization. The latter observations indicate that Pr3+ is indeed incorporated into the LaBO3 crystal phase. A comparison of the decay curves of the Pr3+:3P03H6 PL band of the SLABS glass and the corresponding glass ceramic is shown in Fig. 6(c). Both curves can be best fit by second-order exponential equations, suggesting that in both cases a slow and a fast decay process contributes to PL. The lifetime values are obtained from the best fit. For both decay processes they increase after crystallization, i.e. from 2.4 to 7.1 μs and from 11.9 to 52.3 μs, respectively. This is taken as further evidence for the incorporation of Pr3+ into the crystallite phase. If Pr3+ is incorporated into the LaBO3 lattice, we expect that Yb3+ would behave similarly. Otherwise, energy transfer between the two species would become highly unlikely due to their spatial and configurational separation. Examining the PL spectra of Yb3+ in the NIR range for the crystallized sample [Fig. 6(e)], a strongly enhanced intensity of the peak at 976 nm is visible as compared to the as-made glass. Additionally, the peak intensity ratio of the two peaks at 976 and 997 nm, I976/I997, decreases from 2.2 to 1.5 after crystallization. We attribute the latter observation to stronger Stark splitting of the ground state of Yb3+, 2F7/2, in the LaBO3 crystalline environment. Analogous to the behavior in the as-made glass, and also similar to the behavior of Pr3+ in the LaBO3 lattice, decay curves follow a second-order exponential equation [Fig. 6(f)]. After crystallization, the two resulting lifetime values increase from 28.7 to 35.3 μs and from 149.0 to 297.3 μs, respectively, for the fast and for the slow decay process. From these observations, we conclude that also Yb3+ is incorporated into the crystallite phase.

Although on the first view, the presence of an intermediate level at about 10000 cm−1 in Pr3+, suggest a relatively simple energy transfer process, at least four different ways may be considered for the pair of Pr3+ and Yb3+, illustrated in Figs. 7(a)
Fig. 7 Energy levels diagram of Pr3+ and Yb3+, and possible energy transfer mechanism from Pr3+ to Yb3+. (a) Resonant energy transfer from Pr3+:3P0 and Pr3+:1G4 levels to two Yb3+:2F5/2 level. (b) One step first-order resonant energy transfer from Pr3+:3P0 level to Yb3+:2F5/2 and then a radiative relaxation from Pr3+:1G0 level to Pr3+:3H4 or Pr3+:3H5 level. (c) Cooperative energy transfer from one Pr3+:3P0 level to two neighboring Yb3+:2F5/2 level. (d) The first-order resonant energy transfer from Pr3+:1P2 level to Yb3+:2F5/2.
7(d). These are
  • a) two-step first-order resonant energy transfer from the 3P0 and 1G4 levels of Pr3+ to the 2F5/2 level of Yb3+, resulting in the generation of two NIR photons at ~1 µm [4

    4. B. M. van der Ende, L. Aarts, and A. Meijerink, “Near-infrared quantum cutting for photovoltaics,” Adv. Mater. 21(30), 3073–3077 (2009). [CrossRef]

    ],
  • b) single step first-order resonant energy transfer from 3P0 of Pr3+ to 2F5/2 of Yb3+, and further relaxation of 1G0 to 3H4 or 3H5 of Pr3+, resulting in one photon at ~1 µm and another one at ~1 µm (3H4) or at ~1.33 µm (3H5) [42

    42. Y. Katayama and S. Tanabe, “Mechanism of quantum cutting in Pr3+-Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics,” J. Lumin. 134, 825–829 (2013). [CrossRef]

    ],
  • c) single step second-order cooperative energy transfer from the 3P0 level of Pr3+ to two neighboring Yb3+:2F5/2 levels, resulting in the emission of photons from Yb3+ centers with a wavelength of ~1 µm [36

    36. E. van der Kolk, O. M. Ten Kate, J. W. Wiegman, D. Biner, and K. W. Krämer, “Enhanced 1G4 emission in NaLaF4: Pr3+, Yb3+ and charge transfer in NaLaF4: Ce3+, Yb3+ studied by Fourier transform luminescence spectroscopy,” Opt. Mater. 33(7), 1024–1027 (2011). [CrossRef]

    ], and
  • d) non-radiative relaxation of 3P0 to 1D2 (Pr3+), followed by first-order resonant energy transfer from Pr3+:1P2 to Yb3+:2F5/2, resulting in the emission of a single photon at ~1 µm.
All processes (a-d) require some extent of phonon interaction.

