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Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics

Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics

| EXPLORING THE INTERFACE OF LIGHT AND BIOMEDICINE

  • Editors: Andrew Dunn and Anthony Durkin
  • Vol. 6, Iss. 9 — Oct. 3, 2011

On the accuracy of framing-rate measurements in ultra-high speed rotating mirror cameras

Michael Conneely, Hans O. Rolfsnes, Charles Main, David McGloin, and Paul A. Campbell  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 19, Issue 17, pp. 16432-16437 (2011)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.19.016432


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Abstract

Rotating mirror systems based on the Miller Principle are a mainstay modality for ultra-high speed imaging within the range 1-25 million frames per second. Importantly, the true temporal accuracy of observations recorded in such cameras is sensitive to the framing rate that the system directly associates with each individual data acquisition. The purpose for the present investigation was to examine the validity of such system-reported frame rates in a widely used commercial system (a Cordin 550-62 model) by independently measuring the framing rate at the instant of triggering. Here, we found a small but significant difference between such measurements: the average discrepancy (over the entire spectrum of frame rates used) was found to be 0.66 ± 0.48%, with a maximum difference of 2.33%. The principal reason for this discrepancy was traced to non-optimized sampling of the mirror rotation rate within the system protocol. This paper thus serves three purposes: (i) we highlight a straightforward diagnostic approach to facilitate scrutiny of rotating-mirror system integrity; (ii) we raise awareness of the intrinsic errors associated with data previously acquired with this particular system and model; and (iii), we recommend that future control routines address the sampling issue by implementing real-time measurement at the instant of triggering.

© 2011 OSA

OCIS Codes
(170.7160) Medical optics and biotechnology : Ultrafast technology
(320.3980) Ultrafast optics : Microsecond phenomena

ToC Category:
Imaging Systems

History
Original Manuscript: June 6, 2011
Manuscript Accepted: July 25, 2011
Published: August 11, 2011

Virtual Issues
Vol. 6, Iss. 9 Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics

Citation
Michael Conneely, Hans O. Rolfsnes, Charles Main, David McGloin, and Paul A. Campbell, "On the accuracy of framing-rate measurements in ultra-high speed rotating mirror cameras," Opt. Express 19, 16432-16437 (2011)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/vjbo/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-19-17-16432


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References

  1. V. Parker and C. Roberts, High Speed Photography and Photonics, S. F. Ray, ed. (SPIE Press, 1997), Chap. 10.
  2. C. T. Chin, C. Lancée, J. Borsboom, F. Mastik, M. E. Frijlink, N. de Jong, M. Versluis, and D. Lohse, “Brandaris 128: A digital 25 million frames per second camera with 128 highly sensitive frames,” Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74(12), 5026–5034 (2003). [CrossRef]
  3. N. de Jong, C. T. Chin, C. Lancee, J. Borsboom, F. Mastick, M. Versluis, D. Lohse, and V. Parker, “Brandaris 128: a rotating mirror digital camera with 128 frames at 25Mfps,” Proc. SPIE 4948, 342–347 (2003). [CrossRef]
  4. D. V. T. Son, T. G. Etoh, and M. Tanaka, “Toward 100 mega-frames per second: design of an ultimate ultra-high-speed image sensor,” Sensors (Basel Switzerland) 10, 16–35 (2010).
  5. Cordin 550 User’s Manual (Cordin Company, Inc, 2004)
  6. S. Palmer, Technical Advisor, Cordin Company Inc, (private communication, 2011)

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