The first two mechanisms (a-b) appear rather unlikely due to the following reasons: firstly, the absence of Pr3+ PL bands from 3P01G4 (which should occur ~950 nm), from 1G43H6 (~1850 nm) and from 1G43H5 (~1330 nm), what indicates poor population of the 1G4 level of Pr3+. Secondly, the 1G4 level of Pr3+ is ~200 cm−1 lower than the 2F5/2 level of Yb3+. This means that energy transfer should rather occur from Yb3+ to Pr3+ than vice versa. Thirdly, the absorption band which is assigned to the transition from the ground state of Pr3+, 3H4, to the 1G4 level is very weak (Fig. 1). Fourthly, the energy gap between the 1G4 and the lower lying 3F4 level is low (~3000 cm−1) may lead to very high multi-phonon assisted non-radiative transition rates from the 1G4 level. Finally, the branching ratio of the 3P01G4 radiative transition and the total radiative rates of the 3P0 level are as low as ~0.06 and 218.07 cm−1, respectively, resulting in a low population of the 1G4 level (Table 1).

4. Conclusions

Acknowledgment

The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) through the Cluster of Excellence “Engineering of Advanced Materials - EAM”.

References and links

1.

M. A. Green, K. Emery, Y. Hishikawa, W. Warta, and E. D. Dunlop, “Solar cell efficiency tables (version 39),” Prog. Photovolt. Res. Appl. 20(1), 12–20 (2012). [CrossRef]

2.

J. J. Eilers, D. Biner, J. T. van Wijngaarden, K. Krämer, H.-U. Güdel, and A. Meijerink, “Efficient visible to infrared quantum cutting through downconversion with the Er3+–Yb3+ couple in Cs3Y2Br9,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 151106 (2010). [CrossRef]

3.

G. Gao and L. Wondraczek, “Near-infrared downconversion in Mn2+–Yb3+ co-doped Zn2GeO4,” J. Mater. Chem. 1(10), 1952–1958 (2013). [CrossRef]

4.

B. M. van der Ende, L. Aarts, and A. Meijerink, “Near-infrared quantum cutting for photovoltaics,” Adv. Mater. 21(30), 3073–3077 (2009). [CrossRef]

5.

B. M. van der Ende, L. Aarts, and A. Meijerink, “Lanthanide ions as spectral converters for solar cells,” Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11(47), 11081–11095 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

D. Chen, Y. Wang, Y. Yu, P. Huang, and F. Weng, “Near-infrared quantum cutting in transparent nanostructured glass ceramics,” Opt. Lett. 33(16), 1884–1886 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

D. Yu, S. Ye, M. Peng, Q. Zhang, and L. Wondraczek, “Sequential three-step three-photon near-infrared quantum splitting in β-NaYF4:Tm3+,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 100(19), 191911 (2012). [CrossRef]

8.

D. Yu, X. Huang, S. Ye, M. Peng, Q. Zhang, and L. Wondraczek, “Three-photon near-infrared quantum splitting in β-NaYF4:Ho3+,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 99(16), 161904 (2011). [CrossRef]

9.

D. Yu, S. Ye, M. Peng, Q. Zhang, J. Qiu, J. Wang, and L. Wondraczek, “Efficient near-infrared downconversion in GdVO4:Dy3+ phosphors for enhancing the photo-response of solar cells,” Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 95(7), 1590–1593 (2011). [CrossRef]

10.

S. Ye, J. Zhou, S. Wang, R. Hu, D. Wang, and J. Qiu, “Broadband downshifting luminescence in Cr3+-Yb3+ co-doped garnet for efficient photovoltaic generation,” Opt. Express 21(4), 4167–4173 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

J. Zhou, Y. Teng, S. Ye, Y. Zhuang, and J. Qiu, “Enhanced downconversion luminescence by co-doping Ce3+ in Tb3+–Yb3+ doped borate glasses,” Chem. Phys. Lett. 486(4-6), 116–118 (2010). [CrossRef]

12.

S. Ye, N. Jiang, J. Zhou, D. Wang, and J. Qiu, “Optical property and energy transfer in the ZnO-LiYbO2 hybrid phosphors under the indirect near-UV excitation,” J. Electrochem. Soc. 159(1), H11–H15 (2012). [CrossRef]

13.

J. Zhou, Y. Teng, X. Liu, S. Ye, Z. Ma, and J. Qiu, “Broadband spectral modification from visible light to near-infrared radiation using Ce3+-Er3+ co-doped yttrium aluminum garnet,” Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 12(41), 13759–13762 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

J. de Wild, A. Meijerink, J. K. Rath, W. G. J. H. M. van Sark, and R. E. I. Schropp, “Upconverter solar cells: materials and applications,” Energy Environ. Sci. 4(12), 4835–4848 (2011). [CrossRef]

15.

H.-Q. Wang, M. Batentschuk, A. Osvet, L. Pinna, and C. J. Brabec, “Rare-earth ion-doped up conversion materials for photovoltaic applications,” Adv. Mater. 23(22-23), 2675–2680 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

Z. Xia, Y. Luo, M. Guan, and L. Liao, “Near-infrared luminescence and energy transfer studies of LaOBr:Nd3+/Yb3+.,” Opt. Express 20(Suppl 5), A722–A728 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

17.

M. Peng and L. Wondraczek, “Bismuth-doped oxide glasses as potential solar spectral converters and concentrators,” J. Mater. Chem. 19(5), 627–630 (2009). [CrossRef]

18.

B. S. Richards, “Enhancing the performance of silicon solar cells via the application of passive luminescence conversion layers,” Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 90(15), 2329–2337 (2006). [CrossRef]

19.

V. D. Rodríguez, V. K. Tikhomirov, J. Méndez-Ramos, A. C. Yanes, and V. V. Moshchalkov, “Towards broad range and highly efficient downconversion of solar spectrum by Er3+-Yb3+ co-doped nanostructured glass-ceramics,” Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 94(10), 1612–1617 (2010). [CrossRef]

20.

S. Ye, B. Zhu, J. Chen, J. Luo, and J. Qiu, “Infrared quantum cutting in Tb3+,Yb3+ co-doped transparent glass ceramics containing CaF2 nanocrystals,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 92(14), 141112 (2008). [CrossRef]

21.

A. Guille, A. Pereira, C. Martinet, and B. Moine, “Quantum cutting in CaYAlO4: Pr3+, Yb3+,” Opt. Lett. 37(12), 2280–2282 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

22.

Y. Xu, X. Zhang, S. Dai, B. Fan, H. Ma, J.-I. Adam, J. Ren, and G. Chen, “Efficient near-infrared downconversion in Pr3+-Yb3+ co-doped glasses and glass ceramics containing LaF3 nanocrystals,” J. Phys. Chem. C 115(26), 13056–13062 (2011). [CrossRef]

23.

W. Höland and G. H. Beall, Glass Ceramic Technology (Am. Ceram. Soc., 2002).

24.

W. Zhang, Q. Chen, J. Zhang, Q. Qian, Q. Zhang, and L. Wondraczek, “Enhanced NIR emission from nanocrystalline LaF3:Ho3+ germanate glass ceramics for E-band optical amplification,” J. Alloy. Comp. 541, 323–327 (2012). [CrossRef]

25.

G. Gao, R. Meszaros, M. Peng, and L. Wondraczek, “Broadband UV-to-green photoconversion in V-doped lithium zinc silicate glasses and glass ceramics,” Opt. Express 19(Suppl 3), A312–A318 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

26.

G. Lakshminarayana and L. Wondraczek, “Photoluminescence and energy transfer in Tb3+/Mn2+ co-doped ZnAl2O4 glass ceramics,” J. Solid State Chem. 184(8), 1931–1938 (2011). [CrossRef]

27.

G. Gao, S. Reibstein, M. Peng, and L. Wondraczek, “Tunable dual-mode photoluminescence from nanocrystalline Eu-doped Li2ZnSiO4 glass ceramic phosphors,” J. Mater. Chem. 21(9), 3156–3161 (2011). [CrossRef]

28.

G. Gao, N. Da, S. Reibstein, and L. Wondraczek, “Enhanced photoluminescence from mixed-valence Eu-doped nanocrystalline silicate glass ceramics,” Opt. Express 18(Suppl 4), A575–A583 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

29.

K. L. Ley, M. Krumpelt, R. Kumar, J. H. Meiser, and I. Bloom, “Glass-ceramic sealants for solid oxide fuel cells: Par I. Physical properties,” J. Mater. Res. 11(06), 1489–1493 (1996). [CrossRef]

30.

R. Shannon, “Revised effective ionic radii and systematic studies of interatomic distances in halides and chalcogenides,” Acta Crystallogr. A 32(5), 751–767 (1976). [CrossRef]

31.

Q. Chen, W. Zhang, X. Huang, G. Dong, M. Peng, and Q. Zhang, “Efficient down- and up-conversion of Pr3+-Yb3+ co-doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics,” J. Alloy. Comp. 513, 139–144 (2012). [CrossRef]

32.

D. K. Sardar and C. C. Russel III, “Optical transitions, absorption intensities, and inter-manifold emission cross section of Pr3+ (4f2) in Ca5(PO4)3F crystal host,” J. Appl. Phys. 95(10), 5334–5339 (2004). [CrossRef]

33.

G. Gao, G. Wang, C. Yu, J. Zhang, and L. Hu, “Investigation of 2.0 μm emission in Tm3+ and Ho3+ co-doped oxyfluoride tellurite glass,” J. Lumin. 129(9), 1042–1047 (2009). [CrossRef]

34.

J. T. van Wijngaarden, S. Scheidelaar, T. J. H. Vlugt, M. F. Reid, and A. Meijerink, “Energy transfer mechanism for downconversion in the (Pr3+, Yb3+) couple,” Phys. Rev. B 81(15), 155112 (2010). [CrossRef]

35.

X. Chen, X. Huang, and Q. Zhang, “Concentration-dependent near-infrared quantum cutting in NaYF4:Pr3+, Yb3+ phosphor,” J. Appl. Phys. 106(6), 063518 (2009). [CrossRef]

36.

E. van der Kolk, O. M. Ten Kate, J. W. Wiegman, D. Biner, and K. W. Krämer, “Enhanced 1G4 emission in NaLaF4: Pr3+, Yb3+ and charge transfer in NaLaF4: Ce3+, Yb3+ studied by Fourier transform luminescence spectroscopy,” Opt. Mater. 33(7), 1024–1027 (2011). [CrossRef]

37.

G. Gao, S. Reibstein, E. Spiecker, M. Peng, and L. Wondraczek, “Broadband NIR photoluminescence from Ni2+-doped nanocrystalline Ba–Al titanate glass ceramics,” J. Mater. Chem. 22(6), 2582–2588 (2012). [CrossRef]

38.

G. Gao, M. Peng, and L. Wondraczek, “Temperature dependence and quantum efficiency of ultra-broad NIR photoluminescence from Ni2+ centers in nanocrystalline Ba-Al titanate glass ceramics,” Opt. Lett. 37(7), 1166–1168 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

39.

G. Gao, S. Reibstein, M. Peng, and L. Wondraczek, “Dual-mode photoluminescence from nanocrystalline Mn2+-doped Li,Zn-aluminosilicate glass ceramics,” Phys. Chem. Glasses52, 59–63 (2011).

40.

Q. Zhang, G. Yang, and Z. Jiang, “Cooperative downconversion in GdAl3(BO3)4:RE3+,Yb3+ (RE = Pr, Tb, and Tm),” Appl. Phys. Lett. 91(5), 051903 (2007). [CrossRef]

41.

A. Nakatsuka, O. Ohtaka, H. Arima, N. Nakayama, and T. Mizota, “Aragonite-type lanthanum orthoborate, LaBO3,” Acta Crystallogr. Sect. E Struct. Rep. Online 62(4), i103–i105 (2006). [CrossRef]

42.

Y. Katayama and S. Tanabe, “Mechanism of quantum cutting in Pr3+-Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics,” J. Lumin. 134, 825–829 (2013). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(160.2540) Materials : Fluorescent and luminescent materials
(160.2750) Materials : Glass and other amorphous materials
(160.4670) Materials : Optical materials
(160.5690) Materials : Rare-earth-doped materials

ToC Category:
Fluorescent and Luminescent Materials

History
Original Manuscript: March 25, 2013
Revised Manuscript: April 10, 2013
Manuscript Accepted: April 11, 2013
Published: April 18, 2013

Citation
Guojun Gao and Lothar Wondraczek, "Near-infrared downconversion in Pr3+/Yb3+ co-doped boro-aluminosilicate glasses and LaBO3 glass ceramics," Opt. Mater. Express 3, 633-644 (2013)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ome/abstract.cfm?URI=ome-3-5-633


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. M. A. Green, K. Emery, Y. Hishikawa, W. Warta, and E. D. Dunlop, “Solar cell efficiency tables (version 39),” Prog. Photovolt. Res. Appl.20(1), 12–20 (2012). [CrossRef]
  2. J. J. Eilers, D. Biner, J. T. van Wijngaarden, K. Krämer, H.-U. Güdel, and A. Meijerink, “Efficient visible to infrared quantum cutting through downconversion with the Er3+–Yb3+ couple in Cs3Y2Br9,” Appl. Phys. Lett.96, 151106 (2010). [CrossRef]
  3. G. Gao and L. Wondraczek, “Near-infrared downconversion in Mn2+–Yb3+ co-doped Zn2GeO4,” J. Mater. Chem.1(10), 1952–1958 (2013). [CrossRef]
  4. B. M. van der Ende, L. Aarts, and A. Meijerink, “Near-infrared quantum cutting for photovoltaics,” Adv. Mater.21(30), 3073–3077 (2009). [CrossRef]
  5. B. M. van der Ende, L. Aarts, and A. Meijerink, “Lanthanide ions as spectral converters for solar cells,” Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.11(47), 11081–11095 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. D. Chen, Y. Wang, Y. Yu, P. Huang, and F. Weng, “Near-infrared quantum cutting in transparent nanostructured glass ceramics,” Opt. Lett.33(16), 1884–1886 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. D. Yu, S. Ye, M. Peng, Q. Zhang, and L. Wondraczek, “Sequential three-step three-photon near-infrared quantum splitting in β-NaYF4:Tm3+,” Appl. Phys. Lett.100(19), 191911 (2012). [CrossRef]
  8. D. Yu, X. Huang, S. Ye, M. Peng, Q. Zhang, and L. Wondraczek, “Three-photon near-infrared quantum splitting in β-NaYF4:Ho3+,” Appl. Phys. Lett.99(16), 161904 (2011). [CrossRef]
  9. D. Yu, S. Ye, M. Peng, Q. Zhang, J. Qiu, J. Wang, and L. Wondraczek, “Efficient near-infrared downconversion in GdVO4:Dy3+ phosphors for enhancing the photo-response of solar cells,” Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells95(7), 1590–1593 (2011). [CrossRef]
  10. S. Ye, J. Zhou, S. Wang, R. Hu, D. Wang, and J. Qiu, “Broadband downshifting luminescence in Cr3+-Yb3+ co-doped garnet for efficient photovoltaic generation,” Opt. Express21(4), 4167–4173 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. J. Zhou, Y. Teng, S. Ye, Y. Zhuang, and J. Qiu, “Enhanced downconversion luminescence by co-doping Ce3+ in Tb3+–Yb3+ doped borate glasses,” Chem. Phys. Lett.486(4-6), 116–118 (2010). [CrossRef]
  12. S. Ye, N. Jiang, J. Zhou, D. Wang, and J. Qiu, “Optical property and energy transfer in the ZnO-LiYbO2 hybrid phosphors under the indirect near-UV excitation,” J. Electrochem. Soc.159(1), H11–H15 (2012). [CrossRef]
  13. J. Zhou, Y. Teng, X. Liu, S. Ye, Z. Ma, and J. Qiu, “Broadband spectral modification from visible light to near-infrared radiation using Ce3+-Er3+ co-doped yttrium aluminum garnet,” Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.12(41), 13759–13762 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  14. J. de Wild, A. Meijerink, J. K. Rath, W. G. J. H. M. van Sark, and R. E. I. Schropp, “Upconverter solar cells: materials and applications,” Energy Environ. Sci.4(12), 4835–4848 (2011). [CrossRef]
  15. H.-Q. Wang, M. Batentschuk, A. Osvet, L. Pinna, and C. J. Brabec, “Rare-earth ion-doped up conversion materials for photovoltaic applications,” Adv. Mater.23(22-23), 2675–2680 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  16. Z. Xia, Y. Luo, M. Guan, and L. Liao, “Near-infrared luminescence and energy transfer studies of LaOBr:Nd3+/Yb3+.,” Opt. Express20(Suppl 5), A722–A728 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  17. M. Peng and L. Wondraczek, “Bismuth-doped oxide glasses as potential solar spectral converters and concentrators,” J. Mater. Chem.19(5), 627–630 (2009). [CrossRef]
  18. B. S. Richards, “Enhancing the performance of silicon solar cells via the application of passive luminescence conversion layers,” Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells90(15), 2329–2337 (2006). [CrossRef]
  19. V. D. Rodríguez, V. K. Tikhomirov, J. Méndez-Ramos, A. C. Yanes, and V. V. Moshchalkov, “Towards broad range and highly efficient downconversion of solar spectrum by Er3+-Yb3+ co-doped nanostructured glass-ceramics,” Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells94(10), 1612–1617 (2010). [CrossRef]
  20. S. Ye, B. Zhu, J. Chen, J. Luo, and J. Qiu, “Infrared quantum cutting in Tb3+,Yb3+ co-doped transparent glass ceramics containing CaF2 nanocrystals,” Appl. Phys. Lett.92(14), 141112 (2008). [CrossRef]
  21. A. Guille, A. Pereira, C. Martinet, and B. Moine, “Quantum cutting in CaYAlO4: Pr3+, Yb3+,” Opt. Lett.37(12), 2280–2282 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  22. Y. Xu, X. Zhang, S. Dai, B. Fan, H. Ma, J.-I. Adam, J. Ren, and G. Chen, “Efficient near-infrared downconversion in Pr3+-Yb3+ co-doped glasses and glass ceramics containing LaF3 nanocrystals,” J. Phys. Chem. C115(26), 13056–13062 (2011). [CrossRef]
  23. W. Höland and G. H. Beall, Glass Ceramic Technology (Am. Ceram. Soc., 2002).
  24. W. Zhang, Q. Chen, J. Zhang, Q. Qian, Q. Zhang, and L. Wondraczek, “Enhanced NIR emission from nanocrystalline LaF3:Ho3+ germanate glass ceramics for E-band optical amplification,” J. Alloy. Comp.541, 323–327 (2012). [CrossRef]
  25. G. Gao, R. Meszaros, M. Peng, and L. Wondraczek, “Broadband UV-to-green photoconversion in V-doped lithium zinc silicate glasses and glass ceramics,” Opt. Express19(Suppl 3), A312–A318 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  26. G. Lakshminarayana and L. Wondraczek, “Photoluminescence and energy transfer in Tb3+/Mn2+ co-doped ZnAl2O4 glass ceramics,” J. Solid State Chem.184(8), 1931–1938 (2011). [CrossRef]
  27. G. Gao, S. Reibstein, M. Peng, and L. Wondraczek, “Tunable dual-mode photoluminescence from nanocrystalline Eu-doped Li2ZnSiO4 glass ceramic phosphors,” J. Mater. Chem.21(9), 3156–3161 (2011). [CrossRef]
  28. G. Gao, N. Da, S. Reibstein, and L. Wondraczek, “Enhanced photoluminescence from mixed-valence Eu-doped nanocrystalline silicate glass ceramics,” Opt. Express18(Suppl 4), A575–A583 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  29. K. L. Ley, M. Krumpelt, R. Kumar, J. H. Meiser, and I. Bloom, “Glass-ceramic sealants for solid oxide fuel cells: Par I. Physical properties,” J. Mater. Res.11(06), 1489–1493 (1996). [CrossRef]
  30. R. Shannon, “Revised effective ionic radii and systematic studies of interatomic distances in halides and chalcogenides,” Acta Crystallogr. A32(5), 751–767 (1976). [CrossRef]
  31. Q. Chen, W. Zhang, X. Huang, G. Dong, M. Peng, and Q. Zhang, “Efficient down- and up-conversion of Pr3+-Yb3+ co-doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics,” J. Alloy. Comp.513, 139–144 (2012). [CrossRef]
  32. D. K. Sardar and C. C. Russel, “Optical transitions, absorption intensities, and inter-manifold emission cross section of Pr3+ (4f2) in Ca5(PO4)3F crystal host,” J. Appl. Phys.95(10), 5334–5339 (2004). [CrossRef]
  33. G. Gao, G. Wang, C. Yu, J. Zhang, and L. Hu, “Investigation of 2.0 μm emission in Tm3+ and Ho3+ co-doped oxyfluoride tellurite glass,” J. Lumin.129(9), 1042–1047 (2009). [CrossRef]
  34. J. T. van Wijngaarden, S. Scheidelaar, T. J. H. Vlugt, M. F. Reid, and A. Meijerink, “Energy transfer mechanism for downconversion in the (Pr3+, Yb3+) couple,” Phys. Rev. B81(15), 155112 (2010). [CrossRef]
  35. X. Chen, X. Huang, and Q. Zhang, “Concentration-dependent near-infrared quantum cutting in NaYF4:Pr3+, Yb3+ phosphor,” J. Appl. Phys.106(6), 063518 (2009). [CrossRef]
  36. E. van der Kolk, O. M. Ten Kate, J. W. Wiegman, D. Biner, and K. W. Krämer, “Enhanced 1G4 emission in NaLaF4: Pr3+, Yb3+ and charge transfer in NaLaF4: Ce3+, Yb3+ studied by Fourier transform luminescence spectroscopy,” Opt. Mater.33(7), 1024–1027 (2011). [CrossRef]
  37. G. Gao, S. Reibstein, E. Spiecker, M. Peng, and L. Wondraczek, “Broadband NIR photoluminescence from Ni2+-doped nanocrystalline Ba–Al titanate glass ceramics,” J. Mater. Chem.22(6), 2582–2588 (2012). [CrossRef]
  38. G. Gao, M. Peng, and L. Wondraczek, “Temperature dependence and quantum efficiency of ultra-broad NIR photoluminescence from Ni2+ centers in nanocrystalline Ba-Al titanate glass ceramics,” Opt. Lett.37(7), 1166–1168 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  39. G. Gao, S. Reibstein, M. Peng, and L. Wondraczek, “Dual-mode photoluminescence from nanocrystalline Mn2+-doped Li,Zn-aluminosilicate glass ceramics,” Phys. Chem. Glasses52, 59–63 (2011).
  40. Q. Zhang, G. Yang, and Z. Jiang, “Cooperative downconversion in GdAl3(BO3)4:RE3+,Yb3+ (RE = Pr, Tb, and Tm),” Appl. Phys. Lett.91(5), 051903 (2007). [CrossRef]
  41. A. Nakatsuka, O. Ohtaka, H. Arima, N. Nakayama, and T. Mizota, “Aragonite-type lanthanum orthoborate, LaBO3,” Acta Crystallogr. Sect. E Struct. Rep. Online62(4), i103–i105 (2006). [CrossRef]
  42. Y. Katayama and S. Tanabe, “Mechanism of quantum cutting in Pr3+-Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics,” J. Lumin.134, 825–829 (2013). [CrossRef]

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.


« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited